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United States Foreign Relations Philippines

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NEWS
April 29, 1997 | FAYE FIORE
By all indications, it looked like it was going to be a Wednesday afternoon session of vacation slides from hell. There we were, holed up on a lovely spring day in the Capitol Hill office of Rep. Bob Filner, San Diego Democrat, while he described snapshots of his recent trip to the Philippines. Everybody got their own set. "Bob and Jane Filner enjoy breakfast with the Sons and Daughters of World War II veterans. . . .
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NEWS
December 18, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade after the Philippines kicked the United States military out of the country, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo said Monday that the international fight against terrorism has turned the two countries into close allies again. Arroyo, who visited Washington last month and won a promise of $100 million in military aid, said the United States has resumed using its former bases in the Philippines for refueling and storage for forces heading to Afghanistan.
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NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines Senate today formally rejected a new military base treaty with the United States, plunging the Philippines into an economic and political crisis over the future of the Subic Bay Naval Base, America's last military outpost in Southeast Asia. The 12-11 vote by the Senate came a day after President Corazon Aquino announced that she will seek a national referendum to decide the base question, attempting to override the Senate action with a popular vote.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after the Philippine Senate ordered the U.S. military out of the country, Manila appears likely to ratify a new agreement with Washington for increased military cooperation. Although a 1951 mutual defense pact has remained in effect, the forced closure of Clark Air Base, once the largest U.S. military facility outside the continental United States, and a naval base at Subic Bay led to strains in the Manila-Washington relationship that continue to this day. No U.S.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As bugles blared retreat and a farewell honor guard stood at attention, the American flag was slowly lowered for the last time here Tuesday as the United States formally turned over its oldest and once-largest overseas base to the Philippines. Within an hour of the solemn ceremony, dozens of looters were reported climbing over fences toward a base housing complex and ripping out major electric cables.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after the Philippine Senate ordered the U.S. military out of the country, Manila appears likely to ratify a new agreement with Washington for increased military cooperation. Although a 1951 mutual defense pact has remained in effect, the forced closure of Clark Air Base, once the largest U.S. military facility outside the continental United States, and a naval base at Subic Bay led to strains in the Manila-Washington relationship that continue to this day. No U.S.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
Vice President Dan Quayle, who arrived amid anti-American demonstrations here Tuesday night shortly after suspected Communist rebels killed two American employees at a U.S. military base, today condemned the killings as "cowardly murders" that were linked to his visit. Although no group immediately claimed responsibility, U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | JIM MANN and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Members of the Philippine Senate cast a preliminary vote Monday to reject a new bases deal with the United States, raising the possibility that the 93-year U.S. military presence in the country will end when the current agreement expires next week. Bush Administration officials hope that Philippine President Corazon Aquino--who came to power with U.S.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Working out of a second-floor office in an ultramodern building in Makati, a suburb of Manila, a mysterious American group has spent the past several months acquiring walkie-talkies, metal detectors, computers and some of the most advanced office equipment in the Philippines. A brass sign outside the office provides few clues to what goes on within. "Restricted Area," it cautions. But in the past few weeks, this shadowy group has become the focus of controversy.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States, driven by budgetary realities and nature's explosive whims, reached a new bases agreement with the Philippines on Wednesday under which it will abandon Clark Air Base in 1992 but keep the sprawling Subic Bay Naval Base for 10 more years. Clark, one of the largest and oldest U.S. military outposts overseas, was buried under thousands of tons of ash when Mt. Pinatubo exploded into life in mid-June after more than 600 years of inactivity. U.S.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos and President Clinton reinforced their nations' economic and security ties Friday, but their working lunch yielded no resolution to disputes over Filipino veterans' benefits or the return of two Philippine church bells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | JOHN M. GONZALES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippine President Fidel Ramos swept through Los Angeles on Wednesday as part of a four-day mission to strengthen economic and political ties with the Pacific Rim, finding a warm public reception at several of his speaking engagements but some protesters who oppose his policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
Philippine President Fidel Ramos landed Tuesday in Los Angeles for the first leg of a four-day visit to California, where the leader credited by some for spearheading stability and economic growth in his country is expected to meet some protests.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | FAYE FIORE
By all indications, it looked like it was going to be a Wednesday afternoon session of vacation slides from hell. There we were, holed up on a lovely spring day in the Capitol Hill office of Rep. Bob Filner, San Diego Democrat, while he described snapshots of his recent trip to the Philippines. Everybody got their own set. "Bob and Jane Filner enjoy breakfast with the Sons and Daughters of World War II veterans. . . .
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America always seems to dream of the Asian mainland, but it always returns to the Philippines. And so, in the person of President Clinton, America symbolically came back to the Philippines on Sunday, just two years after a bitter exodus from the military bases it had occupied for nearly a century. This time, the tone was less grandiose than that of the most famous returnee here, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who once said that the Philippines "fastened me with a grip that never relaxed."
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hailing a "ferocious love of freedom," President Clinton today toured two of the Philippines' most hallowed World War II shrines to honor the fallen and try to strengthen the passionate but often-strained U.S.-Philippine alliance. In his first commemoration of Pacific fighting 50 years ago, Clinton scanned a sea of 18,000 Allied grave markers at the Manila American Cemetery and declared "time has diminished none of our pride in them.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
A heavy afternoon rain Wednesday washed the bloodstains and police chalk marks off a lonely stretch of road near this town about 60 miles north of Manila. Only some bullet holes remain, chipped in the concrete crypts of a graveyard that flanks the road on both sides. But the impact of the slaying Tuesday of two Americans employed at a U.S. military base will not fade so easily for the more than 80,000 Americans living in this increasingly tense country.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With tears, cheers and a 21-gun salute on the windy shores of this scenic port, the United States bade a final emotional farewell Tuesday to Subic Bay, long its largest overseas military base, and formally closed a remarkable chapter in both American and Philippine history. At precisely 10 a.m., a Marine honor guard hauled down and crisply folded the American flag for the final time at the last U.S. base in America's former colony. Moments later, Philippine President Fidel V.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos vowed Monday to work out a "new partnership" between their two countries, including increased security cooperation, in an effort to ease tensions caused by the ouster of American forces from former U.S. bases in the Philippines.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With tears, cheers and a 21-gun salute on the windy shores of this scenic port, the United States bade a final emotional farewell Tuesday to Subic Bay, long its largest overseas military base, and formally closed a remarkable chapter in both American and Philippine history. At precisely 10 a.m., a Marine honor guard hauled down and crisply folded the American flag for the final time at the last U.S. base in America's former colony. Moments later, Philippine President Fidel V.
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