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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | United Press International
An Arab group, angered over Secretary of State George P. Shultz's refusal to grant Yasser Arafat a visa to enter the United States, wants Stanford University to bar Shultz from its classrooms. The South Bay Arab American Organization, in a letter to Stanford President Donald Kennedy, said Shultz, a professor in Stanford's Graduate School of Business, should not be allowed to teach when he returns from a leave of absence.
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NEWS
December 3, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration, signaling a turning point in its Middle East policy, put Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on notice Sunday that it will no longer deal with him unless he immediately closes down extremist organizations and arrests the militants behind escalating violence in Israel. President Bush met Sunday with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, moving up a meeting planned for today.
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NEWS
November 27, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, citing national security concerns, announced Saturday that it has denied Yasser Arafat a visa to enter the United States to address the U.N. General Assembly in New York on Thursday when it opens debate on Palestinian issues. In a statement explaining the decision by Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell affirmed his support Friday for establishing a Palestinian state on land held by Israel and said he was trying to arrange a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat to give peacemaking "a jump-start." Powell said Israel should give up land for peace, as provided in U.N. Security Council resolutions adopted after the 1967 and 1973 Middle East wars.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright heads to the Middle East this week for meetings that could set the tone for U.S. involvement in the troubled region for the rest of the Clinton administration, and possibly years longer. Israel and the Palestinians--negotiating without direct U.S. involvement for the first time in almost four years--are closing in on an interim peace agreement that probably will be signed shortly after Albright arrives.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, Yasser Arafat has vowed to declare the establishment of a Palestinian state on May 4, despite repeated Israeli promises to retaliate if he does so. The Palestinian Authority president has used the issue of independence--and the specter of the violence that might result--as a powerful bargaining chip.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | From Reuters
Palestine Liberation Organization ruling bodies will meet in April to decide whether Palestinians will declare an independent state on May 4, an advisor to Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat said Saturday. "Several PLO bodies will be called in April, most probably in the first week of April, to announce the Palestinian decision regarding declaration of a state," said Nabil abu Rudaineh. He said the meetings would be held in Palestinian self-rule areas.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell ventured into the Mideast peace process Sunday in his first meetings with Israeli and Palestinian leaders, but he came away with no significant signs that his visit had changed the thinking of either party to the conflict. Despite lengthy talks with Israeli Prime Minister-elect Ariel Sharon and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, Powell acknowledged that it will be "some time" before the two sides revive negotiations.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton visited the Gaza Strip 25 months ago, he received a hero's welcome and the grateful fawnings of Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat. Today, Arafat, or at least those around him, is openly contemptuous of Clinton and the U.S. "peace team" that toiled in the diplomatic trenches for the last eight years with, the Palestinians argue, little to show for it. During Clinton's Gaza visit, stores sold U.S.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell affirmed his support Friday for establishing a Palestinian state on land held by Israel and said he was trying to arrange a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat to give peacemaking "a jump-start." Powell said Israel should give up land for peace, as provided in U.N. Security Council resolutions adopted after the 1967 and 1973 Middle East wars.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a chance to pull Israelis and Palestinians out of their downward spiral of violence, it lies in the road map outlined by the international commission headed by former U.S. Sen. George J. Mitchell and strongly endorsed Monday by the Bush administration. But in the caldron of hatred that is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict today, few see much hope of success in the commission's coolheaded prescription for ending the fighting and returning to negotiations.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell ventured into the Mideast peace process Sunday in his first meetings with Israeli and Palestinian leaders, but he came away with no significant signs that his visit had changed the thinking of either party to the conflict. Despite lengthy talks with Israeli Prime Minister-elect Ariel Sharon and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, Powell acknowledged that it will be "some time" before the two sides revive negotiations.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton visited the Gaza Strip 25 months ago, he received a hero's welcome and the grateful fawnings of Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat. Today, Arafat, or at least those around him, is openly contemptuous of Clinton and the U.S. "peace team" that toiled in the diplomatic trenches for the last eight years with, the Palestinians argue, little to show for it. During Clinton's Gaza visit, stores sold U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a week of last-ditch talks with Palestinian and Israeli leaders, President Clinton said Sunday that he will push for peace until his last moment in office, but he signaled that he does not expect an agreement before his term ends, in less than two weeks.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After receiving qualified backing from Arab foreign ministers Thursday for his peacemaking efforts, Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat said he hopes to conclude an agreement with Israel before President Clinton leaves office later this month. Upon his return to the Gaza Strip from the Arab League meeting in Cairo, reporters asked Arafat whether an accord is possible before Clinton steps down Jan. 20. "We hope so," he said.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking back on eight years of trying to reason, cajole and occasionally bully Israel and the Palestinians into signing a final peace settlement, President Clinton acknowledges that the issue has been the hardest he has ever tried to resolve. But with only three weeks left in his second term, Clinton refuses to stop trying, even though the chances of success are becoming increasingly forlorn.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright voiced frustration Sunday with the months-long stalemate in Middle East peace negotiations, admitting that her latest talks with Israeli and Palestinian leaders had produced only "minimal progress" toward bridging the gaps. Albright, who stopped here as part of a diplomatic tour to rally support for a tough U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Palestinian official said Sunday that the Palestinians will not agree to renegotiate the specifics of a U.S. peace initiative they accepted in May, and he called on the Clinton administration to go public with its ideas for jump-starting the deadlocked peace process. "We urge the United States to submit [its] report," Palestinian chief negotiator Saeb Erekat said in Jerusalem.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only three months ago, President Clinton was presiding over summit talks that held the promise of a Mideast peace agreement. But Monday, Clinton and his aides were at work on a far graver effort--trying to prevent a full-scale Arab-Israeli war.
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its signature foreign policy objective in tatters, the Clinton administration struggled Sunday to refurbish its credentials as a Middle East peace broker, trying to walk a thin line between conflicting claims of Israelis and Palestinians while urging both sides to "break the cycle of violence." In appearances on Sunday television interview shows, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and White House National Security Advisor Samuel R.
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