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United States Foreign Relations Poland

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NEWS
February 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan, responding to pleas from church and trade union leaders, lifted economic sanctions against Poland on Thursday but warned the Warsaw government not to retreat on political reforms. "We will be watching to see that further steps are taken toward national reconciliation in Poland and that the progress made is not reversed," Reagan said in a statement.
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NEWS
June 26, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an emotional visit celebrating Polish-American friendship, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Sunday honored the memory of this country's anti-Communist strikers, received an honorary doctorate and helped christen a former U.S. frigate given to Poland. The themes of exceptionally warm national ties and shared support for democracy ran through Albright's visit to this Baltic Sea port--birthplace of Solidarity, the union that toppled communism in Poland in 1989.
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SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marcin Malinski, Konrad Galka and Adam Grodzki have come a long way to study Polish history. Their research is aquatic not academic, however, and the lessons are learned in a pool, not a classroom.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a buoyant rally near the birthplace of the former Warsaw Pact, President Clinton on Thursday saluted Poland for becoming America's prospective military ally and vowed that "never again" will its citizens be conquered by outsiders. "Poland is taking its place in the community of democracies," Clinton proclaimed in an outdoor celebration, just two days after NATO invited three former adversaries--Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic--to join the Western alliance.
SPORTS
July 11, 1988 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
After Artur Wojdat had surprised everyone, including himself, by breaking the world record in the 400-meter freestyle at the U.S. indoor national swim meet in Orlando, Fla., last March, he made an overseas phone call to his parents with his exciting news. It was 4 a.m. in Poznan, Poland, but he had to tell them about the world record, the first for a Polish swimmer. "They did not believe me!"
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a buoyant rally near the birthplace of the former Warsaw Pact, President Clinton on Thursday saluted Poland for becoming America's prospective military ally and vowed that "never again" will its citizens be conquered by outsiders. "Poland is taking its place in the community of democracies," Clinton proclaimed in an outdoor celebration, just two days after NATO invited three former adversaries--Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic--to join the Western alliance.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that the United States will reduce Poland's outstanding debt to the United States by 70%. The decrease, which goes beyond an agreement by Western allies to cut Poland's international debt in half, will lop more than $2.6 billion from the amount Poland owes the U.S. Treasury, leaving the longstanding debt at approximately $1.2 billion, U.S. government officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992
A Polish delegation will spend Tuesday visiting Orange County relief organizations and observing efforts to aid Los Angeles in the aftermath of the riots. The eight delegates, members of similar groups at home, are interested in studying how organizations are managed here, said Sherri Simms, spokeswoman for the International Visitors and Protocol Foundation of Orange County. During their tour, the delegates will visit the county headquarters of the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki will make a surprise trip to the United States this weekend and may confer with President Bush, government sources said. There was no comment on the report from the White House.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The theme in Poland this week is deja vu. Secretary of State James A. Baker III spent about seven hours here Sunday trying to overcome the jitters of Polish leaders over the thought that German reunification could mean a repeat of the history of World War II. "The issue is a very emotional one with the Polish people," a top-level State Department official told reporters aboard Baker's aircraft on the way home from Warsaw.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | From The Washington Post
On a stretch of highway in the mountains of northern Iraq one chilly autumn evening in 1990, a Polish intelligence officer pulled four bottles of Johnnie Walker Red out of a satchel and passed them to six new friends--from the United States. Drink, was the command. Although they had not had a bite to eat all day, the Americans obeyed the order and downed the Scotch. It was meant to help camouflage them as drunken Eastern Europeans, but it had no effect.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa called Wednesday for the removal of the new head of Poland's civilian intelligence service, saying his history as a top Communist-era spy could sour relations with the West. Walesa praised the "professionalism and many years of experience" of Marian Zacharski, who was appointed to the post Monday, but said his exploits as a Soviet Bloc spy overshadowed his credentials.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an embarrassment for the United States, Poland's non-Communist government has named one of the Cold War era's most successful Soviet Bloc spies as head of its civilian intelligence service. Marian Zacharski, 43, was sentenced to life imprisonment in the United States in 1981 for obtaining secret information on the U.S.-made B-1 bomber, the F-15 fighter and radar systems used in Patriot air-defense missiles, then passing the information to the East Bloc.
NEWS
April 21, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will promote Poland as a model for other Eastern European nations, Vice President Al Gore told Poles on Tuesday, promising that U.S. efforts to help Russia would not detract from American interest in their country. Gore, closing his first official journey abroad as vice president, told lawmakers and other dignitaries here that Poland is important in part "because it is showing the way to the future for an enormous part of the globe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992
A Polish delegation will spend Tuesday visiting Orange County relief organizations and observing efforts to aid Los Angeles in the aftermath of the riots. The eight delegates, members of similar groups at home, are interested in studying how organizations are managed here, said Sherri Simms, spokeswoman for the International Visitors and Protocol Foundation of Orange County. During their tour, the delegates will visit the county headquarters of the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said it is sending a technical adviser to the Polish securities commission for one year as part of a U.S. program to aid business development in the region. "This is part of a broader commitment on the part of President Bush to provide economic assistance to countries in Eastern Europe," SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Polish President Lech Walesa arrived in Washington for talks with President Bush as a senior Administration official said the United States will increase its commitment to forgive a portion of Poland's debt. Western nations agreed last Friday to forgive at least 50% of Poland's $33 billion debt to foreign governments. The United States will "go beyond the 50%," the official said.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | Associated Press
The State Department on Tuesday urged the Polish government to employ reconciliation, not force, in dealing with spreading labor unrest. "Free labor unions can help the Polish economic reform effort, not hinder it," spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley said. "Indeed, it is hard to see how economic reform can succeed without the participation of free trade unions. Economic reform is a truly national undertaking. It must include all the people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
The Orange County League of Women voters will host two of a group of 20 women leaders from Poland selected to visit the United States. Alicja Kedzia, vice president of the local Parliament in the district of Kalisz, and Zofia Rummel-Syska, a council chair of the Legal Commission of Warsaw, will stay in private homes and meet with elected officials and political groups during their stay from Saturday through June 13.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the aborted coup in Moscow, the Polish and Czechoslovak militaries traded intelligence data with Western forces on the readiness of 300,000 Soviet troops in eastern Germany, fearful that they might try to fight their way home to help the plotters, East European sources said Friday. As it turned out, no major Soviet military units in Germany or in the East European border region made preparations to move.
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