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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
Long gone are the soldiers who kept watch at an Army facility in the Santa Monica Mountains, searching the skies for Soviet planes that might soar in from the Pacific to bomb Los Angeles. Their weather-battered guard shack off a gravelly road in the steep hills behind Encino now has rusted window frames and a hole in one wall. Only the radar tower still stands tall.
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NEWS
March 13, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a light snow fell at dusk, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell showed up at the busy subway station on Pushkin Square here to place a bouquet of red roses beneath a plaque marking the spot where a suitcase bomb killed 13 and injured dozens Aug. 8, 2000. Powell bowed his head as Russian TV cameras filmed the scene. The brief ceremony last December contrasted sharply with President Clinton's visit here barely a month after the attack. Clinton never went near the site.
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NEWS
March 23, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. nuclear submarine collided with a Russian ballistic missile submarine over the weekend, the second such accident in 14 months, naval officials from the two countries announced Monday. The incident occurred late Friday night PST under the ice in the Barents Sea, just north of Russia, where submarines of the two navies have been tracking each other for years. The American vessel involved was the Grayling. The Russian sub was not identified.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian official Friday praised a compromise with the Bush administration that he said will mean as much as $620 million more from the United States to help Russia dismantle its deadly chemical weapons arsenal. Sergei V. Kiriyenko, President Vladimir V. Putin's special envoy for chemical disarmament, said the agreement is crucial for both countries at a time when the world has become more alert to the possibility of chemical weapons' finding their way into the hands of terrorists.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crowing with pride, Russia's air force chief claimed Wednesday that a group of Russian warplanes buzzed the U.S. aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk in the Sea of Japan, taking pictures of the reaction on deck, in an episode that flashed back to the cat-and-mouse games of the Cold War. "For the Americans, our planes were a complete surprise," boasted Gen. Anatoly M. Kornukov, the Russian air force's commander in chief. "In the pictures, you can clearly see the panic on deck."
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton and Richard Nixon, after a long telephone conversation last week and a private White House meeting Monday night, have put aside their gaping generational and ideological gulfs and found common ground on the question of aid to Russia. Former President Nixon, seeking the mantle of America's elder statesman, believes that the United States must lead in the salvation of Russian democracy to prevent the re-emergence of threatening Slavic nationalism.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid intense talk of crises in Asia's economies, Myanmar's junta, Cambodia's elections, Indonesia's political upheaval and India's and Pakistan's nuclear programs, the foreign ministers from 21 countries broke Tuesday for a bit of slightly surreal and distinctly off-key levity from the former superpower rivals. Diplomatic detente temporarily turned into a love feast as Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny M.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Gates, on the first visit by a CIA director to Moscow, told Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday about one of the U.S. intelligence coups of the Cold War--the raising of a Soviet submarine by the spy ship Glomar Explorer, Russian sources said.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Russia's first diplomatic tiff with Washington since the Cold War's end, Moscow expelled a senior American diplomat Monday in retaliation for last week's ouster of a Russian envoy from the United States. The Russian Foreign Ministry identified diplomat James L. Morris, listed as a counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, as the CIA station chief here.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
A Russian rocket carrying a payload of religious icons, appeals for world peace and a stuffed toy dog took dreams of better business into orbit early today. The three-stage Soyuz rocket blasted off from the once-secret Plesetsk space center near the northern Russian port of Archangel. Mounted on the rocket is the Resurs 500 satellite and descent module, which will orbit Earth for about five days before splashing down in international waters about 200 miles off the coast of Washington state.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States' decision to withdraw from the Antiballistic Missile Treaty with Russia could threaten international stability by freeing other nations to end peace agreements, Russian Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov said Monday. After a meeting with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ivanov said the move would not unbalance U.S.-Russian relations.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning from meetings in Washington, Russian Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov said Friday that progress has been made toward a strategic-weapons understanding with the United States but that it is too early to suggest that an accord is about to be signed. Ivanov said "complicated consultations on offensive and defensive strategic weapons are currently being held." It is premature "to speak about any agreements," he said.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of heated internal wrangling, the Bush administration today intends to give Russia the outline of its plan for reducing U.S. offensive nuclear weapons, potentially opening the way for a breakthrough on its missile defense plan, according to administration officials. The deal could eliminate the possibility that the United States would abrogate the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, the cornerstone of international arms control treaties, according to U.S. and Russian sources.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the war against terrorism, the United States will become involved in economic development in Central Asia and in building closer economic ties with Russia, marking a new chapter for the world economy. Russia's quick support for U.S. policies and military needs in the wake of Sept. 11 has "defined" a new relationship between the two nations, Condoleezza Rice, national security advisor to President Bush, told a Washington meeting of the U.S.-Russia Business Council last week.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is considering various forms of cooperation with the United States in a possible military assault on terrorists based in Afghanistan and is conferring with its Central Asian allies, U.S. and Russian officials said Monday. "They have not ruled anything in or anything out," Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton said after meeting with top Russian officials here. Russia's cooperation could be critical to any U.S. military action in Afghanistan.
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top State Department official denied Wednesday that the Bush administration had issued an ultimatum to Russia stating when the U.S. would withdraw from the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty. But Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton reiterated at a news conference here that the U.S. will pull out of the treaty "sooner rather than later" if no agreement is reached with Russia.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. foreign affairs specialists are monitoring the potential for increased cooperation between Russia, China and India, amid a growing conviction in all three countries, especially after NATO's bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, that U.S. power must somehow be checked. Although agreeing that the three nations are far from coalescing into a pan-Eurasian, anti-NATO axis, the analysts remain concerned about what they call a nightmare scenario: an alliance that would bring together about 2.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is investigating a report by a Soviet newspaper that a U.S. airman, shot down in Vietnam in 1967, is living in Kazakhstan, the State Department said Wednesday. Department spokesman Richard Boucher said that the business newspaper Kommersant reported earlier this month that an American pilot, who was shot down on May 19, 1967, was brought to Alma Ata, the capital of Kazakhstan, in September, 1967.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior U.S. arms control official on Tuesday reiterated the Bush administration's wish for an agreement with Russia on amending the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty so that the United States would be freed to pursue its plans for a national missile defense. U.S. Undersecretary of State John R.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After meeting with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin in Moscow on Thursday, U.S. National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice briskly spelled out some of the elements of the new strategic relationship that the Bush administration wants with Russia. Under those ties, long, tortuous negotiations as to the number of nuclear weapons on each side would be a thing of the past.
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