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United States Foreign Relations Rwanda

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NEWS
March 26, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing bone-chilling eyewitness accounts and seeing scars from machete wounds on the head of a child, President Clinton said Wednesday that the United States and the rest of the world share the blame for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda because they did nothing while an estimated 800,000 people were killed. Speaking to a few hundred Rwandans, Clinton called the 3-month-long massacre "the most intensive slaughter in this blood-filled century we are about to leave."
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NEWS
March 26, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing bone-chilling eyewitness accounts and seeing scars from machete wounds on the head of a child, President Clinton said Wednesday that the United States and the rest of the world share the blame for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda because they did nothing while an estimated 800,000 people were killed. Speaking to a few hundred Rwandans, Clinton called the 3-month-long massacre "the most intensive slaughter in this blood-filled century we are about to leave."
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NEWS
August 16, 1997 | From the Washington Post
U.S. involvement with Rwanda's military has been far more extensive than previously disclosed, an internal Defense Department chronology shows. U.S. training in the war-torn Central African nation has included psychological operations and tactical special forces exercises that occurred a few weeks before the start of last fall's Rwandan-led insurgency in neighboring Congo, formerly Zaire, according to the eight-page draft document obtained by the Washington Post.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massacre earlier this month of at least 327 mostly Tutsi refugees by Hutu insurgents at a camp in northwestern Rwanda is "a resurgence of genocide," Clinton administration officials asserted Thursday. State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said the U.S. government will not act on its own but is prepared to assist in any international effort to bring the killers to justice.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massacre earlier this month of at least 327 mostly Tutsi refugees by Hutu insurgents at a camp in northwestern Rwanda is "a resurgence of genocide," Clinton administration officials asserted Thursday. State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said the U.S. government will not act on its own but is prepared to assist in any international effort to bring the killers to justice.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the numb and hollow-eyed gaze of the emaciated survivors of Treblinka or the mountains of skulls stacked up by Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, the shriek of pain of the people of Rwanda has seared itself onto the world's conscience.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | From the Washington Post
U.S. involvement with Rwanda's military has been far more extensive than previously disclosed, an internal Defense Department chronology shows. U.S. training in the war-torn Central African nation has included psychological operations and tactical special forces exercises that occurred a few weeks before the start of last fall's Rwandan-led insurgency in neighboring Congo, formerly Zaire, according to the eight-page draft document obtained by the Washington Post.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the numb and hollow-eyed gaze of the emaciated survivors of Treblinka or the mountains of skulls stacked up by Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, the shriek of pain of the people of Rwanda has seared itself onto the world's conscience.
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