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NEWS
May 24, 1995 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A senior U.S. envoy left here empty-handed Tuesday after failing to get Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to recognize Bosnia-Herzegovina, despite a week of intensive talks. Discussions between the Serbian president and Robert Frasure, the U.S. representative from the five-nation Contact Group, which is mediating among Bosnia's warring parties, hit a dead end when Milosevic again insisted on a full removal of economic sanctions in exchange for recognition of Bosnia's frontiers.
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NEWS
April 9, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the West, the latest incarnation of Adolf Hitler is Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, whose Serbian soldiers stand accused of massacring ethnic Albanians in Kosovo. But here in China, the man whose image was doctored to make him look like the Nazi dictator is none other than President Clinton. "The specter hovering over Kosovo," read the caption below the photo in Sunday's Yangcheng Evening News, a popular daily in southern China.
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NEWS
July 5, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh from their victory in the 40-year-old standoff between East and West, 300 soldiers from the U.S. Army's Berlin Brigade are coming here on a mission to stare down one of the greatest threats of the post-Cold War era. While the watchful presence of U.S. troops and their impressive array of military hardware caused communism to blink first in the protracted face-off with Western democracy, it is an open question whether the mere reputation of the U.S.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | PAUL WATSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Secretary of State Madeleine Albright struggled to salvage Kosovo peace talks, ethnic Albanian guerrillas and government forces battled Monday on two fronts in the Serbian province, sending refugees fleeing the new upsurge of fighting.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration and its allies are offering Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic both a carrot and a stick today in a diplomatic showdown over Bosnia-Herzegovina, senior U.S. and U.N. officials said Wednesday. The carrot is a quiet promise that the West will begin lifting economic sanctions on Serbia if Milosevic pushes the ethnic Serbs of Bosnia to sign a U.N. peace plan that would divide the republic into 10 ethnic provinces.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tacitly acknowledging that the Clinton administration blundered by setting a deadline that it couldn't keep for getting peacekeeping forces out of Bosnia, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Tuesday that if U.S. troops are sent to Kosovo, another Balkan hot spot, the commitment will be open-ended. "We really learned a lesson, I think, in Bosnia that setting an artificial deadline doesn't work," Albright said. Three years after a peace agreement was reached, U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding a prolonged, often-heated debate, the United States and five European nations agreed Monday to take limited punitive measures against Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic for his armed crackdown in the Serbian province of Kosovo and warned him to seek a political solution to the crisis immediately or face more sanctions.
NEWS
March 9, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright pushed European allies Sunday to act decisively to end the explosion of violence in the Serbian province of Kosovo, but on the eve of a crucial six-nation meeting on the issue here, it was far from clear that she will win agreement on the kind of tough measures she seeks.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
U.S. diplomats Thursday brought their campaign to end the war in the former Yugoslav federation to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, who was reported to generally favor the new U.S. plan. But ongoing warfare in the Balkans illustrated the obstacles to the pact. "Today's talks were extremely useful, they were very frank and they clarified some issues," U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke said after meeting with Milosevic for five hours.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will consider easing economic sanctions against Serbia if President Slobodan Milosevic keeps his vow to cut off all assistance to the Bosnian Serbs, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Tuesday. "We're going to be watching the situation very carefully because of the disappointment we had the last time that a similar intention was expressed," he told reporters on his return flight from a Middle East trip.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In more than two hours of intensive talks Sunday, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright urged Kosovo's rebels to shed their remaining reservations about an autonomy plan for the province, a step that would clear the way for NATO airstrikes on recalcitrant Serbs.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the United States and Serbia locked in a bitter face-off over a proposal to send NATO-led peacekeeping troops to Kosovo, the U.S. and European sponsors of the Balkan peace conference agreed Saturday to extend until Tuesday their deadline for completing the negotiations. The decision, made after the talks ran more than seven hours past a noon deadline that Washington had declared inviolate, was an embarrassment to the Clinton administration and to Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Despite Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's defiant "no" to the chief mediator at the Kosovo peace talks here, the British and French foreign ministers said Wednesday that they detected some progress. With less than three days to go to the Saturday noon deadline for reaching a three-year interim agreement between Serbs and Kosovo Albanians, Foreign Ministers Hubert Vedrine of France and Robin Cook of Britain said both sides showed signs of moving closer to a deal.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tacitly acknowledging that the Clinton administration blundered by setting a deadline that it couldn't keep for getting peacekeeping forces out of Bosnia, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Tuesday that if U.S. troops are sent to Kosovo, another Balkan hot spot, the commitment will be open-ended. "We really learned a lesson, I think, in Bosnia that setting an artificial deadline doesn't work," Albright said. Three years after a peace agreement was reached, U.S.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a day of whirlwind diplomacy, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright brought Serbian and ethnic Albanian negotiators together Sunday for their first face-to-face meeting, but an agreement between the two groups to end the crisis in the strife-torn Kosovo region remained a long way off.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With peace talks on Kosovo going nowhere after a sterile, frustrating week, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright flew in from Washington on Saturday night to warn Serbs and ethnic Albanians: Compromise or face the consequences. "If the Serbs are the cause of the breakdown, we're determined to go forward with the NATO decision to carry out airstrikes," said Albright's spokesman, James P. Rubin. At the White House, President Clinton announced that he wants to dispatch nearly 4,000 U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The enemy of your enemy may be your friend in most countries, but in Yugoslavia even animosity defies convention. Serbia on Tuesday tried to push through the federal Parliament a vote of no-confidence in Prime Minister Ante Markovic, whose efforts at preserving Yugoslavia as a united federation are opposed with equal fervor by both Communist and non-Communist republics.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In more than two hours of intensive talks Sunday, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright urged Kosovo's rebels to shed their remaining reservations about an autonomy plan for the province, a step that would clear the way for NATO airstrikes on recalcitrant Serbs.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Foreign mediators accused Serbs on Friday of preventing progress at the Kosovo peace talks and denied Serbian accusations of blocking direct meetings between the two sides. The chief mediator, U.S. envoy Christopher Hill, described the six days of negotiations so far between the Serbs and ethnic Albanians as "a very difficult process." "We are going to have to make a lot of progress in the days ahead," he said. U.S.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States lost its bid Wednesday to punish Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic for not fully meeting Western demands that he make peace in Kosovo, as European allies rejected an American push for an immediate freeze on his nation's overseas financial assets.
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