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United States Foreign Relations Singapore

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NEWS
January 16, 1998 | Associated Press
U.S. warships, including nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines, will be allowed free use of a new Singapore naval base when it opens in 2000, the government's defense minister said Thursday. Tony Tan Keng Yam, who also is Singapore's deputy prime minister, told a news conference after meeting with Defense Secretary William S. Cohen that U.S. ships will use a pier at the Changi naval base for liberty visits and resupply stops.
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NEWS
January 16, 1998 | Associated Press
U.S. warships, including nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines, will be allowed free use of a new Singapore naval base when it opens in 2000, the government's defense minister said Thursday. Tony Tan Keng Yam, who also is Singapore's deputy prime minister, told a news conference after meeting with Defense Secretary William S. Cohen that U.S. ships will use a pier at the Changi naval base for liberty visits and resupply stops.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
The Straits Times, Singapore's most prominent newspaper, gave South Coast Repertory's "You Never Can Tell" a mixed review. It called the production "well-crafted," the sets "superbly adaptable" and the costumes "charming." But the show "failed to engage the emotions." Richard Doyle was praised for his "commanding presence" and John-David Keller for his "poignant" performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996
Students from five Southern California schools are bound for Singapore after winning a competition Thursday addressing U.S.-Singapore relations. The Ambassador to Singapore competition, sponsored by The Los Angeles Times in Education and Singapore Airlines, is an educational exchange program between Singapore and the United States.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case likely to cause renewed acrimony between the United States and Singapore, a judge on Tuesday convicted an American scholar and senior executives of a U.S.-owned newspaper of contempt of court for publishing an article critical of the way some Asian governments suppress political opposition. The chief target of the prosecution, university lecturer Christopher Lingle, was fined nearly $7,000 for writing the article, but he is unlikely ever to be punished.
NEWS
July 17, 1988
Singapore released a lawyer and critic of the government who was detained in May after he met with a U.S. diplomat. The Home Affairs Ministry said Francis Seow, a former solicitor general and former president of Singapore's Law Society, was freed on condition that he not leave Singapore or associate with foreign diplomats. Seow was detained May 6 after he met with U.S. diplomats, including E. Mason Hendrickson, of the U.S. Embassy's political section.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As warmly as South Coast Repertory has been received here for its vibrant production of George Bernard Shaw's "You Never Can Tell," the contemporary Japanese dance company Sankai Juko made a bigger splash over the weekend at the opening of the Singapore Festival of Arts. The most obvious reason was that festival officials had promoted the five-man dance troupe as "erotic" and "shocking"--sensationalist hype picked up and flogged in the local press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996
Students from five Southern California schools are bound for Singapore after winning a competition Thursday addressing U.S.-Singapore relations. The Ambassador to Singapore competition, sponsored by The Los Angeles Times in Education and Singapore Airlines, is an educational exchange program between Singapore and the United States.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two months of anguished, international debate about crime and effective punishment, American teen-ager Michael P. Fay was lashed with four strokes of a rattan cane in a prison here Thursday for the crime of spraying paint on cars. Although widely expected since Fay's clemency appeal was turned down Wednesday, the execution of his sentence provoked outrage from his parents, and the State Department called in S. R. Nathan, the Singaporean ambassador to Washington, to express its displeasure.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case likely to cause renewed acrimony between the United States and Singapore, a judge on Tuesday convicted an American scholar and senior executives of a U.S.-owned newspaper of contempt of court for publishing an article critical of the way some Asian governments suppress political opposition. The chief target of the prosecution, university lecturer Christopher Lingle, was fined nearly $7,000 for writing the article, but he is unlikely ever to be punished.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singapore's government said early today that it had reprimanded two U.S. diplomats because of what it termed "false reports" about how much American teen-ager Michael P. Fay suffered during a flogging for vandalism. The two-month controversy about the Fay case, which has strained relations between the United States and one of its longtime allies, blossomed into a full-fledged war of words over news reports that the youth had been "bloodied" by the punishment.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two months of anguished, international debate about crime and effective punishment, American teen-ager Michael P. Fay was lashed with four strokes of a rattan cane in a prison here Thursday for the crime of spraying paint on cars. Although widely expected since Fay's clemency appeal was turned down Wednesday, the execution of his sentence provoked outrage from his parents, and the State Department called in S. R. Nathan, the Singaporean ambassador to Washington, to express its displeasure.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government said today that there is no reason to grant clemency to an American teen-ager sentenced to a flogging for spray-painting cars, but it announced that the punishment of six strokes of the rattan cane has been reduced to four as a "gesture" to President Clinton. A government statement said the Cabinet had reviewed the clemency appeal filed by lawyers for Michael P. Fay, 18, and "found no special circumstances which justify commuting the sentence of caning."
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | Reuters
President Clinton has made a new personal plea to Singapore President Ong Teng Cheong for clemency in the case of Michael Fay, an American youth who has been sentenced to be caned with a rattan rod for vandalism. White House aides said Friday that Clinton wrote to the Singapore president Tuesday urging that Fay not be caned. Fay was sentenced March 3 to six strokes of the cane, four months in jail and a fine of $2,000 for spray-painting cars and other offenses.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | Reuters
President Clinton has made a new personal plea to Singapore President Ong Teng Cheong for clemency in the case of Michael Fay, an American youth who has been sentenced to be caned with a rattan rod for vandalism. White House aides said Friday that Clinton wrote to the Singapore president Tuesday urging that Fay not be caned. Fay was sentenced March 3 to six strokes of the cane, four months in jail and a fine of $2,000 for spray-painting cars and other offenses.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a U.S. naval task force led by the carrier Midway steamed into Singapore's harbor last month on its way to the Middle East, it was an indication of the close military relationship that Washington enjoys with this tiny island nation. But the visit of several thousand U.S.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush arrives in Singapore tonight, his visit--the first by a U.S. President--will represent a gesture of American gratitude to this tiny nation for opening its arms to U.S. warships and airplanes at a time when virtually no one else in the region wants them. The Philippines only recently told the United States to withdraw the last of its naval forces from Subic Bay Naval Base within a year, marking the end of nearly a century of U.S. military presence in the country.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle and Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore signed an agreement today under which U.S. armed forces will have increased use of military bases in Singapore. "The agreement will permit the U.S. Air Force to send aircraft to Singapore several times each year on training deployments of several weeks each," a U.S. Embassy statement said. More U.S. Navy vessels will also visit. The statement said the increase will start in three to six months.
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