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United States Foreign Relations Somalia

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NEWS
January 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
The president of Somalia's transitional government said Friday that his people had been "terrorized" by a U.S. propaganda campaign portraying the country as a possible haven for Osama bin Laden's followers. President Abdiqassim Salad Hassan told Reuters television that fears of U.S. military strikes were hindering efforts to bring peace to the country, considered by Washington as a potential target in its war on terrorism.
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NEWS
January 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
The president of Somalia's transitional government said Friday that his people had been "terrorized" by a U.S. propaganda campaign portraying the country as a possible haven for Osama bin Laden's followers. President Abdiqassim Salad Hassan told Reuters television that fears of U.S. military strikes were hindering efforts to bring peace to the country, considered by Washington as a potential target in its war on terrorism.
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NEWS
June 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States began withdrawing most of its diplomats from Mogadishu as clan fighting rocked the Somali capital for a third straight day. The United Nations said casualties were heavy, and a U.N. official estimated that 30 people died in the first two days of clashes. Many of the victims were thought to be civilians caught in cross-fire. The State Department ordered the temporary evacuation of about 20 members of the U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crusted with garbage, festooned with litter, knee-deep in rusting junk, scavenged by packs of wild dogs, blown by dirty sand and scorched by unforgiving sun, a small part of this nation was given back to Somalis on Wednesday. And they were happy to have it. Some slipped in early and hid overnight in abandoned boxes. Hundreds more assembled outside the fence. Then, at dawn, as U.N. tanks retreated from the Mogadishu airport, Somalis swarmed in for a frenzy of looting and gunfighting.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | Associated Press
Ambassador Ismat Kittani, the United Nations' special representative to Somalia, arrived Sunday to begin his job in the conflict-ridden nation. Kittani's predecessor quit in a dispute with U.N. headquarters over his criticism of U.N. efforts to help Somalia's starving populace. The program has been plagued with delays, security problems and widespread looting.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of an influential African-American think tank called on the Clinton Administration on Thursday to "stay the course" in Somalia and reject growing demands from Capitol Hill for a hasty withdrawal of U.S. forces from the troubled African nation. At a press conference that marked the emergence of a potentially powerful constituency in support of American military involvement in Somalia, Randall Robinson, executive director of TransAfrica, said that the sudden removal of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1987 | United Press International
The Senate has confirmed Frank Crigler, a career foreign service officer, as U.S. ambassador to Somalia.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin said Friday the United States plans to bring its forces home from Somalia as soon as they have re-established adequate security in the country, but he provided no firm timetable for achieving that elusive goal. In a speech before a foreign policy group, Aspin said the roughly 4,600 American military personnel now in Somalia--including 1,600 combat soldiers and 3,000 logistics troops--would stay "long enough to complete their mission and no longer."
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crusted with garbage, festooned with litter, knee-deep in rusting junk, scavenged by packs of wild dogs, blown by dirty sand and scorched by unforgiving sun, a small part of this nation was given back to Somalis on Wednesday. And they were happy to have it. Some slipped in early and hid overnight in abandoned boxes. Hundreds more assembled outside the fence. Then, at dawn, as U.N. tanks retreated from the Mogadishu airport, Somalis swarmed in for a frenzy of looting and gunfighting.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans dug into the sand along a razor-wire perimeter of Mogadishu's beachfront Tuesday. On the other side of the wire coils, an eerie quiet settled over a violent landscape. "It would make anyone wonder if this is the calm before the storm," said Army Special Forces Maj. Bryan Whitman. Under a relentless tropical sun, about 1,800 U.S. Marines and 350 of their Italian counterparts consolidated their hold on the sand of Mogadishu, providing protection for the retreat of U.N.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans dug into the sand along a razor-wire perimeter of Mogadishu's beachfront Tuesday. On the other side of the wire coils, an eerie quiet settled over a violent landscape. "It would make anyone wonder if this is the calm before the storm," said Army Special Forces Maj. Bryan Whitman. Under a relentless tropical sun, about 1,800 U.S. Marines and 350 of their Italian counterparts consolidated their hold on the sand of Mogadishu, providing protection for the retreat of U.N.
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States began withdrawing most of its diplomats from Mogadishu as clan fighting rocked the Somali capital for a third straight day. The United Nations said casualties were heavy, and a U.N. official estimated that 30 people died in the first two days of clashes. Many of the victims were thought to be civilians caught in cross-fire. The State Department ordered the temporary evacuation of about 20 members of the U.S.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American military, which lost 18 troops trying to capture Mohammed Farah Aidid in early October, provided the Somali clan leader with an airplane and an escort Thursday to get him to peace talks in the Ethiopian capital, leaving Administration officials scrambling to explain the latest twist in America's tangled adventure in Somalia. Having failed to put Somalia back together by force, the Administration switched in October to conciliation.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is heading to Mogadishu this week convinced that he has helped President Clinton by serving as the scapegoat of the Somalia debacle, but sure that the President must embrace the United Nations again if he does not want to become "the sheriff of the world."
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin said Friday the United States plans to bring its forces home from Somalia as soon as they have re-established adequate security in the country, but he provided no firm timetable for achieving that elusive goal. In a speech before a foreign policy group, Aspin said the roughly 4,600 American military personnel now in Somalia--including 1,600 combat soldiers and 3,000 logistics troops--would stay "long enough to complete their mission and no longer."
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of an influential African-American think tank called on the Clinton Administration on Thursday to "stay the course" in Somalia and reject growing demands from Capitol Hill for a hasty withdrawal of U.S. forces from the troubled African nation. At a press conference that marked the emergence of a potentially powerful constituency in support of American military involvement in Somalia, Randall Robinson, executive director of TransAfrica, said that the sudden removal of U.S.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is heading to Mogadishu this week convinced that he has helped President Clinton by serving as the scapegoat of the Somalia debacle, but sure that the President must embrace the United Nations again if he does not want to become "the sheriff of the world."
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after the most aggressive operation since the United Nations arrived here to fend off starvation, U.N. troops on Friday continued hunting for Mohammed Farah Aidid even as U.N. officials sought to direct public focus away from the fugitive warlord. "Clearly, we have identified Aidid as a likely suspect in the atrocities of June 5," said retired U.S. Navy Adm. Jonathan Howe, the U.N.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after the most aggressive operation since the United Nations arrived here to fend off starvation, U.N. troops on Friday continued hunting for Mohammed Farah Aidid even as U.N. officials sought to direct public focus away from the fugitive warlord. "Clearly, we have identified Aidid as a likely suspect in the atrocities of June 5," said retired U.S. Navy Adm. Jonathan Howe, the U.N.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Thursday that the attacks that U.N. forces have been conducting against Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid during the past six days are over, but he warned that the allies will remain poised to move again if provoked by Aidid or other warlords. His statements came after U.S. and U.N. forces mounted fierce new attacks against Aidid's headquarters in Mogadishu that took the lives of six U.N. peacekeepers and wounded 43 more. Only one U.S.
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