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United States Foreign Relations South Africa

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NEWS
June 23, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson Mandela's provocative statement of support for Moammar Kadafi, Fidel Castro and Yasser Arafat has surprised and disturbed the Bush Administration, complicating a presidential meeting that is the main event of Mandela's triumphant U.S. tour. Although Mandela's sentiments had long been known, his strong expression of them in a television interview called attention to tensions between blacks and Jews in the domestic political scene.
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NEWS
April 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
South African officials are seeking the return of a former flight student who was detained on immigration charges after his name was found on a document in a cave in Afghanistan. Issaya Nombo, 44, was arrested Monday by federal officials in North Carolina and was being held for overstaying his visa after finishing a pilot training course in Florida. Federal officials have said they had no evidence to suggest Nombo was involved in terrorist activity.
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NEWS
October 12, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
A former civilian operations analyst at the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland pleaded guilty Tuesday to spying for South Africa in the first espionage case involving that country to be prosecuted in the United States. In the plea in federal court in Baltimore, Thomas Joseph Dolce, 49, admitted providing a South African military attache with classified ballistic research information. The espionage case was the second uncovered at the Aberdeen facility this year. Other Alleged Spying U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hearing about the shortage of blood supplies in the New York area, scores of South Africans also offered to donate blood. Condemnation of the attacks came from South African organizations across the board. The South African Jewish Board of Deputies expressed shock and horror at what it described as "barbaric terror attacks." "This abominable crime was not just an attack on one nation, but on all humanity, and indeed on the very fabric of civilization itself," the organization said.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nelson Mandela, whose sacrifices for black liberation in South Africa have made him a legend at home and abroad, was cheered Wednesday by hundreds of thousands of exuberant New Yorkers, serenaded by choirs and showered with a paper blizzard in a historic ride up Broadway's "Canyon of Heroes" as he began his first visit to America.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, saying his widely used fair-employment principles have failed to bring an end to South Africa's apartheid, called on nearly 200 American businesses Wednesday to pull out of that nation within nine months. Sullivan, a Philadelphia Baptist minister whose 10-year-old code of conduct has become the standard for U.S. companies in South Africa, also said he wants the U.S. government to enact an economic embargo against South Africa.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hinting broadly at an extraordinary snub of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday that he is reluctant to change his Middle East peace proposals in response to Israeli demands because that would only produce other demands from the Arabs.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., South Africa Sign Business Pacts: Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and her South African counterpart, Pik Botha, presided over a ceremony in Pretoria where American and local executives signed agreements worth at least $50 million. O'Leary and Botha signed four business, energy and economic agreements between their countries that will lead to the creation of almost 2,000 jobs. The agreements form part of Washington's support of black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will send Peace Corps volunteers here for the first time next year in a show of support for South Africa's fledgling democracy, Vice President Al Gore said Tuesday. Gore and other senior Clinton administration officials made a whirlwind 36-hour visit here for the first substantive meeting of the U.S.-South African Binational Commission, a Cabinet-level panel created in March to cement and expand post-apartheid ties between Washington and Pretoria.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State Warren Christopher met South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha and offered U.S. help in negotiations on a transition to democracy and majority rule due to resume next month. Botha, a former South African ambassador to the United Nations and the world's longest-serving foreign minister, noted that he had met several of Christopher's predecessors in the past 15 years.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its Cold War allies encouraged South Africa's former white regime to develop a chemical and biological warfare program that investigators here say veered out of control and targeted the country's own black population, according to testimony Friday by the program's director. Dr. Wouter Basson, the general who headed the top-secret project from its inception in 1981, also said that U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exhibiting the moral authority he draws from his extraordinary personal history, South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday pointedly told President Clinton to follow his lead and negotiate face-to-face with his enemies to solve conflicts peacefully. Mandela added that he intends to remain "loyal" to old friends--such as Cuba and Libya--even if it displeases the Clinton administration.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first government chosen by all South Africa's people welcomed the first U.S. president ever to visit the country Thursday, and President Clinton marked the historic moment by pledging to help preserve the new "truly free" South Africa. "Simply put, America wants a strong South Africa, America needs a strong South Africa, and we are determined to work with you as you build a strong South Africa," Clinton said in an address before the country's Parliament and President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States lifted a 35-year-old arms embargo against South Africa, Vice President Al Gore and South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki said in a joint statement. "This will take effect immediately through the suspension of debarment of South African companies which had been prohibited from U.S. defense trade," the statement said.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and South Africa agree on just about everything, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki said Saturday. Except for Sudan. Except for Libya. Albright met Mbeki, President Nelson Mandela's heir apparent, to dramatize the generally good relations between the United States and post-apartheid South Africa.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | From Reuters
Vice President Al Gore toured the island prison Sunday where South African President Nelson Mandela was incarcerated for 18 years, calling prisoners' tales a source of inspiration for the world. Hosted by South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, whose father, Govan Mbeki, was imprisoned in the cell next to Mandela's, Gore made the half-hour boat trip from Cape Town to Robben Island and walked the narrow corridor to cell No. 5, a tiny concrete room barely big enough for a bed.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The United States welcomed South Africa's decision Thursday to lift emergency rule in most areas but said it still has not fulfilled the conditions necessary for Washington to lift economic sanctions against the white-minority government.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that while U.S. law does not permit him to lift economic sanctions imposed on South Africa by the United States, he would like to find some way to encourage South African President Frederik W. de Klerk's "new approach" in that racially divided nation.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to defuse a bitter dispute with Washington, President Nelson Mandela's Cabinet deferred a decision Wednesday on whether to allow a $640-million sale of sensitive weapons technology to Syria's dictatorial regime. U.S. diplomats said privately they believe that the move effectively killed the sale, which would have supplied sophisticated, laser-guided targeting and firing systems for hundreds of aging Soviet-made T-72 battle tanks in Syria's arsenal.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States fired a harsh verbal warning at South Africa on Monday, threatening to cut off economic aid if the nation's leaders go ahead with reported plans to sell military equipment to Syria. Calling the matter one of "very serious concern," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said that U.S. law prohibits recipients of American aid from selling arms to nations that it has identified as supporting international terrorism.
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