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NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military issued a public apology for dumping formaldehyde into the Han River, a main source of drinking water for Seoul's 12 million people. It was the first public apology issued by the U.S. military in South Korea since its deployment here in the Korean War. Earlier this month, the military admitted releasing 20 gallons of formaldehyde into the Han River in February. The U.S.
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NEWS
May 5, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With frustration mounting in the two Koreas over the Bush administration's slow pace in crafting a North Korea policy and apparent reluctance to negotiate with the Stalinist regime, Seoul and Pyongyang sent a not-so-subtle message to Washington this week: If you're not willing to provide diplomatic leadership, we'll ask Europe to pick up some of the slack.
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September 3, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waving the flags of both their native and adopted lands, about 150 Korean Americans on Monday welcomed South Korean President Kim Young Sam and his wife to Los Angeles during their brief stopover en route to a historic, five-nation state visit to Latin America. Kim and first lady Sohn Myung Soon, whose ties to Southern California go back years, later met with a select gathering of 650 Korean Americans at a reception Monday evening at the Century Plaza Hotel.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung's visit to Washington has brought forth the first significant change by the Bush administration in U.S. policy toward Asia. With a few brief remarks by President Bush on Wednesday and further explanations by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Thursday, the new administration threw cold water on the Clinton administration's efforts last fall to bring about a speedy rapprochement with the Communist regime in North Korea. "What the president was saying . . .
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Although the United States believes that South Korea's political system "doesn't seem to be working," American diplomats "cannot play a brokerage role" in pursuing reform, an American official said Thursday. "Legitimacy, effectiveness and fairness" in government are the key issues between the ruling party and the opposition, the official, who insisted that he not be further identified, said in an interview.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will try to settle the controversy over the U.S. Army's killing of civilians in the Korean War by offering South Korea a statement of regret rather than an apology, and a scholarship fund rather than compensation to the families of victims, officials said Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and South Korea's popular president, Kim Dae Jung, met Friday for lunch and a low-key working session largely devoted to divining the latest rumblings and threats from North Korea. Kim's one-day visit to Washington came as the mercurial regime in the North has once again raised military tensions on the combustible Korean peninsula--and raised hackles among policymakers in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration said Wednesday that it supports South Korea's policy of working toward reconciliation with communist North Korea. The administration is still mulling its own policy toward Pyongyang, including exactly how to follow through on initiatives inherited from the Clinton administration. Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the face of it, there are a number of reasons why today's summit in Washington between President Bush and South Korean President Kim Dae Jung should have its share of awkward moments. For one thing, the Bush administration has signaled that Kim's "sunshine policy" of engagement with North Korea is too soft on the North and doesn't demand enough in return.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United States could offer economic and diplomatic benefits to North Korea for access to a suspected North Korean nuclear weapons site, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung proposed Monday. Kim made the proposal during a meeting with William J. Perry, the newly appointed U.S. government policy coordinator on North Korea. The former U.S. defense minister arrived Sunday on a three-nation Asia tour, which includes stops in Tokyo and Beijing.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told South Korean President Kim Dae Jung on Wednesday that he is skeptical about North Korea's commitment to current and future arms deals and said he won't soon reopen negotiations with the Communist regime in Pyongyang to curb its long-range missile program.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the face of it, there are a number of reasons why today's summit in Washington between President Bush and South Korean President Kim Dae Jung should have its share of awkward moments. For one thing, the Bush administration has signaled that Kim's "sunshine policy" of engagement with North Korea is too soft on the North and doesn't demand enough in return.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration said Wednesday that it supports South Korea's policy of working toward reconciliation with communist North Korea. The administration is still mulling its own policy toward Pyongyang, including exactly how to follow through on initiatives inherited from the Clinton administration. Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and South Korea agreed Thursday to strengthen Seoul's jurisdiction over GIs charged with murder and rape in a bid to resolve one of the allies' most contentious issues. Under the deal, U.S. military personnel accused in cases of murder and rape as well as arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes will be turned over to South Korea after they are indicted. Currently, the hand-over occurs only if suspects are convicted and all appeals are exhausted.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will try to settle the controversy over the U.S. Army's killing of civilians in the Korean War by offering South Korea a statement of regret rather than an apology, and a scholarship fund rather than compensation to the families of victims, officials said Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. and South Korean negotiators have reached a "mutual understanding" that American soldiers killed South Korean civilian refugees in the early weeks of the Korean War, but they left unresolved the question of how many died, a Clinton administration official said Friday. The talks, which ended Thursday in Seoul with no publicly announced result, produced agreement from both sides that U.S.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States agreed to transfer custody of U.S. military personnel charged with crimes in South Korea to Korean authorities at the time of indictment, revising a controversial military pact that has helped stoke anti-American sentiment. Under the old agreement, U.S. service personnel accused of crimes could remain in American custody until their trials in South Korean courts ended. The agreement came at the end of two days of talks in Seoul, the capital.
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Defense Secretary William J. Perry will visit Japan and South Korea for three days beginning Sunday to discuss bilateral and regional security issues, the Pentagon said. The visit is tied to a trip by President Clinton to those countries next week. Perry will discuss the problem of U.S. bases on the island of Okinawa while in Japan, and rising tensions on the Korean peninsula in both nations, defense officials said privately.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States agreed to transfer custody of U.S. military personnel charged with crimes in South Korea to Korean authorities at the time of indictment, revising a controversial military pact that has helped stoke anti-American sentiment. Under the old agreement, U.S. service personnel accused of crimes could remain in American custody until their trials in South Korean courts ended. The agreement came at the end of two days of talks in Seoul, the capital.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Armed with rocks and bamboo staffs, students and farmers attacked club-wielding police and wrote protest messages in blood Tuesday in one of the biggest anti-U.S. demonstrations since South Korean President Kim Dae Jung took office in 1998. Police said about 14,000 protesters massed for the demonstration, which criticized the South Korean government as well as the United States.
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