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United States Foreign Relations South Korea

NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States agreed to transfer custody of U.S. military personnel charged with crimes in South Korea to Korean authorities at the time of indictment, revising a controversial military pact that has helped stoke anti-American sentiment. Under the old agreement, U.S. service personnel accused of crimes could remain in American custody until their trials in South Korean courts ended. The agreement came at the end of two days of talks in Seoul, the capital.
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NEWS
July 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Armed with rocks and bamboo staffs, students and farmers attacked club-wielding police and wrote protest messages in blood Tuesday in one of the biggest anti-U.S. demonstrations since South Korean President Kim Dae Jung took office in 1998. Police said about 14,000 protesters massed for the demonstration, which criticized the South Korean government as well as the United States.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military issued a public apology for dumping formaldehyde into the Han River, a main source of drinking water for Seoul's 12 million people. It was the first public apology issued by the U.S. military in South Korea since its deployment here in the Korean War. Earlier this month, the military admitted releasing 20 gallons of formaldehyde into the Han River in February. The U.S.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-standing public irritation at the behavior of the U.S. military in South Korea has found a new lightning rod: the legal system for American soldiers who commit crimes here. So angry is the mood here that one of South Korea's largest newspapers, the Joong Ang Ilbo, carried a front-page cartoon last week depicting a group of grinning GIs being escorted by U.S. military police officers back to the safety of their base, leaving behind a beaten Korean lying in the street.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korean War's battles ended almost five decades ago, but this village not far from Seoul has been under constant siege ever since--not by North Korea, but from U.S. bombs and machine-gun fire. Nearly every weekday morning, when the wind is calm, the sounds of war commence, often lasting well into the night. U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt antitank planes swoop down like vultures, unleashing their hail of bullets in a terrifying clamor at targets on the edge of rice paddies.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. and South Korean officials said Friday that they have no intention of withdrawing any of the 37,000 American troops stationed on the divided Korean peninsula, despite the improved prospects for lasting peace in the region. But in a sign of the continued thaw on the world's last major Cold War frontier, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright hinted that she may meet with North Korea's foreign minister at an Asia security conference next month.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of the U.S. Army met with alleged survivors of a reported mass killing of refugees by American soldiers during the Korean War and promised a thorough investigation. Army Secretary Louis Caldera made the pledge when he visited No Gun Ri, a hamlet in South Korea where alleged survivors say American soldiers killed hundreds of refugees in the first weeks of the Korean War in 1950. Caldera's first visit to No Gun Ri was part of a U.S. government inquiry.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and South Korea's popular president, Kim Dae Jung, met Friday for lunch and a low-key working session largely devoted to divining the latest rumblings and threats from North Korea. Kim's one-day visit to Washington came as the mercurial regime in the North has once again raised military tensions on the combustible Korean peninsula--and raised hackles among policymakers in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
North and South Korea have opened a new phase in their peace talks, beginning their first substantive negotiations with China and the United States after more than a year of meetings to lay the groundwork. "We actually had good, substantive discussions," U.S. special envoy Charles Kartman said in Geneva. Kartman said delegates would work in two committees--one to reduce tensions on the Korean peninsula and the other to decide how to put in place a permanent peace. A U.S.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In marked contrast with recent grim U.S. reports, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, citing what he said were "positive" signals coming out of North Korea, sounded an upbeat note Friday about the possibility of a rapprochement with his nation's rogue neighbor.
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