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United States Foreign Relations South Korea

NEWS
December 29, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and South Korea agreed Thursday to strengthen Seoul's jurisdiction over GIs charged with murder and rape in a bid to resolve one of the allies' most contentious issues. Under the deal, U.S. military personnel accused in cases of murder and rape as well as arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes will be turned over to South Korea after they are indicted. Currently, the hand-over occurs only if suspects are convicted and all appeals are exhausted.
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NEWS
December 22, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will try to settle the controversy over the U.S. Army's killing of civilians in the Korean War by offering South Korea a statement of regret rather than an apology, and a scholarship fund rather than compensation to the families of victims, officials said Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. and South Korean negotiators have reached a "mutual understanding" that American soldiers killed South Korean civilian refugees in the early weeks of the Korean War, but they left unresolved the question of how many died, a Clinton administration official said Friday. The talks, which ended Thursday in Seoul with no publicly announced result, produced agreement from both sides that U.S.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States agreed to transfer custody of U.S. military personnel charged with crimes in South Korea to Korean authorities at the time of indictment, revising a controversial military pact that has helped stoke anti-American sentiment. Under the old agreement, U.S. service personnel accused of crimes could remain in American custody until their trials in South Korean courts ended. The agreement came at the end of two days of talks in Seoul, the capital.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Armed with rocks and bamboo staffs, students and farmers attacked club-wielding police and wrote protest messages in blood Tuesday in one of the biggest anti-U.S. demonstrations since South Korean President Kim Dae Jung took office in 1998. Police said about 14,000 protesters massed for the demonstration, which criticized the South Korean government as well as the United States.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military issued a public apology for dumping formaldehyde into the Han River, a main source of drinking water for Seoul's 12 million people. It was the first public apology issued by the U.S. military in South Korea since its deployment here in the Korean War. Earlier this month, the military admitted releasing 20 gallons of formaldehyde into the Han River in February. The U.S.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-standing public irritation at the behavior of the U.S. military in South Korea has found a new lightning rod: the legal system for American soldiers who commit crimes here. So angry is the mood here that one of South Korea's largest newspapers, the Joong Ang Ilbo, carried a front-page cartoon last week depicting a group of grinning GIs being escorted by U.S. military police officers back to the safety of their base, leaving behind a beaten Korean lying in the street.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Historian John W. Dower, in his award-winning book about Japan at the end of World War II, "Embracing Defeat," recalls the antipathy with which some Japanese viewed the arriving American occupation forces. "Not you . . . not you. . . . It was not you we were waiting for," wrote the Japanese intellectual Dazai Osamu, according to Dower's account. As President Clinton visits Okinawa this week, the huge strategic questions that underlie his trip are these: Will U.S.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korean War's battles ended almost five decades ago, but this village not far from Seoul has been under constant siege ever since--not by North Korea, but from U.S. bombs and machine-gun fire. Nearly every weekday morning, when the wind is calm, the sounds of war commence, often lasting well into the night. U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt antitank planes swoop down like vultures, unleashing their hail of bullets in a terrifying clamor at targets on the edge of rice paddies.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. and South Korean officials said Friday that they have no intention of withdrawing any of the 37,000 American troops stationed on the divided Korean peninsula, despite the improved prospects for lasting peace in the region. But in a sign of the continued thaw on the world's last major Cold War frontier, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright hinted that she may meet with North Korea's foreign minister at an Asia security conference next month.
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