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United States Foreign Relations Southeast Asia

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NEWS
July 26, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Malaysia on Friday to begin talks on how to defuse the Cambodian crisis, an effort that U.S. officials now concede may be prolonged and whose results may not be fully realized until scheduled parliamentary elections next year. Albright will meet over the next three days with counterparts in the Assn.
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NEWS
June 1, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nuclear tests in South Asia have confronted the Clinton administration with a dilemma over whether to help India and Pakistan develop safety measures for their dangerous new devices, a move that could open the United States to charges of spreading nuclear know-how. The dilemma is just one measure of how radically the political landscape in South Asia has been transformed after the series of nuclear tests carried out last month by India and Pakistan.
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NEWS
June 1, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nuclear tests in South Asia have confronted the Clinton administration with a dilemma over whether to help India and Pakistan develop safety measures for their dangerous new devices, a move that could open the United States to charges of spreading nuclear know-how. The dilemma is just one measure of how radically the political landscape in South Asia has been transformed after the series of nuclear tests carried out last month by India and Pakistan.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic fallout from India's and Pakistan's decisions to go overtly nuclear has begun to descend on the two countries, among the world's poorest, and could become enormously damaging. India, home to more impoverished and illiterate people than any other nation, could be stripped of up to $20 billion in U.S. and international loans and aid, according to estimates from the White House. The country's already lagging growth rate may be slashed in half, Indian economists say.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan on Friday said Thailand's economic crisis showed that governments must provide investors with complete and timely economic and financial information and called for international financial institutions to force the issue. In one of his first public comments on the Southeast Asian currency crisis, Greenspan told central bankers and economists at the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank's annual symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyo.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III came to the defense of Japan on Saturday after a top Southeast Asian official voiced fears that growing Japanese power plus friction between Washington and Tokyo could threaten the security of the region. The issue was raised by Foreign Minister Abu Hassan Omar of Malaysia during a closed-door meeting here of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations. Citing the decline in East-West tensions and some U.S.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, responding to complaints that the West is losing its compassion for Indochinese refugees, told Southeast Asian foreign ministers Thursday that the United States will continue to provide homes for "substantial numbers" of displaced persons. In a speech to the opening session of the annual dialogue between the Assn.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Friday that the selection of an aging hard-liner to be the new premier of Vietnam "seems to snuff out" hope for an early end to Hanoi's occupation of Cambodia. "It's a rather discouraging matter," Shultz said after two days of consultations with the foreign ministers of the six countries that make up the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle, winding up a two-week tour of Asia that concentrated on U.S. security issues, plans to meet today with officials of four Southeast Asian nations in a bid to revive U.S. policy toward Cambodia. Quayle will meet with representatives of Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia shortly after arriving in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital, a senior U.S. official traveling with the vice president said.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan on Friday said Thailand's economic crisis showed that governments must provide investors with complete and timely economic and financial information and called for international financial institutions to force the issue. In one of his first public comments on the Southeast Asian currency crisis, Greenspan told central bankers and economists at the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank's annual symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyo.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a confrontation with an increasingly important ally, the United States on Monday bluntly castigated Malaysia on highly sensitive economic and diplomatic issues during Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's final day of talks with leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN. Senior U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Malaysia on Friday to begin talks on how to defuse the Cambodian crisis, an effort that U.S. officials now concede may be prolonged and whose results may not be fully realized until scheduled parliamentary elections next year. Albright will meet over the next three days with counterparts in the Assn.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
The nations of Southeast Asia signed a treaty that stakes out a huge nuclear-free zone, demonstrating the vibrant region's growing self-confidence but drawing objections from the U.S. and China. The treaty, signed at the end of a summit of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, bans the possession, manufacture and acquisition of nuclear weapons in an area stretching from Myanmar and Vietnam in the north to Indonesia in the south. The five nuclear powers, led by the U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe has the Conference on Security and Cooperation. The Western Hemisphere has the Organization of American States. But as the recent nuclear crisis in North Korea demonstrated, when security problems boil over in Asia, there is no regional forum where countries can seek a peaceful solution. Since the 1980s, a number of Southeast Asian nations have been pressing the big powers to join them in a semi-permanent conference to discuss security matters.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration assured apprehensive Southeast Asian democracies Monday that the United States will maintain its current military presence in the region, despite its push to cut U.S. troop strength in Europe, and that it will move to enhance American military capability in South Korea. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told foreign ministers of countries belonging to the Assn.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in Indonesia on Thursday, seeking to deflect an extraordinary outpouring of criticism from Southeast Asian nations angry over current U.S. policies toward Indochina. Over the next three days, Baker is scheduled to meet with leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the regional organization that includes the six non-Communist nations of Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand and Brunei.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived Tuesday for a meeting of Southeast Asian nations at which Japan is emphasizing more than ever before its differences with the United States, both on human rights questions and on defense policy. At the annual conference of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan seized the initiative by proposing an enhanced security role for ASEAN--a suggestion that met with a cool response from the United States.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived Tuesday for a meeting of Southeast Asian nations at which Japan is emphasizing more than ever before its differences with the United States, both on human rights questions and on defense policy. At the annual conference of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan seized the initiative by proposing an enhanced security role for ASEAN--a suggestion that met with a cool response from the United States.
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