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United States Foreign Relations Sudan

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NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House abandoned a major economic weapon against renegade nations Wednesday and said the United States would no longer restrict their purchase of American food, medicine and medical supplies. The announcement marks a major departure in U.S. economic, foreign and farm policy. As a result, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea and Sudan could eventually gain access to U.S. supplies, which have been largely off limits.
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NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudan ordered the expulsion of a U.S. diplomat, accusing him of discussing security issues with dissidents who the government said were planning an armed uprising. Glenn Warren has 72 hours to leave the country, Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail said in Khartoum, the Sudanese capital. Warren was detained briefly Wednesday for observing a meeting of the National Democratic Alliance, an umbrella organization for opposition groups. Seven Sudanese opposition leaders were arrested and held.
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NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudan ordered the expulsion of a U.S. diplomat, accusing him of discussing security issues with dissidents who the government said were planning an armed uprising. Glenn Warren has 72 hours to leave the country, Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail said in Khartoum, the Sudanese capital. Warren was detained briefly Wednesday for observing a meeting of the National Democratic Alliance, an umbrella organization for opposition groups. Seven Sudanese opposition leaders were arrested and held.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, after a meeting here Saturday with Sudanese rebel leader John Garang, said she will renew U.S. discouragement of investment in Sudan's fledgling oil industry. Canadian, Malaysian and Chinese firms are cooperating in the operation of a pipeline exporting oil from newly developed fields in Sudan, where a brutal civil war has been raging for 16 years. The U.S. government has prohibited American firms from investing.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | Associated Press
The United States is pulling all its diplomats and government personnel out of Sudan because they are vulnerable to terrorist attack and the Khartoum government has refused to guarantee their safety, the State Department announced Wednesday night. About 30 U.S. Embassy staff members and their families will depart by commercial airline "over the next few days," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said. About 2,100 U.S. citizens living in Sudan are also being urged to exit.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former President Jimmy Carter has returned to Sudan to try to secure an extension of a cease-fire, set to end July 28, that he negotiated in March. The official Sudan News Agency said Carter was met in Khartoum by Sudanese Health Minister Gatlouk Deng. Carter negotiated a cease-fire four months ago between the government of President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir and the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | Associated Press
President Bush has nominated Donald K. Petterson, formerly ambassador to Tanzania and Somalia, to be the new U.S. ambassador to Sudan, the White House has announced. If confirmed by the Senate, Petterson will succeed James Richard Cheek.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | United Press International
In the wake of large anti-U.S. and pro-Iraqi demonstrations in Sudan, the State Department on Friday authorized embassy dependents to leave the country and warned American private citizens to leave. The revolutionary military government of Lt. Gen. Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir has sided with Iraq in the Persian Gulf crisis. Well-managed demonstrations have been reported in cities including the capital, Khartoum.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | Associated Press
The State Department cautioned U.S. citizens Thursday to postpone non-essential travel to Sudan, where large demonstrations against the United States and in favor of Iraq have taken place.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | From Reuters
The United States said Thursday it had contacted anti-government guerrillas in Sudan in a bid to help free three American teachers and a British nurse abducted in southern Sudan. Gunmen claiming to belong to the Sudan People's Liberation Army kidnaped Americans Steve Anderson, Katherine Taylor and Mark Nikkel along with Briton Heather Sinclair on Tuesday. "We are in contact with representatives of the SPLA.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House abandoned a major economic weapon against renegade nations Wednesday and said the United States would no longer restrict their purchase of American food, medicine and medical supplies. The announcement marks a major departure in U.S. economic, foreign and farm policy. As a result, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea and Sudan could eventually gain access to U.S. supplies, which have been largely off limits.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Whipping up popular anger over a U.S. missile strike, President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir said Saturday that Sudanese are prepared to die in a holy war. "America is attacking us because we are guardians of Islam," Bashir told a crowd of at least 5,000 people who rallied in a square outside his offices in central Khartoum. "We have tasted the sweet flavor of jihad [holy war] and martyrdom, and what we seek now is to die for the sake of God," Bashir said. "Go! Go!
NEWS
November 5, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Tuesday that it is imposing a near-total embargo on trade with and investment in Sudan for what the State Department says is the radical Islamic government's support of terrorism, persecution of minority religions and tolerance of the slave trade. Under the sweeping new sanctions, announced by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, all export-import transactions are prohibited, and U.S.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | Associated Press
The United States is pulling all its diplomats and government personnel out of Sudan because they are vulnerable to terrorist attack and the Khartoum government has refused to guarantee their safety, the State Department announced Wednesday night. About 30 U.S. Embassy staff members and their families will depart by commercial airline "over the next few days," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said. About 2,100 U.S. citizens living in Sudan are also being urged to exit.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | United Press International
Three Americans and a Briton held captive for seven weeks were freed Tuesday by Sudanese rebels who said they were honoring a personal appeal by former President Jimmy Carter. They were flown to Nairobi on Tuesday evening after they were freed near the Kenya-Sudan border earlier in the day. "We are doing fine," Steve Anderson, 31, said after he and fellow Americans Katherine Taylor, 32, and Mark Nikkel, 37, of Reedley, Calif., arrived here with Heather Sinclair, 29, of Belfast, Northern Ireland.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former President Jimmy Carter has returned to Sudan to try to secure an extension of a cease-fire, set to end July 28, that he negotiated in March. The official Sudan News Agency said Carter was met in Khartoum by Sudanese Health Minister Gatlouk Deng. Carter negotiated a cease-fire four months ago between the government of President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir and the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sudan's military ruler dismissed accusations by Washington that his country supports international terrorism as "political bias" and said it only advocates Islam. By adding Sudan to its list of countries supporting terrorism, Washington severed Sudan from its assistance programs, with the exception of humanitarian aid.
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