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May 1, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American hostage Frank H. Reed was released Monday night from more than 3 1/2 years of captivity in Lebanon and turned over to U.S. authorities in Damascus. Reed's release came just eight days after the freeing of another American hostage, Robert Polhill, 55, a former accountant and business professor at Beirut University College. After being examined by a Syrian doctor at the U.S. ambassador's residence, Reed was flown by a medically equipped U.S.
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NEWS
June 11, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For six U.S. presidents, from Richard Nixon to Bill Clinton, Hafez Assad posed a perplexing foreign policy challenge as the man standing in the way of a comprehensive Arab-Israeli peace agreement. Sometimes, Assad came tantalizingly close to making a deal--but he always pulled back. William B.
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he will "work closely with" any country willing to oppose Iraq, President Bush met here Friday with President Hafez Assad of Syria, a country the Administration has publicly labeled a major supporter of international terrorism.
NEWS
March 27, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton failed to break a negotiating deadlock Sunday between Israel and Syria despite a rare face-to-face meeting with Syrian President Hafez Assad in Geneva that stretched over three hours. "The differences [between Israel and Syria] are significant and important, and obviously more work needs to be done in order to bridge them," a somber White House spokesman told reporters after the president flew home late Sunday.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Iraqi Scud missile that crashes into Tel Aviv echoes politically here in Damascus, testing Syria's determination to stand with the allied forces in the Persian Gulf War. But President Hafez Assad's regime calculates that it has nothing to gain--and plenty to lose--by getting dragged into an Arab-Israeli conflict engineered by Saddam Hussein. It's furious at Hussein's attempts to light the fuse and scrambling to stamp it out.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel's confidence that the global focus on the Persian Gulf conflict would improve its relations with the United States has given way to pervasive anger at the Bush Administration for being kept at arm's length during the crisis. Mistrust deepened during President Bush's trip last week to Saudi Arabia and Egypt and because of his meeting with Syrian President Hafez Assad in Switzerland. Bush skipped Israel on his tour of the Middle East, as did Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Tuesday flatly rejected Iranian suggestions that the "ball is now in the American court" in the hostage stalemate. "The ball has always been in their court," Bush Administration spokesman Marlin Fitzwater insisted. "It will be as long as there are hostages yet to be released." The Administration response reflects President Bush's strategy of maintaining a relatively low profile on the issue and keeping attention focused on Iran and its Lebanese Shiite Muslim allies.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Syrian officials have notified the United States to expect the release of another American hostage by Friday, barring unforeseen circumstances and delays of the sort that accompanied Robert Polhill's release, a Bush Administration source said Monday. The source said he does not know if the alert involves one of the two Americans still held by the Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of Palestine, the group that released Polhill on Sunday. Other militant Islamic groups hold five other Americans.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish insurgents in northern Iraq claimed further territorial gains Tuesday and accused the Baghdad regime of taking civilian hostages to stall their advances in oil-rich Kirkuk province. Jalal Talabani, a top official of the dissident Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, told reporters in Beirut that the alleged hostage-taking has "seriously hindered the liberation" of the province from forces loyal to President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Secretary of State James A. Baker III's meetings with Syrian President Hafez Assad aim to persuade Syria to join efforts for peace with Israel and the Mideast. But a record of terrorism in Syria poses problems: WHAT BAKER WANTS FROM SYRIA In addition to peace with Israel, Baker wants: * Syria to help obtain freedom for 6 Americans and other Western hostages held by radicals in a Syrian-dominated part of Lebanon. * Syria to contribute troops to a peacekeeping force in the Gulf.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | By JOHN DANISZEWSKI,
For decades, the goal of forging a comprehensive Middle East peace has been the diplomatic Holy Grail for U.S. leaders. Now, with his second term ebbing fast, President Clinton has what may be his last best chance to bring about peace between Israel and its chief remaining Arab adversary.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what could be the first crack in a 2 1/2-month freeze in talks between Syria and Israel, President Clinton and Syrian President Hafez Assad plan to meet Sunday in Switzerland to discuss how to revive the stalled U.S.-sponsored negotiations. Clinton announced the surprise summit with the Syrian head of state at a news conference in Bangladesh, during the first leg of his six-day journey to South Asia. He said the meeting with Assad will take place on his way home.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Shareh held face-to-face talks Friday for only the second time as the fifth day of the Middle East peace talks plodded toward an inconclusive end. President Clinton, who met alone with Barak and Shareh for about 40 minutes, handed them a U.S.-drafted document outlining issues on which the antagonists appear to agree and summarizing the more significant list of disagreements, U.S. officials said. The purpose of the U.S.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton rejoined the Israeli-Syrian peace talks Thursday, hoping to persuade the Middle East antagonists to speed up the pace of negotiations that have produced a few new ideas but no real progress toward agreement. Clinton arrived by helicopter just before 5 p.m. and immediately went into separate meetings with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Shareh. The delegations had been marking time Thursday awaiting Clinton's arrival.
NEWS
January 4, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Admonished by the Clinton administration that they face "a historic opportunity that may not come again," Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Shareh opened a conference Monday aimed at ending half a century of war and animosity. But the meeting almost immediately hit a snag when an anticipated face-to-face session between Barak and Shareh failed to occur.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Challenged by President Clinton to rise above a history of conflict, Israel and Syria on Wednesday opened their highest-level peace talks ever with expressions of hope tarnished by echoes of the antagonisms that have kept them formally at war for more than half a century.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | By JOHN DANISZEWSKI,
For decades, the goal of forging a comprehensive Middle East peace has been the diplomatic Holy Grail for U.S. leaders. Now, with his second term ebbing fast, President Clinton has what may be his last best chance to bring about peace between Israel and its chief remaining Arab adversary.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Shareh held face-to-face talks Friday for only the second time as the fifth day of the Middle East peace talks plodded toward an inconclusive end. President Clinton, who met alone with Barak and Shareh for about 40 minutes, handed them a U.S.-drafted document outlining issues on which the antagonists appear to agree and summarizing the more significant list of disagreements, U.S. officials said. The purpose of the U.S.
NEWS
September 5, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Israel and Syria so far apart that U.S. officials believe immediate peace talks would lead to sure failure, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright launched a new round of intense diplomacy Saturday involving the longtime antagonists, urging them to move beyond entrenched positions.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright turned her attention to Syria on Friday after failing to restart the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. U.S. officials said Albright had hoped to arrange a face-to-face meeting between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat but was unable to do so.
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