Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Taiwan
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Taiwan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elections for Taiwan's national parliament Dec. 1 may be 9,000 miles away, but the distance isn't deterring Taiwanese Americans in the Los Angeles area from participating in the process. Droves of well-connected and well-heeled Taiwanese Americans, many from the San Gabriel Valley, have been leaving Los Angeles for Taipei since Sunday, planning to work for legislative candidates who belong to the Democratic Progressive Party of President Chen Shui-bian.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Although it was the first time in 15 years that a Taiwanese president had arrived on U.S. soil, Lee Teng-hui stayed in his plane when it landed in Hawaii this week on the way to a visit to Nicaragua. Despite congressional protests, Lee was limited by the Clinton Administration to only a short refueling stop in order not to offend the People's Republic of China. The United States broke off diplomatic relations with Taiwan in 1979.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What exactly did President Bush say? And what did he really mean? From Beijing to Taipei, Tokyo to Hanoi and on to Canberra, policymakers and analysts are engaged in a giant guessing game to figure out exactly what happened midweek when the president said on a morning TV show that he would do "whatever" it takes to defend Taiwan, and even opened the door to deploying troops as one option. Many in Washington are wondering too. The debate spanning the Pacific centers on the scope of the U.S.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first American trade sanctions aimed at protecting endangered species, the Clinton Administration said Monday that it will impose penalties against Taiwan for its failure to halt the use of tiger and rhinoceros products. The sanctions, the first against Taiwan for any reason, will bar American imports of wildlife products from the Asian nation. Their use reflects the growing attention being paid to environmental issues in world trade.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 |
Seeking to ease tensions over Taiwan, the commander of U.S. Pacific forces warned China's military leaders Tuesday that any use of force against the island would be regarded "with grave concern" by Washington, a U.S. official said. Adm. Dennis Blair's appeal for restraint comes after China stepped up pressure on Taiwan ahead of the island's March 18 presidential election. In a declaration last week, China said Taiwan risked attack if it indefinitely rebuffed demands for unification talks.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier this month, the Clinton administration quietly settled upon a strategy for smoothing over frictions with China caused by the NATO air war against Yugoslavia and the U.S. bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade. According to senior officials, the strategy went like this: Don't hope for much until China's top leaders conclude a series of meetings next month at the Chinese seaside retreat of Beidaihe.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A surprise move by Taiwan to assert itself, which angered China and threatened to drive a deeper wedge between Washington and Beijing, may actually have the opposite effect of nudging the two big powers closer together. In the second exchange between the two men in a week, President Clinton telephoned Chinese President Jiang Zemin on Sunday, reiterating U.S. support for the idea that there is only "one China" and that together, the mainland and Taiwan make up a single country.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | Reuters
China reacted sharply Thursday to rumors that former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui plans a trip to the United States, saying that any form of visit by Beijing's nemesis would gravely hurt Sino-American relations. Reports that Lee wants to visit the United States have swirled in Taiwan's media for weeks, but an aide and U.S. officials say they are not aware of any such plan. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing said there was no indication that Lee planned to visit.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | HENRY CHU and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China lashed out Tuesday at the U.S. decision to sell the largest arms package in a decade to Taiwan and warned that it reserved the right to take retaliatory action. Only hours later, the Bush administration formally presented the arms offer, which includes four destroyers, eight submarines and a dozen aircraft, to a delegation from Taiwan. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sino-U.S. tensions over Taiwan flared anew Wednesday as President Bush declared that the United States would do "whatever it took to help Taiwan defend herself" and said the deployment of American troops is "certainly an option" if China were to invade the island. But he quickly sought to correct any impression that the remarks constitute a departure from long-standing American policy, which is deliberately vague on how the U.S. would help Taiwan.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | HENRY CHU and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China lashed out Tuesday at the U.S. decision to sell the largest arms package in a decade to Taiwan and warned that it reserved the right to take retaliatory action. Only hours later, the Bush administration formally presented the arms offer, which includes four destroyers, eight submarines and a dozen aircraft, to a delegation from Taiwan. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a middle ground between angering China and helping Taiwan, President Bush has decided to sell Taiwan older destroyers, diesel submarines, sub-hunting aircraft and a new version of Patriot air defense missiles--but not the advanced radar system sought by the Taipei government, U.S. officials said Monday. However, the president intends to reconsider Taiwan's request next year, according to a top Republican senator who was briefed by Pentagon officials.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, as the Clinton administration was trying to decide what weapon systems to sell to Taiwan, it suddenly found itself under intense pressure from one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) wanted the White House to let Taiwan buy advanced Aegis radar systems mounted on Arleigh Burke destroyers. And he wanted two of those warships to be built at Litton-Ingalls' shipyards in his hometown of Pascagoula, Miss.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese attack helicopters, missile boats and tanks pounded targets during war games Friday, days before Washington decides whether it will sell the island advanced weapons. Holding the live-fire drills so close to U.S.-Taiwan arms sales talks--scheduled to begin Tuesday in Washington--risked adding more tension to America's fragile relationship with China. Ties have already been strained by the April 1 collision between a U.S. spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet over the South China Sea.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, in his first appearance before a congressional foreign relations committee, reiterated firm U.S. support for Israel and Taiwan on Wednesday but stopped short of embracing new policies advocated by some lawmakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elections for Taiwan's national parliament Dec. 1 may be 9,000 miles away, but the distance isn't deterring Taiwanese Americans in the Los Angeles area from participating in the process. Droves of well-connected and well-heeled Taiwanese Americans, many from the San Gabriel Valley, have been leaving Los Angeles for Taipei since Sunday, planning to work for legislative candidates who belong to the Democratic Progressive Party of President Chen Shui-bian.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian has pulled out of a meeting today with members of Congress, a visit that the Clinton administration did not want to happen for fear of riling Chinese sensitivities to U.S.-Taiwan relations. Chen informed Rep. Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.) on Saturday night that he was unable to attend, the U.S. congressman said in a staff statement issued in Washington.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | Reuters
China reacted sharply Thursday to rumors that former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui plans a trip to the United States, saying that any form of visit by Beijing's nemesis would gravely hurt Sino-American relations. Reports that Lee wants to visit the United States have swirled in Taiwan's media for weeks, but an aide and U.S. officials say they are not aware of any such plan. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing said there was no indication that Lee planned to visit.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China is dispatching its top foreign policy official to Washington next month in an apparent bid to talk the Bush administration out of approving new weapons for Taiwan during its first months in office. Vice Premier Qian Qichen's visit has not been announced, but a senior administration official confirmed it this week in response to a Times query. Qian's trip will represent the first high-level contact between China and the new administration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|