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United States Foreign Relations Taiwan

NEWS
April 25, 2001 | HENRY CHU and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China lashed out Tuesday at the U.S. decision to sell the largest arms package in a decade to Taiwan and warned that it reserved the right to take retaliatory action. Only hours later, the Bush administration formally presented the arms offer, which includes four destroyers, eight submarines and a dozen aircraft, to a delegation from Taiwan. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S.
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NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a middle ground between angering China and helping Taiwan, President Bush has decided to sell Taiwan older destroyers, diesel submarines, sub-hunting aircraft and a new version of Patriot air defense missiles--but not the advanced radar system sought by the Taipei government, U.S. officials said Monday. However, the president intends to reconsider Taiwan's request next year, according to a top Republican senator who was briefed by Pentagon officials.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, as the Clinton administration was trying to decide what weapon systems to sell to Taiwan, it suddenly found itself under intense pressure from one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) wanted the White House to let Taiwan buy advanced Aegis radar systems mounted on Arleigh Burke destroyers. And he wanted two of those warships to be built at Litton-Ingalls' shipyards in his hometown of Pascagoula, Miss.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese attack helicopters, missile boats and tanks pounded targets during war games Friday, days before Washington decides whether it will sell the island advanced weapons. Holding the live-fire drills so close to U.S.-Taiwan arms sales talks--scheduled to begin Tuesday in Washington--risked adding more tension to America's fragile relationship with China. Ties have already been strained by the April 1 collision between a U.S. spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet over the South China Sea.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, in his first appearance before a congressional foreign relations committee, reiterated firm U.S. support for Israel and Taiwan on Wednesday but stopped short of embracing new policies advocated by some lawmakers.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | Reuters
China reacted sharply Thursday to rumors that former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui plans a trip to the United States, saying that any form of visit by Beijing's nemesis would gravely hurt Sino-American relations. Reports that Lee wants to visit the United States have swirled in Taiwan's media for weeks, but an aide and U.S. officials say they are not aware of any such plan. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing said there was no indication that Lee planned to visit.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China is dispatching its top foreign policy official to Washington next month in an apparent bid to talk the Bush administration out of approving new weapons for Taiwan during its first months in office. Vice Premier Qian Qichen's visit has not been announced, but a senior administration official confirmed it this week in response to a Times query. Qian's trip will represent the first high-level contact between China and the new administration.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian has pulled out of a meeting today with members of Congress, a visit that the Clinton administration did not want to happen for fear of riling Chinese sensitivities to U.S.-Taiwan relations. Chen informed Rep. Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.) on Saturday night that he was unable to attend, the U.S. congressman said in a staff statement issued in Washington.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | JACK NELSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key House Republicans and Democrats, defying Clinton administration policy, plan to meet with newly elected President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan when he visits Los Angeles on Sunday on the eve of the Democratic National Convention. Rep.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Taiwan's new president, Chen Shui-bian, may have been elected as a reformer, but he isn't bringing a fresh broom to Washington. In fact, it turns out that Chen is going to do business here the same way his predecessor, Lee Teng-hui, did: by having his friends and financial backers pay large sums of money to a Washington lobbying firm.
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