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United States Foreign Relations Taiwan

NEWS
March 8, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, in his first appearance before a congressional foreign relations committee, reiterated firm U.S. support for Israel and Taiwan on Wednesday but stopped short of embracing new policies advocated by some lawmakers.
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NEWS
February 9, 2001 | Reuters
China reacted sharply Thursday to rumors that former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui plans a trip to the United States, saying that any form of visit by Beijing's nemesis would gravely hurt Sino-American relations. Reports that Lee wants to visit the United States have swirled in Taiwan's media for weeks, but an aide and U.S. officials say they are not aware of any such plan. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing said there was no indication that Lee planned to visit.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China is dispatching its top foreign policy official to Washington next month in an apparent bid to talk the Bush administration out of approving new weapons for Taiwan during its first months in office. Vice Premier Qian Qichen's visit has not been announced, but a senior administration official confirmed it this week in response to a Times query. Qian's trip will represent the first high-level contact between China and the new administration.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian has pulled out of a meeting today with members of Congress, a visit that the Clinton administration did not want to happen for fear of riling Chinese sensitivities to U.S.-Taiwan relations. Chen informed Rep. Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.) on Saturday night that he was unable to attend, the U.S. congressman said in a staff statement issued in Washington.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | JACK NELSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key House Republicans and Democrats, defying Clinton administration policy, plan to meet with newly elected President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan when he visits Los Angeles on Sunday on the eve of the Democratic National Convention. Rep.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prominent congressional advocates of boosting Taiwan's defense denounced the Clinton administration's decision Monday to delay the sale of four destroyers equipped with sophisticated radar systems and other military hardware meant to help the island stave off threats from mainland China.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Taiwan is far more vulnerable to attack from China than is generally recognized because its isolated military has fallen behind technologically, according to a highly classified Pentagon report. The 40-page report details "a host of problems" with the Taiwanese military's ability to defend against planes, ballistic missiles and cruise missiles, said a Clinton administration official familiar with it.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of Taiwan's dramatic presidential election, Asia specialists believe that the United States faces one overriding challenge: keeping all sides cool during the uncertain postelection period, as a new, untested leader assumes power on the island. "What's needed is a little bit of time for people to calm down, breathe normally and think through in an unemotional manner where things are going and the stakes that are involved," said Robert L.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 |
Seeking to ease tensions over Taiwan, the commander of U.S. Pacific forces warned China's military leaders Tuesday that any use of force against the island would be regarded "with grave concern" by Washington, a U.S. official said. Adm. Dennis Blair's appeal for restraint comes after China stepped up pressure on Taiwan ahead of the island's March 18 presidential election. In a declaration last week, China said Taiwan risked attack if it indefinitely rebuffed demands for unification talks.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diplomatic tensions between the United States and China escalated Tuesday as the State Department summoned the Chinese ambassador for urgent discussions and the Clinton administration warned Beijing against trying to unify Taiwan with the mainland by force. "The U.S. government rejects any use of force or any threat of force in this situation," White House Press Secretary Joe Lockhart said.
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