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NEWS
July 14, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Justice Department, proceeding with its controversial investigation of campaign fund-raising irregularities, on Monday charged Thai businesswoman Pauline Kanchanalak and her sister-in-law with conspiring to funnel illegal foreign money into President Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign.
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NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Thai police said Wednesday that they have arrested a suspected drug trafficker sought by the U.S. government, which charges that he was the accountant for what used to be the world's largest heroin smuggling syndicate. Yang Wan-Hsuan, for whom the U.S. government has offered a $2-million reward, was arrested Tuesday night in Chiang Mai, 360 miles north of Bangkok, the capital, Thai narcotics police told a news conference. Police Gen.
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BUSINESS
December 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Talks With U.S. Over Air Service Planned: Six years after the Southeast Asian nation ripped up its aviation agreement with the United States, the gap between the two nations has narrowed enough to hold formal talks this week. On the table is an expansion of passenger, cargo and air charter services between the U.S. and Thailand, an increasingly popular business destination that doubles as a tourist hot spot.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Justice Department, proceeding with its controversial investigation of campaign fund-raising irregularities, on Monday charged Thai businesswoman Pauline Kanchanalak and her sister-in-law with conspiring to funnel illegal foreign money into President Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Fluor Daniel said Tuesday that it has been awarded three contracts involving separate construction and energy engineering projects for two foreign companies and the government of Thailand. The company, the principal operating subsidiary of Irvine-based Fluor Corp., said it has won contracts to study the possible expansion of a natural gas pipeline in Thailand; to supervise construction of a $94-million petrochemical plant in England for Royal Dutch Shell Co.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks between international record producers and Thailand's pirate tape industry have failed to turn up a compromise formula for ending the large-scale illegal copying of records. "We couldn't reach an agreement," said Giouw Jui Chian, Southeast Asian regional director of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, which represents American and other Western record companies.
NEWS
August 4, 1989
A senior Thai police official is under investigation in Bangkok after his indictment by a U.S. grand jury on charges he helped smuggle heroin into the United States, American and Thai officials said. A federal grand jury in Brooklyn, N.Y., indicted Maj. Gen. Vech Pechborom, an assistant police inspector, on four counts July 13. A U.S. official in Bangkok said Vech was part of a Southeast Asian ring that smuggled heroin into the United States at least 15 times.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
During a trip to Asia this spring, Vice President Dan Quayle engaged in a practice U.S. presidents and vice presidents have traditionally shunned: He lobbied foreign government leaders on behalf of specific American companies. While in Jakarta on May 1, Quayle at least twice brought up with senior Indonesian officials a pending effort by American Telephone & Telegraph to land a multimillion-dollar contract to manufacture telecommunications equipment in that country.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. military experts left Bangkok, Thailand, for the eighth joint field investigation to resolve the fates of American soldiers missing in action from the Vietnam War, a U.S. Embassy official said. For about 15 days, the two U.S. teams will join Vietnamese authorities in investigating areas in Song Be province and Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam and Ha Bac province near Hanoi, the official said.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Friday that he hopes "the worst is over" in the Asian financial crisis, but he warned that governments in the region must put more reforms into place if they want to avoid a new round of economic shocks. Clinton used a meeting with Thailand's prime minister, Chuan Leekpai, to both praise that country for overhauling its economy and, by implication, to urge Indonesia to begin carrying out economic changes that it has promised. The president made his remarks as U.S.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Talks With U.S. Over Air Service Planned: Six years after the Southeast Asian nation ripped up its aviation agreement with the United States, the gap between the two nations has narrowed enough to hold formal talks this week. On the table is an expansion of passenger, cargo and air charter services between the U.S. and Thailand, an increasingly popular business destination that doubles as a tourist hot spot.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is engaging the new Thai government in some political brinkmanship in an effort to prevent a politician alleged to have links with the narcotics trade from becoming a Cabinet minister. The disagreement between Washington and Bangkok is the first fallout from Sunday's election victory by the conservative Chart Thai (Thai Nation) party. The party, headed by Banharn Silpaarcha, has announced that it will form a coalition government involving seven parties.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush Administration on Wednesday pressed for an end to violence in Thailand, U.S. officials have found that in the post-Cold War environment, there is not much Washington can do alone to influence events in Bangkok. Japan is now by far Thailand's largest supplier of foreign aid and investment. In 1990, Tokyo supplied about $419 million in grants and loans to Thailand, about 74% of Thailand's entire worldwide foreign aid.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groups of pro-democracy demonstrators pulled back from a confrontation with security forces late Tuesday, dispersing when troops fired in the air after two nights of running gun battles turned Bangkok's narrow streets into a war zone. In the third day of Bangkok violence, nations around the world sent warnings to Thailand's military government protesting the attacks on demonstrators. The United States assailed the Thai army's use of deadly force and suspended a joint U.S.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thailand's government on Friday named as a deputy prime minister a politician accused by the United States of having connections with the illegal narcotics trade. Radio Thailand said Narong Wongwan was appointed one of five deputy prime ministers in a decree issued by the country's monarch, King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Narong heads the Samakkhi Tham party, which won the most seats in the March 22 elections for a new Parliament.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thai officials Thursday denied breaching the rights of hill people from Laos and challenged the United States to accept more refugees after Washington charged Bangkok with serious violations of refugee human rights over its handling of Hmong tribesmen. William A. Brown, U.S.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush Administration on Wednesday pressed for an end to violence in Thailand, U.S. officials have found that in the post-Cold War environment, there is not much Washington can do alone to influence events in Bangkok. Japan is now by far Thailand's largest supplier of foreign aid and investment. In 1990, Tokyo supplied about $419 million in grants and loans to Thailand, about 74% of Thailand's entire worldwide foreign aid.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks between international record producers and Thailand's pirate tape industry have failed to turn up a compromise formula for ending the large-scale illegal copying of records. "We couldn't reach an agreement," said Giouw Jui Chian, Southeast Asian regional director of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, which represents American and other Western record companies.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the drug business is nothing new to Southeast Asia, the region's economic boom has largely overshadowed it. But now Thailand's prominent role as a drug transshipment point could be adversely affecting the country's legitimate exports, according to an Anaheim-based importer. Palle S.
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