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United States Foreign Relations Tibet

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NEWS
September 15, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the 1960s, the CIA provided the Tibetan exile movement with $1.7 million a year for operations against China, including an annual subsidy of $180,000 for the Dalai Lama, according to newly released U.S. intelligence documents. The money for the Tibetans and the Dalai Lama was part of the CIA's worldwide effort during the height of the Cold War to undermine Communist governments, particularly in the Soviet Union and China. In fact, the U.S.
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NEWS
June 16, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
What would happen if America and its allies were to intervene to protect the rights of Tibetans under Chinese rule in much the same fashion as the NATO allies just did on behalf of the people of Kosovo? The answer is that the United States already tried, a long time ago. For years, during the 1950s and '60s, the CIA actively backed the Tibetan cause with arms, military training, money, air support and all sorts of other help. It didn't work out well at all.
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NEWS
September 12, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama began a three-day visit to Washington on Monday as the Clinton Administration struggled to prevent Tibet from becoming a new sore spot between the United States and China in the same fashion that Taiwan did earlier this year. Even before he arrived here, Chinese officials had admonished the Administration privately not to give the Tibetan too high a profile. "You would be correct in assuming we heard from [Chinese officials] on the subject," admitted one U.S. official.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese President Jiang Zemin protested to Vice President Al Gore on Monday that the Clinton administration has been displaying too much support for both Taiwan's Nationalist government and the Dalai Lama, the exiled leader of Tibet, according to U.S. officials. Last week, the administration dispatched Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson to Taipei for rare high-level talks with Taiwanese officials.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Beijing accused the U.S. government of covertly supporting Tibetan independence, focusing on a meeting between President Clinton and the Dalai Lama. The accusation, which came in an official New China News Agency commentary, was the second time in four days that China had criticized Clinton's Sept. 13 meeting with Tibet's exiled spiritual leader. "Covertly the U.S. government and the Congress have been backing the separatist activity of the Dalai Lama for a long time," the agency said.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, in a move that could further strain U.S. relations with China, on Thursday condemned Chinese repression in Tibet in a resolution praising the exiled Dalai Lama and voicing congressional support for his independence movement. While critics of the Bush Administration's China policy hailed the resolution's passage as a symbolic victory, a much stronger, Democrat-supported measure was blocked by Republicans at the White House's request.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, won an audience here Tuesday with President Clinton and other top administration officials, but he postponed plans to unveil an initiative aimed at working out a rapprochement with China. Instead, the Tibetan leader said he needs further talks with Beijing to make sure that any new peace offering will win a "positive response" from the Chinese leadership. U.S.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama visited the White House on Thursday and got the Salman Rushdie treatment. In a meeting carefully arranged to minimize offense to China, the peripatetic Tibetan leader was permitted 15 minutes with President Clinton. The session was labeled "unofficial" and took place not in the Oval Office but down the hall in the West Wing suite of Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American supporters of Tibet vowed Monday to maintain the pressure on China that they believe contributed to Chinese President Jiang Zemin's stated willingness to open a dialogue with the Dalai Lama. "The campaign will continue until His Holiness is entertaining visitors in the Potala Palace" in the Tibetan capital, said Mary Beth Markey, director of governmental relations for the privately funded International Campaign for Tibet in Washington.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
Chinese Ambassador Zhu Qizhen protested President Bush's meeting Tuesday night with the Dalai Lama, Administration officials said Wednesday. Zhu "explained the Chinese government's concern about meetings by foreign officials with the Dalai Lama," the exiled spiritual leader of 6 million Tibetan Buddhists, a State Department statement said. At the Tuesday night meeting with Zhu, Undersecretary of State Robert M. Kimmitt, third-ranking official in the State Department, reiterated U.S.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, won an audience here Tuesday with President Clinton and other top administration officials, but he postponed plans to unveil an initiative aimed at working out a rapprochement with China. Instead, the Tibetan leader said he needs further talks with Beijing to make sure that any new peace offering will win a "positive response" from the Chinese leadership. U.S.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the 1960s, the CIA provided the Tibetan exile movement with $1.7 million a year for operations against China, including an annual subsidy of $180,000 for the Dalai Lama, according to newly released U.S. intelligence documents. The money for the Tibetans and the Dalai Lama was part of the CIA's worldwide effort during the height of the Cold War to undermine Communist governments, particularly in the Soviet Union and China. In fact, the U.S.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American supporters of Tibet vowed Monday to maintain the pressure on China that they believe contributed to Chinese President Jiang Zemin's stated willingness to open a dialogue with the Dalai Lama. "The campaign will continue until His Holiness is entertaining visitors in the Potala Palace" in the Tibetan capital, said Mary Beth Markey, director of governmental relations for the privately funded International Campaign for Tibet in Washington.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Beijing accused the U.S. government of covertly supporting Tibetan independence, focusing on a meeting between President Clinton and the Dalai Lama. The accusation, which came in an official New China News Agency commentary, was the second time in four days that China had criticized Clinton's Sept. 13 meeting with Tibet's exiled spiritual leader. "Covertly the U.S. government and the Congress have been backing the separatist activity of the Dalai Lama for a long time," the agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1995 | From Religion News Service
In a city puffed up with self-importance, the Dalai Lama stands out as much for his ability to laugh at himself as for his flowing saffron and maroon robes--the standard garb of the "simple Buddhist monk" he insists he is. But make no mistake about it, the Dalai Lama is a skilled diplomat who, while in Washington this week, managed to gain expressions of support from both President Clinton and North Carolina Republican Sen. Jesse Helms, two men who rarely agree on anything.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama began a three-day visit to Washington on Monday as the Clinton Administration struggled to prevent Tibet from becoming a new sore spot between the United States and China in the same fashion that Taiwan did earlier this year. Even before he arrived here, Chinese officials had admonished the Administration privately not to give the Tibetan too high a profile. "You would be correct in assuming we heard from [Chinese officials] on the subject," admitted one U.S. official.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese President Jiang Zemin protested to Vice President Al Gore on Monday that the Clinton administration has been displaying too much support for both Taiwan's Nationalist government and the Dalai Lama, the exiled leader of Tibet, according to U.S. officials. Last week, the administration dispatched Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson to Taipei for rare high-level talks with Taiwanese officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1995 | From Religion News Service
In a city puffed up with self-importance, the Dalai Lama stands out as much for his ability to laugh at himself as for his flowing saffron and maroon robes--the standard garb of the "simple Buddhist monk" he insists he is. But make no mistake about it, the Dalai Lama is a skilled diplomat who, while in Washington this week, managed to gain expressions of support from both President Clinton and North Carolina Republican Sen. Jesse Helms, two men who rarely agree on anything.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dalai Lama visited the White House on Thursday and got the Salman Rushdie treatment. In a meeting carefully arranged to minimize offense to China, the peripatetic Tibetan leader was permitted 15 minutes with President Clinton. The session was labeled "unofficial" and took place not in the Oval Office but down the hall in the West Wing suite of Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, in a move that could further strain U.S. relations with China, on Thursday condemned Chinese repression in Tibet in a resolution praising the exiled Dalai Lama and voicing congressional support for his independence movement. While critics of the Bush Administration's China policy hailed the resolution's passage as a symbolic victory, a much stronger, Democrat-supported measure was blocked by Republicans at the White House's request.
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