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BUSINESS
May 18, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady hum of detergent bottles being swept along an assembly line represents the sweet sound of earnings for S.C. Johnson Wax. After years of turmoil and uncertainty, the Wisconsin-based company has finally turned an early investment in Ukraine into a profitable business. Its Brillo detergent, for example, is now a household name here. "We've been very successful," says Boris Kuznetsov, manager of the Kiev plant of the 100% U.S-owned subsidiary.
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NEWS
June 6, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fourteen years after the world's worst nuclear accident sent plumes of radioactivity and shivers of fear across Europe, Ukraine announced Monday that it will close the entire Chernobyl nuclear plant in December. President Leonid D. Kuchma disclosed the plans to shut the facility, responsible for the deaths of at least 31 people and the poisoning of vast acres of farmland, with President Clinton at his side.
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One offended critic called it the "Chicken Kiev" speech, and it left a bitterness some Ukrainians could still taste as Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Wednesday spelled out American intentions toward their new country. As recently as one month ago, radical Ukrainian lawmaker Ivan Zayets recalled, "We were saying, 'We will be autonomous.' But America was still telling us, 'No, you won't, you'll be in the Soviet Union.'
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
The government on Wednesday ordered that a plan be prepared for closing the Chernobyl nuclear plant by the end of the year, as the West has long demanded, but said final approval still must come from the president. The government decision followed earlier pledges by President Leonid D. Kuchma to shut down the plant, site of the world's worst nuclear accident. Kuchma promised U.S. Energy Secretary Bill Richardson last month that the plant would be shut down this year.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hottest restaurant here these days is a retro-chic diner that sports "Miami Vice" pink walls, halogen lighting and oversized Marilyn Monroe portraits with the idol's lips outlined in fuchsia neon. The waitresses wear pastel suspenders and the itsy-bitsy black spandex skirts that seem to define the female dress code in every go-go economy of the former East Bloc. "It looks just like the West," said a young American admiring the posh crowd at the hard-currency-only Studio eatery.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, encouraged by Ukraine's agreement to dismantle nuclear weapons and its cautious turn toward economic reform, has decided to more than double U.S. aid to the strategically important country, officials said Thursday. Clinton plans to announce the boost, from $330 million to about $700 million, after he has lunch at the White House with visiting Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk today.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last December, as the Soviet Union was disintegrating, Secretary of State James A. Baker III rushed to the capitals of Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus to win promises that they would quietly give up their nuclear weapons--thus heading off an arms race with their giant neighbor, Russia. The promises haven't held. In the months since, Ukraine and Kazakhstan have added troublesome conditions to their pledges to destroy their nuclear arsenals or turn them over to Russia.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Ukrainian defense chief embraced a U.S. proposal Monday to put the nuclear warheads in his country under international control. U.S. Defense Secretary Les Aspin said he hopes to "nail down" details of the plan soon. Still unresolved are Russia's objections to the warheads remaining in Ukraine. Russia's defense chief told Aspin on Sunday that Moscow insists that the warheads be taken to Russia for dismantling.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a concession to the United States and Russia, Ukraine disclosed Monday that it is deactivating some of the most sophisticated weapons in the 1,800-warhead nuclear arsenal left on Ukrainian territory after the breakup of the Soviet Union. The move to dismantle 20 of its 46 Soviet-made SS-24 missiles, announced in Kiev by Deputy Prime Minister Valery Shmarov and confirmed by top Clinton Administration officials, came in response to increased pressure from Washington and Moscow last weekend. U.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the presidents of America and Russia raised champagne toasts this week in Moscow to the boldest U.S.-Russian nuclear arms reduction pact ever, they omitted some important people from the guest list: the Ukrainians. The fate of the START II treaty signed Sunday and the reduction of superpower arsenals as a whole now lie in the hands of elected officials in this hilly capital on the Dnieper River. In large part, Ukrainians say, the problem is financial.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fresh from a helicopter tour of the site of the world's worst nuclear accident and a stroll through the ghost town abandoned in its wake, Vice President Al Gore on Thursday used the images of Chernobyl's devastation to urge India and Pakistan to renounce a new round of nuclear competition. "Today, for the first time, I saw Chernobyl," Gore said after making the highest-level visit here of any U.S. official.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After months of diplomatic pressure from the United States, Ukraine on Friday announced that it will cancel plans to supply turbines for a nuclear reactor under construction in Iran. "We decided to refrain from participation in the . . . project," Ukrainian Foreign Minister Hennady Udovenko said. "It wasn't an easy decision." The announcement, which came during a one-day visit by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to the Ukrainian capital, constituted a victory in the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady hum of detergent bottles being swept along an assembly line represents the sweet sound of earnings for S.C. Johnson Wax. After years of turmoil and uncertainty, the Wisconsin-based company has finally turned an early investment in Ukraine into a profitable business. Its Brillo detergent, for example, is now a household name here. "We've been very successful," says Boris Kuznetsov, manager of the Kiev plant of the 100% U.S-owned subsidiary.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma on Wednesday pledged his country's cooperation in investigating reports that a state-owned Ukrainian company is selling or leasing aircraft to drug dealers in Colombia and Panama. But Kuchma, who discussed the reports with President Clinton during an Oval Office meeting, told reporters that he believed that his government has no responsibility if Latin American purchasers are putting the Soviet-designed Antonov-32B aircraft to such uses.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Tuesday that it will question Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma during a scheduled visit to the White House about reports that the Kiev government has sold and leased aircraft to South American drug traffickers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | ED BOND
Not until after the donation of a Torah was arranged did the Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills learn just how close its connection to the Ukrainian village of Vinogradov was. "There were some members of our congregation who were from Vinogradov," said Rabbi Eli Schochet, whose temple donated a Torah to the Ukrainian village after a filmmaker launched a nationwide search for one.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration offered Ukraine a package of economic aid and security assurances Monday in the hope of shaping the former Soviet republic's future as a Western-aligned state without nuclear arms. U.S.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday sought to minimize the danger of a rupture in relations with Moscow over his Administration's planned recognition of an independent Ukraine. "We're all right," Bush insisted during a short shopping trip from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md. "There's not going to be a big breach here." The attempt by Bush to play down the potential for a U.S.-Soviet rift came a day after Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hottest restaurant here these days is a retro-chic diner that sports "Miami Vice" pink walls, halogen lighting and oversized Marilyn Monroe portraits with the idol's lips outlined in fuchsia neon. The waitresses wear pastel suspenders and the itsy-bitsy black spandex skirts that seem to define the female dress code in every go-go economy of the former East Bloc. "It looks just like the West," said a young American admiring the posh crowd at the hard-currency-only Studio eatery.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising President Leonid D. Kuchma as a post-Soviet Franklin D. Roosevelt, President Clinton on Tuesday promised to add $200 million to the U.S. aid program for Ukraine to help pay for the dismantling of the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal and to prop up the nation's sagging economy. If approved by the incoming Republican-dominated Congress, the additional money will increase total U.S.
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