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September 24, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most knew him as a Democratic Party activist who was deeply involved in California politics during the Jimmy Carter years. He rubbed shoulders with the party elite, including Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. and U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston. During the 1976 presidential campaign, he described taking part in a three-hour strategy session with Cranston, Brown and presidential hopeful Carter at the Pacific Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport.
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October 6, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's International Outlook column appears in this space every Wednesday
There's no better example of the Republican Congress' seeming inability to play a serious, effective role in overseeing American foreign policy than the way it has handled the matter of North Korea. For nearly five years now, Republican congressional leaders have fussed, fumed and fulminated over the Clinton administration's policy of offering incentives to North Korea in exchange for carefully hedged promises not to proceed with nuclear weapons and missile programs.
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NEWS
October 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Energy Secretary Jesus Reyes Heroles has been named Mexico's new ambassador to the United States. He is expected to be confirmed this month by the Senate, which is dominated by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. He will replace Jesus Silva Herzog, the envoy since 1995. Reyes Heroles, 45, is known as a dedicated civil servant and an active PRI member. Before heading the Energy Ministry in 1996, he was a foreign policy advisor to then-President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most knew him as a Democratic Party activist who was deeply involved in California politics during the Jimmy Carter years. He rubbed shoulders with the party elite, including Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. and U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston. During the 1976 presidential campaign, he described taking part in a three-hour strategy session with Cranston, Brown and presidential hopeful Carter at the Pacific Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's International Outlook column appears in this space every Wednesday
There's no better example of the Republican Congress' seeming inability to play a serious, effective role in overseeing American foreign policy than the way it has handled the matter of North Korea. For nearly five years now, Republican congressional leaders have fussed, fumed and fulminated over the Clinton administration's policy of offering incentives to North Korea in exchange for carefully hedged promises not to proceed with nuclear weapons and missile programs.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First came American gunships, thundering through the night, pounding their way toward the strongman's lair. On loudspeakers, crews shouted to residents around army headquarters: Evacuate! From wooden homes in the slums surrounding Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's Panama Defense Forces compound in Panama City, men, women and children scurried out into the streets, fear in their eyes, the first refugees of the fight.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Energy Secretary Jesus Reyes Heroles has been named Mexico's new ambassador to the United States. He is expected to be confirmed this month by the Senate, which is dominated by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. He will replace Jesus Silva Herzog, the envoy since 1995. Reyes Heroles, 45, is known as a dedicated civil servant and an active PRI member. Before heading the Energy Ministry in 1996, he was a foreign policy advisor to then-President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First came American gunships, thundering through the night, pounding their way toward the strongman's lair. On loudspeakers, crews shouted to residents around army headquarters: Evacuate! From wooden homes in the slums surrounding Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's Panama Defense Forces compound in Panama City, men, women and children scurried out into the streets, fear in their eyes, the first refugees of the fight.
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