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September 3, 1990 | DANICA KIRKA
In 1980, members of the U.S. Water Polo team were on their way to Hungary to play in the Tunsgrum Cup--a prestigious tournament that was to serve as a pre-Olympic warm up--when they heard that they really didn't have to bother. President Jimmy Carter, bolstered by Congress, had made up his mind. After weeks of posturing, Carter decided that the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan made U.S. participation in the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow untenable.
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NEWS
April 27, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than 24 hours after President Clinton personally launched a campaign to forge new arms control agreements with Russia, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) vowed Wednesday to block the effort.
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NEWS
July 13, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virtually unnoticed among the many superpower negotiations, the United States and Soviet Union are trying to settle U.S. claims of more than $1 billion on debts that predate the Bolshevik Revolution, including old czarist bonds bought by Americans. Recent U.S.-Soviet commercial talks have focused on Soviet efforts to obtain most-favored-nation trading status, which would enable the Soviets to get the U.S. government credits and loans they need to resuscitate their economy.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaves skittered across the quiet streets of East Berlin's Karlshorst district on the autumn day that would be East Germany's last, and anticipation filled the air. It was Oct. 2, 1990, a day before Germany was to become united for the first time since the end of World War II, and Karlshorst, like all of Germany, was preparing for the party of the century. Deep inside one nondescript Karlshorst house, however, the Cold War was still very much underway.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A handclasp and a walk in the woods in Geneva. Frigid stares and tight lips in the blustery cold of Reykjavik. The signing in Washington of a historic treaty on medium-range nuclear weapons. And now in Moscow, a walk through the heart of the "evil empire." The moods and images of the four summits of Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev have differed in ways both subtle and striking.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, proclaiming the end of an era of "hard, joyless peace between two armed camps," called on Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday to join him in an effort to "once and for all end the Cold War" when the two meet off Malta next week.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS and DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writers
China and the Soviet Union, which quarreled bitterly for 30 years over who was the greater threat to world peace and who were the better Communists, ended their feud today with a determination to forge a new relationship bringing them together again. Deng Xiaoping, China's senior leader, said that relations between the two countries now were fully normalized as he began talks here this morning with visiting Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev at the first summit meeting between the two countries since 1959.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a move that Western analysts here said has more political than practical importance, the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact nations published Monday for the first time detailed data on their military forces in Europe and their estimates of NATO forces. East Bloc defense ministers said in an accompanying statement that the data shows "rough parity" between the two sides.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Bay Area artists who will present their works to Mikhail S. Gorbachev at Stanford University on Monday have wanted to meet the Soviet president for years, but neither dreamed they would get the opportunity only a few miles from home. "I wanted personally to shake Gorbachev's hand. . . . I figured I would have to go to Moscow in order to do it," said Sausalito painter George Sumner, whose oil work "The Peacemakers" will be given to the Soviet leader.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
At a recent black-tie dinner, President Reagan entertained guests by reading captions a la Johnny Carson as news photographs flashed on a giant screen behind him. As a picture appeared of the President standing by as Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a book, Reagan deadpanned: "I even made him write a hundred times, 'I will not cheat, I will not cheat.' "I like Mikhail, but you have to watch him," the President quipped.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It was late on a wintry Friday afternoon when Undersecretary of State Dean Acheson got the bad news from the British. Two official documents informed him that His Majesty's Government, its economy crippled, could no longer continue aid to Greece and Turkey, leaving both countries vulnerable to communist conquest. "They were shockers," Acheson wrote later of the British messages. He quickly passed the word to the White House, and within three weeks President Harry S.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago this week, the Reykjavik summit on nuclear disarmament between President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev looked like a miserable failure: After hammering out tentative agreements on missile cutbacks, Gorbachev suddenly demanded that the United States stop work on the anti-missile Strategic Defense Initiative. Reagan refused. And both sides went home from Iceland grumbling.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the greatest success stories of U.S. Cold War espionage was written when CIA officers climbed down into the underbelly of the Soviet Union. In a largely untold tale of American bravery, Central Intelligence Agency officers worked in tunnels below Moscow, ducking into manholes and scrambling through the muck and mire of the city's sewers to install and maintain eavesdropping equipment in tunnels carrying Soviet government and military telecommunications.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making a virtue of necessity, the United States and its European allies have eased the terms of a vital arms control agreement to allow Russia to be in compliance, preventing the treaty from falling into tatters. The Kremlin has complained for more than two years that the Conventional Forces in Europe accord imposes intolerable limits on the numbers of tanks and artillery pieces Russia can deploy in its border regions. With a Nov.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin on Thursday denied allegations that the Pentagon once rigged missile tests for the "Star Wars" program, but he pledged to give Congress a full appraisal of future weapons tests. "I guarantee that while I am here, Defense Department tests will be conducted honestly and reported honestly," Aspin said.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
THE COLD WAR'S OVER, WE'RE GOING TO . . . : President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin want to remove all Cold War restrictions, but their two countries are still haggling over the rules that govern travel by diplomats and journalists. . . . The old rules blocked Americans from visiting large parts of the former Soviet Union and prohibited Russian diplomats from using many airports, including LAX.
SPORTS
September 3, 1990 | DANICA KIRKA
Talking to Joseph Vargas about the 1980 Olympic boycott is a bit like uncorking a champagne bottle after shaking vigorously. The emotions explode and shoot out. "My opinion today was my opinion in 1980. There's no room for political leverage in the Olympic Games. That's not the point of the Olympics. Nothing was accomplished. Let's just put it this way. I don't think the U.S. boycott of the 1980 Olympic Games led to the fall of the Berlin Wall."
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking further savings from the declining Soviet threat, Democratic House and Senate leaders said Sunday that U.S. troop levels in Central Europe should be cut to about 100,000 within a few years, or roughly half the level proposed last week by President Bush. But the suggestion by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) drew immediate fire from President Bush's chief of staff, John H.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A weekly newspaper, citing what it says are secret documents from Communist Party archives, said the late American industrialist Armand Hammer was a courier for the Communists in the 1920s. The latest edition of the Russian-English newspaper We/Myi said two documents disclose that after Hammer signed an agreement for processing asbestos deposits in the Ural Mountains city of Alapayevsk, he carried home $34,000 to help organize the Communist Party of the United States.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union shot down nine U.S. planes in the early 1950s and held 12 American survivors in prisons or psychiatric clinics, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said in a letter hand-delivered to U.S. senators Friday. The fate of the Americans is still under investigation, Yeltsin said.
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