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United States Foreign Relations Uzbekistan

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NEWS
December 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uzbek President Islam Karimov, one of America's strategic Central Asian partners in the war against terrorism, plans to extend his term to 2007 by referendum. Karimov, who was Uzbekistan's Communist-era leader and retained power after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, has been criticized frequently by international watchdog groups for his government's poor record on democracy and human rights. Despite these concerns, the U.S.
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NEWS
December 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uzbek President Islam Karimov, one of America's strategic Central Asian partners in the war against terrorism, plans to extend his term to 2007 by referendum. Karimov, who was Uzbekistan's Communist-era leader and retained power after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, has been criticized frequently by international watchdog groups for his government's poor record on democracy and human rights. Despite these concerns, the U.S.
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NEWS
November 5, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Trying to stave off a growing humanitarian crisis, the U.S. is pressing Uzbekistan to reopen a long-closed bridge that the Pentagon hopes to use to move food and medical supplies to starving Afghans, senior defense officials said Sunday. In meetings in the Uzbek capital, Tashkent, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told officials of the former Soviet republic Sunday that opening the Friendship Bridge would allow tons of humanitarian aid to reach desperately poor refugees.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Trying to stave off a growing humanitarian crisis, the U.S. is pressing Uzbekistan to reopen a long-closed bridge that the Pentagon hopes to use to move food and medical supplies to starving Afghans, senior defense officials said Sunday. In meetings in the Uzbek capital, Tashkent, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told officials of the former Soviet republic Sunday that opening the Friendship Bridge would allow tons of humanitarian aid to reach desperately poor refugees.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | From Reuters
The United States will immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with the Central Asian states of Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, the White House said Wednesday. It said President Bush decided on the move after meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who is just back from a visit to the four former Soviet republics. "The United States will open embassies in these countries by March 15. In addition, the U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With President Islam Karimov leading the way, Secretary of State James A. Baker III whipped through the capital of Tamerlane's 14th-Century empire Sunday after an opposition leader bluntly told him that modern Uzbekistan remains a totalitarian regime despite the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Islam Karimov said on state television that his government will open its airspace to U.S. and allied aircraft. Uzbekistan is on Afghanistan's northern border. Karimov said his government will "make its own contribution to the liquidation of camps and bases of terrorists in Afghanistan and is ready to make its airspace available for this purpose."
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Islam Karimov said on state television that his government will open its airspace to U.S. and allied aircraft. Uzbekistan is on Afghanistan's northern border. Karimov said his government will "make its own contribution to the liquidation of camps and bases of terrorists in Afghanistan and is ready to make its airspace available for this purpose."
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | From Reuters
The United States will immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with the Central Asian states of Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, the White House said Wednesday. It said President Bush decided on the move after meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who is just back from a visit to the four former Soviet republics. "The United States will open embassies in these countries by March 15. In addition, the U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With President Islam Karimov leading the way, Secretary of State James A. Baker III whipped through the capital of Tamerlane's 14th-Century empire Sunday after an opposition leader bluntly told him that modern Uzbekistan remains a totalitarian regime despite the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
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