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September 6, 1987 | DON A. SCHANCHE and RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Staff Writers
Pope John Paul II will bring a message of praise for what he calls the "providential" U.S. Constitution when he arrives Thursday for his second major papal journey in the United States. But he will also bring a challenge to the world's richest people to behave more responsibly, according to Vatican sources.
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NEWS
July 1, 1993 | Associated Press
The Senate on Wednesday unanimously confirmed Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn as ambassador to the Vatican.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER and THOMAS B. ROSENSTEIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than a week, the American military has been hurling a fury of scathing images and epithets at Manuel A. Noriega in a campaign clearly designed to demean and demonize the fallen Panama leader.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | Reuters
Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn said Tuesday that he has agreed to accept President Clinton's nomination of him as U.S. ambassador to the Vatican. Flynn said he was assured by the President and Administration officials that the job would have an expanded role allowing him to travel to depressed parts of the world and work to alleviate human suffering.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | Associated Press
The Vatican newspaper warned President-elect Bill Clinton on Saturday not to let the United States slip into immorality, referring to his support for abortion rights. The front-page remarks by L'Osservatore Romano were the closest the Holy See has come to an official comment on Clinton's victory. It offered best wishes to him but said those wishes were "deeply rooted in moral concern."
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | Reuters
Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn said Tuesday that he has agreed to accept President Clinton's nomination of him as U.S. ambassador to the Vatican. Flynn said he was assured by the President and Administration officials that the job would have an expanded role allowing him to travel to depressed parts of the world and work to alleviate human suffering.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration indicated Tuesday that the complex negotiations over the fate of deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega might be heading toward a resolution that would place Noriega in U.S. hands. "It's coming down to the end game," a State Department official said. "It's looking more and more and more like Noriega's choices are being narrowed down to one."
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soft-pedaling its diplomatic differences with the United States, the Vatican said Saturday that it does not intend to help deposed dictator Manuel A. Noriega evade justice by granting him refuge in its embassy in Panama City. A communique from the Vatican's Secretariat of State one day after the Vatican criticized harassment by U.S. troops surrounding the embassy was a clear peace-seeking gesture, in the judgment of Vatican observers.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House, in an effort to defuse the public face-off between Washington and the Vatican over the fate of deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega, Friday praised the Roman Catholic Church for "doing a fine job" in trying to resolve the issue and declared that negotiations continue "in a positive vein." The ousted dictator sought sanctuary in the papal mission in Panama City on Christmas Eve and has been inside it since. U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is seeking to increase pressure on the Vatican to turn deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega over to the United States and plans to present new evidence of his alleged crimes to papal authorities in Rome, officials said Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | Associated Press
The Vatican newspaper warned President-elect Bill Clinton on Saturday not to let the United States slip into immorality, referring to his support for abortion rights. The front-page remarks by L'Osservatore Romano were the closest the Holy See has come to an official comment on Clinton's victory. It offered best wishes to him but said those wishes were "deeply rooted in moral concern."
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archbishop Agostino Cacciavillan, a veteran Vatican diplomat, has been named papal envoy to the United States, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II appointed the 63-year-old Italian to succeed Archbishop Pio Laghi, 68, recently transferred to Rome to head the Congregation for Catholic Education. Cacciavillan has been serving as envoy to India and Nepal. One of the tasks of a nuncio is to advise the Pope on the appointment of bishops.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | Reuters
Pope John Paul II on Saturday appeared to call on Washington to withdraw its forces from Panama as soon as possible, diplomats said. "There, too, it is the civilian population which has suffered the most," the Pope said in his yearly address to the diplomatic corps. "One hopes that without delay the Panamanian people may return to a normal life with the dignity and freedom to which any sovereign people have a right." The United States has said 202 civilians were killed in a U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For 11 days, dozens of officials and diplomats from the United States, the Vatican and Panama conferred around the clock while their advisers pored over constitutions, canon law, extradition treaties and legal precedents--all in an effort to end the agonizing standoff with deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega. But the crisis in Panama City ultimately became a contest of wills between two men--a self-proclaimed "maximum leader" and a gentle but stubborn Spanish-born priest.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | Associated Press
The following is a text of President Bush's statement Wednesday night announcing that deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A . Noriega has surrendered to U.S. authorities: On Wednesday, Dec. 20, I ordered U.S. troops to Panama with four objectives: safeguard the lives of American citizens, help restore democracy, protect the integrity of the Panama Canal Treaties and bring Gen. Manuel Noriega to justice. All of these objectives have now been achieved.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 days after being overthrown in a U.S. military invasion and taking refuge in the Vatican embassy, Manuel A. Noriega lived a secluded, Spartan life, sealed off from the outside world by the reluctant host of his diplomatic sanctuary. Three times a day, the deposed dictator of Panama opened the door to his sweltering second-floor room in the Vatican nunciature, accepted a meal on a tray and shut himself in again, according to visitors to the embassy compound.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | Associated Press
The Libyan government said Thursday that it will hand over today the body of a U.S. Air Force officer killed in the 1986 raid on Tripoli, the North African country's official news agency reported. The body, believed to be that of the weapons system officer, Capt. Paul Lorence, 31, of San Francisco, is to be given to a Vatican representative. Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro confirmed Thursday night that the Holy See has agreed to act as an intermediary in the case "for humanitarian reasons."
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The new government of Panama prepared murder charges Sunday against Manuel A. Noriega and took part in intense negotiations with the Vatican and the Bush Administration over the fate of the deposed dictator, who is holed up in the Vatican's embassy here. The impending charges, stemming from the deaths of 10 officers involved in an Oct. 3 military revolt against Noriega, were announced by Atty. Gen. Rogelio Cruz.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration indicated Tuesday that the complex negotiations over the fate of deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega might be heading toward a resolution that would place Noriega in U.S. hands. "It's coming down to the end game," a State Department official said. "It's looking more and more and more like Noriega's choices are being narrowed down to one."
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon has begun withdrawing the U.S. invasion force from Panama, sending 141 soldiers on their way home to Ft. Ord, Calif., the White House announced Monday. The withdrawal, the first since President Bush launched an invasion of Panama in the early morning darkness of Dec. 20, was announced aboard Air Force One as the President flew from Montgomery, Ala., to Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington at the end of a New Year's holiday.
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