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NEWS
March 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Andres Perez on Friday characterized the bloody price riots that took more than 300 lives in this once tranquil and wealthy nation as a largely spontaneous and nonpolitical outburst of the poor against the rich. He blamed Venezuela's foreign-debt crisis for creating the conditions that sparked the violence.
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NEWS
April 16, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration scrambled Monday to explain why it failed to denounce the coup that briefly swept Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez from office last week, an attempt that Latin American leaders decried as an attack on a democratically elected leader. While others in the region were urging Chavez's restoration to power, the White House initially blamed the coup attempt on the president's own actions.
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NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Reuters
President Bush and Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez, meeting the day after a freely-elected government took power in Nicaragua, hailed the spread of democracy and vowed Thursday to seek freedom for all of the Americas. "Today, another nation has joined freedom's ranks. For the people of all the Americas this is a time for celebration," Bush said at a welcoming ceremony for Perez.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unlikely alliance--including the Bush Administration, Congress, environmentalists and the governments of Mexico and Venezuela--has forged a tentative agreement to stop the killing of thousands of dolphins caught annually in tuna-fishing nets. The pact, the result of months of negotiations, is included in legislation to be introduced in Congress today. The bill has bipartisan congressional support, and Mexico and Venezuela have already agreed to abide by such a pact.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | From Reuters
Texaco's $3-billion agreement to settle its dispute with Pennzoil Co. and emerge from bankruptcy may have to be renegotiated to overcome opposition by Texaco's major stockholder Carl C. Icahn, lawyers in the case said Monday. The strength of the accord, which is contained in Texaco's bankruptcy reorganization plan, was questioned when Icahn said last week that he would oppose it with his 12.3% Texaco stake.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
At 36, Tony Armas still makes the headlines, but they are mostly in El National and El Universal, the Venezuelan newspapers that still honor their own, no matter how unnoteworthy the performance. "Armas: 1 for 5," a small headline will say. It is not important how well he does, only that he is Venezuelan, even after 12 years in the major leagues. Armas' days as an everyday player are behind him, as are the best days of his career, and so are most of the headlines.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
For two hours last week, Fidel Castro, Daniel Ortega and Vice President Dan Quayle sat in the same auditorium amid one of the largest gatherings of Latin American leaders in the past generation. Quayle, six chairs away from Castro, avoided both comandantes. It was too much to expect a meeting or even a handshake.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Andres Perez, a center-left advocate of Third World causes, returned to the presidency of Venezuela on Thursday with an appeal to the Bush Administration to treat Latin Americans as partners in a search for solutions to guerrilla conflicts and unpayable foreign debts.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle, arriving Wednesday on his first visit to Latin America, discussed anti-drug efforts with Colombia's president and declared U.S. opposition to any Latin "debtor cartel." The vice president arrived a day before inaugural ceremonies for Venezuela's new president, Carlos Andres Perez. His met first with President Virgilio Barco Vargas of Colombia.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Reagan Administration officials are outraged at the refusal of five Latin American countries to go along with a U.S. effort in the United Nations to protest alleged human right abuses in Cuba, officials said Saturday. The U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva voted 19 to 18 on Wednesday, with six abstentions, for a motion by the Indian delegation to take no action on the U.S. proposal.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | From Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle arrived Monday in Venezuela on the first leg of a Latin American tour aimed at promoting better trade relations between the region and the United States. With Quayle were Trade Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher and a group of U.S. business leaders. Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez took them to his beach house, La Guzmania in nearby Macuto, where they discussed trade and investment possibilities, Venezuelan officials said.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush suggested strongly Saturday that his decision to close the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait could be a prelude to war rather than a step toward peace, saying, "When you don't have Americans there, and if force is required, that's just one less worry I've got." The departure of the eight American diplomats still at the embassy in Kuwait city, to take place when all other American hostages are out of Kuwait, "facilitates the tough decisions that might lie ahead," Bush said.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Reuters
President Bush and Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez, meeting the day after a freely-elected government took power in Nicaragua, hailed the spread of democracy and vowed Thursday to seek freedom for all of the Americas. "Today, another nation has joined freedom's ranks. For the people of all the Americas this is a time for celebration," Bush said at a welcoming ceremony for Perez.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, seeking to demobilize simultaneously the Sandinista and Contra forces in Nicaragua, is considering a plan to insert U.N. peacekeeping troops between the hostile military units, a senior Administration official said Friday. The proposal was portrayed as a possible solution to the lack of progress in the effort to get the Sandinistas, upset in the Feb.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
At 36, Tony Armas still makes the headlines, but they are mostly in El National and El Universal, the Venezuelan newspapers that still honor their own, no matter how unnoteworthy the performance. "Armas: 1 for 5," a small headline will say. It is not important how well he does, only that he is Venezuelan, even after 12 years in the major leagues. Armas' days as an everyday player are behind him, as are the best days of his career, and so are most of the headlines.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ART PINE, Times Staff Writers
President Bush and Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez agreed Saturday to begin intensive work on a plan to reduce Venezuela's $33-billion foreign debt, making the country one of the first "test cases" of America's new Third World debt strategy. U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Andres Perez, Venezuela's president-elect, can be a man of moderation and tact, or he can be a brash challenger of the status quo. He professes friendship with the United States, but he has boldly defied U.S. policies in the past. As a former president experienced in international affairs, Perez makes no secret of his plans to seek a leadership role in Latin America.
NEWS
April 16, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration scrambled Monday to explain why it failed to denounce the coup that briefly swept Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez from office last week, an attempt that Latin American leaders decried as an attack on a democratically elected leader. While others in the region were urging Chavez's restoration to power, the White House initially blamed the coup attempt on the president's own actions.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Andres Perez on Friday characterized the bloody price riots that took more than 300 lives in this once tranquil and wealthy nation as a largely spontaneous and nonpolitical outburst of the poor against the rich. He blamed Venezuela's foreign-debt crisis for creating the conditions that sparked the violence.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
For two hours last week, Fidel Castro, Daniel Ortega and Vice President Dan Quayle sat in the same auditorium amid one of the largest gatherings of Latin American leaders in the past generation. Quayle, six chairs away from Castro, avoided both comandantes. It was too much to expect a meeting or even a handshake.
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