Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Vietnam
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Vietnam

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, many people considered Jack Bailey the best of men. He was praised as a humanitarian who had aided thousands of Southeast Asian refugees, hailed as a hero who had given desperate people a chance to live. One missionary called him "the most genuinely compassionate man I ever met." Then that Jack Bailey seemed to all but vanish, sinking into the murky realm where Americans haunted by Vietnam try to raise the dead--the presumed dead, that is.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the United States presses its war against terrorism, Vietnam is demanding that American officials extend the crackdown to an immigrant group they say has sponsored Southeast Asian bombing attempts from its headquarters in a nondescript Garden Grove office building.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A physician with ties to pro-Hanoi government organizations accused the FBI this week of failing to adequately protect Vietnamese refugees whose political views often expose them to threats and violence. Dr. Jack R. Kent, a Los Angeles endocrinologist and longtime activist in the Orange County Vietnamese community, said that as a consequence, many formerly outspoken Vietnamese have been threatened by or have fallen prey to right-wing "hit squads."
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Vietnam's most famous general and its prime minister said they were pleased with a three-day historic visit by President Clinton that ended Sunday. Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, the architect of the victory over France in 1954 and over U.S.-backed forces in 1975, said Clinton's visit "strengthens relations between the two countries." Prime Minister Phan Van Khai, speaking in Hanoi, echoed Giap's sentiments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The editor of one of the largest Vietnamese-language newspapers in the United States has received a death threat from a right-wing extremist group. The typewritten communique accuses editor Yen Ngoc Do and several other prominent Vietnamese-Americans of unspecified pro-Communist activities. It threatens to execute them on April 30, the 15th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, unless they stop their activities.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her father had been missing in Indochina for nearly 25 years, and suddenly there was a controversial photograph of him, along with two other American MIA soldiers, somewhere in the jungle. Shelby Robertson Quast was desperate for information, and when she spotted Defense Secretary Dick Cheney at a POW-MIA meeting here last month, she made a beeline for his table.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | LYNN SMITH and THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The church is red brick, pastel-paned Middle America. The music is a drum-and-guitar version of the "Battle Hymn of the Republic." The religion is hand-clapping, tears-of-joy Pentecostal. It is a typical evangelical revival meeting--except here all the Bibles, the sermons and the faces are Vietnamese.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | DE TRAN and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's announcement loosening restrictions on lending to Vietnam was being widely viewed by the Vietnamese-American community Friday as a logical, albeit risky, step toward normalization of relations. Some Orange County companies have already made plans to start trading as soon as the embargo is lifted.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of President Bush's key Orange County-based Vietnamese-American supporters said Thursday that he would resign from the President's reelection campaign if Bush proceeds with plans to normalize U.S. relations with Vietnam before Inauguration Day. "It would be wrong for us to recognize a country that still oppresses the Vietnamese people," said Ky Ngo, a co-chairman of the Bush/Quayle campaign in Orange County. "I oppose that and I think the majority of Vietnamese (Americans) oppose it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery writes about nature and science and lives in Hancock, N.H. and
In Vietnamese mythology, the Eastern Sarus crane is the bird sent from heaven to ferry to God those destined for eternal life. It is an apt species for such a heavenly mission: An other-worldly looking being, it is the tallest flighted bird in the world at five feet, with a red head, long slender beak and slate gray body. Huge yet ethereal, migrating between water and sky, it courts its mate while dancing to an inner music, bowing, arching, springing into the air with wings spread in ecstasy.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days after Saigon fell to the Communists in April 1975, Hanoi's soldiers went from embassy to embassy in the capital of the defeated South, replacing the flags of foreign nations with that of a unified Vietnam. But they bypassed the abandoned U.S. Embassy and never hoisted their flag over it. One journalist who had shunned the helicopter evacuation and remained behind asked a senior Communist official why the U.S. Embassy had been spared. "Because we do not want to humiliate the Americans.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most surprising aspect of U.S.-Vietnamese relations is not how greatly they've improved in the past few years, but how long it took both countries to make the transition from enmity to reconciliation. Japan and the United States, after all, normalized relations in 1951, six years after the end of World War II, and by 1970, 25 years after the war, American tourists were as common a sight on the streets of Tokyo as they were in London or Paris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO TIMES
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War and who became the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered the specter of a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War being the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three college professors--all veterans of the war against the United States--were talking over lunch, and soon the conversation turned, as all conversations here seem to these days, to President Clinton's official visit to Vietnam this week. "I wouldn't expect him to make an apology for the war," said Do Duy Truyen, a Russian-language instructor who was an antiaircraft gunner protecting Hanoi three decades ago. In fact, Truyen wouldn't mind if the war didn't even come up.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To young Vietnamese Americans, it's the hottest music around. To older generations, it's nothing more than Communist propaganda. And to a Little Saigon music industry once hailed as "the Vietnamese Nashville," it could spell doom. The thaw in U.S.-Vietnam relations has flooded music stores from Westminster to Philadelphia with verse and song from a culturally invigorated Vietnam.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In building a community in a new country, Vietnamese Americans also had to rebuild a cultural life from scratch, one that evolved and flourished in virtual isolation from the land that is its source. So says Co Pham, president of the Westminster-based Vietnamese Chamber of Commerce and a longtime (and often embattled) proponent of lifting the U.S. trade embargo against Vietnam, an action President Clinton took Thursday.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Toan Vu came to UC Irvine from Vietnam to find answers--and learned to ask new questions. Delving into the intricacies of Parkinson's disease, he has absorbed into his speech such terms as neurology, movement disorders and myoclonus (involuntary spasms of the muscle). But he has not just learned medical terms during his stay at UCI as part of an educational exchange program.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington and Hanoi have agreed to move ahead on one of the most sensitive issues left from the Vietnam War and start scientific research into the effects of Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant sprayed by the United States in South Vietnam between 1962 and 1971, U.S. diplomats said. The agreement, informal at this point, is designed to identify hot spots where levels of cancer-causing chemicals remain high, to devise methods of cleanup and to study related health problems.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a century after their war came to an end, the United States and Vietnam on Thursday launched a new era of normal economic ties with a trade deal that would grant Americans sweeping rights to do business in a land where they once shed blood, while giving Vietnamese much easier access to the rich U.S. marketplace.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|