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United States Foreign Relations Vietnam

NEWS
November 18, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most surprising aspect of U.S.-Vietnamese relations is not how greatly they've improved in the past few years, but how long it took both countries to make the transition from enmity to reconciliation. Japan and the United States, after all, normalized relations in 1951, six years after the end of World War II, and by 1970, 25 years after the war, American tourists were as common a sight on the streets of Tokyo as they were in London or Paris.
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NEWS
November 18, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sharing a dais with a flower-bedecked bust of revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh, President Clinton on Friday reached beyond Vietnam's government to appeal to the country's overwhelming young population as the force for change in this Communist state. The president, on a historic visit to Vietnam, used carefully worded but obvious language to call for basic human rights, from freedom of religion to the right to political dissent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO TIMES
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War and who became the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered the specter of a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War being the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
NEWS
November 17, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a trip designed to bring formal closure to one of the most painful chapters in American history, Bill Clinton today became the first U.S. president to visit Vietnam since the war ended--and the first ever to visit Hanoi, one of the world's last bastions of Communist rule. Despite the midnight hour of his arrival, Clinton was greeted by thousands and thousands of people lining the streets on the long ride into town from the airport.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three college professors--all veterans of the war against the United States--were talking over lunch, and soon the conversation turned, as all conversations here seem to these days, to President Clinton's official visit to Vietnam this week. "I wouldn't expect him to make an apology for the war," said Do Duy Truyen, a Russian-language instructor who was an antiaircraft gunner protecting Hanoi three decades ago. In fact, Truyen wouldn't mind if the war didn't even come up.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To young Vietnamese Americans, it's the hottest music around. To older generations, it's nothing more than Communist propaganda. And to a Little Saigon music industry once hailed as "the Vietnamese Nashville," it could spell doom. The thaw in U.S.-Vietnam relations has flooded music stores from Westminster to Philadelphia with verse and song from a culturally invigorated Vietnam.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington and Hanoi have agreed to move ahead on one of the most sensitive issues left from the Vietnam War and start scientific research into the effects of Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant sprayed by the United States in South Vietnam between 1962 and 1971, U.S. diplomats said. The agreement, informal at this point, is designed to identify hot spots where levels of cancer-causing chemicals remain high, to devise methods of cleanup and to study related health problems.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a century after their war came to an end, the United States and Vietnam on Thursday launched a new era of normal economic ties with a trade deal that would grant Americans sweeping rights to do business in a land where they once shed blood, while giving Vietnamese much easier access to the rich U.S. marketplace.
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