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United States Foreign Relations Vietnam

NEWS
August 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To young Vietnamese Americans, it's the hottest music around. To older generations, it's nothing more than Communist propaganda. And to a Little Saigon music industry once hailed as "the Vietnamese Nashville," it could spell doom. The thaw in U.S.-Vietnam relations has flooded music stores from Westminster to Philadelphia with verse and song from a culturally invigorated Vietnam.
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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington and Hanoi have agreed to move ahead on one of the most sensitive issues left from the Vietnam War and start scientific research into the effects of Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant sprayed by the United States in South Vietnam between 1962 and 1971, U.S. diplomats said. The agreement, informal at this point, is designed to identify hot spots where levels of cancer-causing chemicals remain high, to devise methods of cleanup and to study related health problems.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a century after their war came to an end, the United States and Vietnam on Thursday launched a new era of normal economic ties with a trade deal that would grant Americans sweeping rights to do business in a land where they once shed blood, while giving Vietnamese much easier access to the rich U.S. marketplace.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John McCain stunned his Vietnamese hosts Friday, saying the "wrong guys" had won the Vietnam War and questioning this country's desire for closer relations with the United States. Even U.S. officials here were taken aback by the timing and bluntness of McCain's comments, which they feared could upset the fragile but improving relationship between Washington and Hanoi.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a throwback to Cold War-era strategies, Vietnam's Communist government today begins a daily satellite TV broadcast to North America aimed at expatriate Vietnamese. While skeptics question the broadcast's impact, timing of the kickoff--three days before the 25th anniversary of the fall of Saigon--has inflamed passions among Vietnamese emigres who view Vietnam's "Liberation Day," April 30, as the blackest day in what they call Black April.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finally, by April 1975, there was something about Vietnam that almost everyone could agree on. After a wrenching decade of bloodshed and protest, the end of the war was near. The Communist North Vietnamese army was sweeping south in violation of a treaty signed two years earlier in Paris, an accord President Nixon had heralded as bringing "peace with honor." America's combat role was over.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another of its ongoing breaks from the past, Vietnam has chosen English over French and Russian as the favored foreign language for students to learn and has turned to its former ideological enemies in the West to help redesign the educational curriculum. Vietnam is already phasing out English-language textbooks written by Russian advisors in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER
As the 25th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War approaches, old foes are searching for ways to build a new relationship on common ground. For one Viet Cong war hero, that's Jane Fonda. Lt. Gen. Phan Trung Kien, a senior member of the Vietnamese military leadership who rarely ventures into the public eye, met Wednesday with Defense Secretary William S. Cohen as the American ended the first trip to Vietnam by a U.S. defense chief in nearly 30 years.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, Dr. Co Pham has advocated reconciliation and free trade between the United States and Vietnam, engendering such fierce protests in Orange County's Little Saigon community that he hired armed guards to protect his medical clinic. Now, as the two nations edge closer to a sweeping trade accord nearly 25 years after the Vietnam War's end, the native of Hanoi has stepped up his controversial campaign.
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