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United States Foreign Relations West Germany

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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Four victors of World War II and the two halves of defeated Germany agreed here Tuesday to begin historic talks "shortly" to reunify Germany and to discuss the security concerns of neighboring states. After a frenetic day of bilateral talks among their foreign ministers, the six nations issued a brief statement that, however vague, begins a process that will finally lead to a peace settlement with Germany 45 years after the end of the war.
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NEWS
September 16, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl, declaring that American forces in the Persian Gulf "are also defending our interests," said Saturday that West Germany will contribute about $2 billion to support the U.S.-led effort. Secretary of State James A. Baker III said later that the West German pledge had raised total foreign contributions to more than $20 billion, substantially increasing the chances of eventually ending the crisis without warfare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
This is a lesson in humility. When news came that the Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn was going to play Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, some of us got quite excited. To neophyte ears-- these neophyte ears--the name suggested a special relationship to Beethoven, the heaven-storming master of classical music. Reality turned out to be a bit drier.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | Reuters
Chancellor Helmut Kohl pledged Thursday that West Germany will do everything within its means to support the United States and other nations to defuse the Persian Gulf crisis. Kohl, who meets Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Saturday, repeated his promise to press for a constitutional amendment to allow German forces to be deployed in the gulf region.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From Reuters
The Bonn government, troubled by U.S. allegations that West German companies helped Moammar Kadafi build a chemical weapons plant, said Tuesday that it had ordered several firms to end current deals with Libya. The West German Cabinet also agreed to tighten controls of exports to sensitive areas and planned heavy fines and prison sentences of up to five years for businessmen violating export laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
An American tour devoted to the work of contemporary West German Neo-Expressionist Anselm Kiefer opens today at the Museum of Contemporary Art and is widely regarded as the international art event of the year. The reclusive 43-year-old artist is seen in art circles as the emergent figure of his generation and possibly a talent of the magnitude of, say, Jackson Pollock.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush expressed surprise Wednesday that the Soviet Union had withdrawn its strong opposition to the U.S.-backed reunification talks of the two German states and permitted "a major breakthrough" in the process. "This surprised me that they (the Soviets) were willing to make an agreement on that," Bush said. "I mean to be very elated about . . . the fact that the Secretary (of State James A.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany's foreign minister Wednesday endorsed a Bush Administration proposal to assure continued U.S. influence in a post-Cold War Europe, even though America's military power may be overshadowed by the economic might of the 12-nation European Community. After meetings with President Bush and Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sense of occasion surrounding the London NATO summit that ended here Friday left few in any doubt that the changes agreed to by the alliance's 16 member countries represent a watershed development. But the London summit is likely to shape Europe's future in ways that were hardly mentioned in the afterglow of Friday's agreement.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | Reuters
U.S. Ambassador Vernon A. Walters will ride a train loaded with chemical weapons to reassure the public that their movement through densely populated areas poses no danger, the U.S. Embassy said Thursday. Walters will board the train tonight in Miesau in the southwest to travel to the North Sea port of Nordenham, where the poison gas shells will be loaded on ships and taken to the Pacific for destruction, the embassy said. Over the next week, two trains a night will take 400 tons of U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald Reagan took a chisel to a remnant of the Berlin Wall on Wednesday and strolled into formerly Communist East Berlin on a visit heavy with symbolism, drawing tears and shouts of "Thank you!" for his role in liberating the East. The former President and his wife, Nancy, were cheered by thousands as they traced the scarred path left by the wall, a hated symbol of East-West confrontation that is fast disappearing as Germany reunites and Europe recovers from 40 years of division.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with staggering bills for German reunification and the need to financially prod along the Soviet military withdrawal, America's richest ally has done little to aid the U.S. action in the Persian Gulf. Backing up Operation Desert Shield, the American effort to counter Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait, has been a low priority in West Germany, and its allies have begun to take notice. Only Britain and France have made significant contributions of military forces to the U.S.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl on Friday invited President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to witness the Cold War's demise at Oct. 3 ceremonies celebrating German reunification, although Bonn and Moscow are still haggling over some details of the historic merger. Kohl telephoned the two leaders to go over the remaining areas of contention and to ask them to take part in the festivities, Hans Klein, a spokesman for the Bonn government, said.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven West German warships slipped out of the North Sea port of Wilhelmshaven and headed for the Mediterranean on Thursday, leaving in their wake a heated debate about the military role of a united Germany. The ships--five minesweepers and two support vessels--are to relieve U.S. warships ordered to leave the Mediterranean and move into the troubled Persian Gulf, along with ships of Britain, France, the Netherlands and Belgium.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 10 days since the invasion of Kuwait, American officials have combined promises of American friendship, offers of Kuwaiti money and the threat of Iraqi aggression to broker a series of deals that have cemented support for the drive against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. So far, the biggest beneficiary seems to have been Turkey. In a series of telephone calls last weekend and a visit by Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the United States' most important Western allies differed publicly over key aspects of Europe's political future here Friday but agreed that America's nuclear umbrella remains essential to the Continent's ultimate security. West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, whose relations are notoriously tepid, appeared to go out of their way to be jovial at a joint press conference concluding two days of official talks here.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first meeting of the two Germanys and the four victorious World War II powers on the subject of German unity was held here Wednesday, and the participants agreed to invite Poland to attend sessions at which the Polish-German border issue is discussed. The head of the host West German delegation, diplomat Dieter Kastrup, said that at this first meeting, the Germanys, the United States, the Soviet Union, Britain and France discussed procedural questions and an agenda for further meetings.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
A closely guarded truck convoy Thursday began taking away a vast cache of deadly nerve gas secretly stored by the United States near this small West German town for more than 20 years. West German authorities said someone phoned in a bomb threat against the toxic convoy but that the transport of the first shipment of nerve gas proceeded without any hitches.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | JACK NELSON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Wednesday won a pledge from leaders of the major industrial democracies to end a longstanding deadlock on trade negotiations that U.S. officials had feared could plunge the world economy into chaos and recession. In a final communique ending the three-day economic summit, the leaders declared that the successful outcome of the current trade talks, known as the Uruguay Round, "has the highest priority on the international economic agenda." U.S.
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