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April 9, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like hundreds of thousands of his fellow Kosovo Albanians, Bashkim Millaku was forced at gunpoint to leave his home and his country by Serbian troops last week. On his way, the 36-year-old father of two was caught in a roundup of 400 men, held prisoner for three days and two nights, tormented mentally and physically, robbed and denied food and water. He was used as a human shield. By the time Millaku reached Albania on Saturday night, he was in shock.
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NEWS
April 1, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the United States, the arrest of Slobodan Milosevic marks a major victory in a saga that has involved massive amounts of American leadership, diplomacy and bombs--all of which Washington never wanted to expend. But in the end, for all the contentious debate over U.S. intervention in the Balkans, bringing the former Yugoslav dictator to justice was one thing that both the Clinton and Bush administrations agreed on.
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NEWS
April 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant escalation of tensions between the two Balkan neighbors, Albania on Tuesday charged that Yugoslav troops had violated its territory, shelling and burning homes in a remote border village before withdrawing. Yugoslav officials denied the report, but international peace monitors in the border area said Yugoslav troops had entered the village of Kamenica and set part of it on fire before withdrawing after 1 1/2 hours.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Balkan issues dominated the State Department's agenda Friday, with visits by Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, Montenegrin President Milo Djukanovic and Ibrahim Rugova, the leader of Kosovo's ethnic Albanians. Rugova said he and Secretary of State Colin L. Powell have an "understanding in general" that independence for Kosovo should be supported. But a State Department official said the independence issue never came up during Powell's meeting with Rugova.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they boarded the Fati Tours bus from Slovenia to Kosovo last July, Baljaj Naim, Zogaj Enver and Hrecaj Haljit were much like the 51 other ethnic Albanian passengers. Like the others, the three men were contract workers going home--their pockets full of hard-earned construction wages--to wives, children and parents they hadn't seen for months.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 500 exhausted, emaciated Kosovo men of fighting age staggered across the border into Albania on Sunday, telling harrowing tales of being beaten, starved and forced to fight one another like gladiators before their Serbian captors.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something strange is going on in this Kosovo Albanian village in what was once a hard-line guerrilla stronghold, where NATO accuses Serbs of committing genocide. An estimated 15,000 displaced ethnic Albanians live in and around Svetlje, in northern Kosovo, and hundreds of young men are everywhere, strolling along the dirt roads or lying on the grass on a spring day.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslav air force fighter planes bombed Slovenia's main airports and border crossings Friday, killing soldiers and civilians before the Belgrade government claimed it had pounded the rebellious republic into submission and would hold its fire. A European Community delegation announced early today in Zagreb that Slovenia and a second breakaway republic, Croatia, had agreed to temporarily suspend their independence declarations. There was no official confirmation from either republic.
NEWS
May 1, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With air raid sirens wailing on a day of intense NATO bombing, the Rev. Jesse Jackson embraced three U.S. prisoners of war in a Serbian military judge's chambers Friday evening and led a prayer for their freedom. "Help is on the way and hope is in the air, and soon--very soon--you will know peace and family," the civil rights leader said in a huddle with the servicemen in the first video of the trio aired since their capture a month ago.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III admitted Friday that he was unable to dissuade Yugoslavia's independence-minded republics from breaking up the 73-year-old federation. "What I heard here today has not allayed my concerns, nor will it allay the concerns of others" in the U.S. Administration and the international community, Baker said after spending almost 10 hours in meetings with federal officials and the presidents of all six constituent republics.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Clinton, responding to positive developments in Yugoslavia, notified congressional leaders Friday that he was lifting trade and financial sanctions against the Balkan nation. The easing of sanctions does not apply to former President Slobodan Milosevic, his family, his cronies or indicted war crimes suspects. All told, 81 people will remain under sanctions restrictions.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Reuters
U.S. envoys held talks with Yugoslav officials Monday and said they were confident that peace can be restored to a part of Serbia neighboring Kosovo where ethnic Albanian guerrillas are fighting Serbian authorities. William Montgomery, the American ambassador to Yugoslavia, and U.S. Balkans envoy James Pardew held talks with Serbian Deputy Prime Minister Nebojsa Covic in the southern town of Bujanovac, near the boundary with Kosovo.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The postwar wall of distrust between Yugoslavia and the United States crumbled a bit more Monday as Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica shook hands and spoke briefly here with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The surprise meeting was the highest-level contact between the two governments in the nearly 18 months since the U.S. led a 78-day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia to end a vicious civil war in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Calling it a "debt we owe to an entire generation," Yugoslavia's new democratic government resumed diplomatic relations Friday with the United States, Germany, France and Britain--its foes during last year's conflict in Kosovo. President Clinton marked the event with a promise of about $45 million in emergency food aid to help the Yugoslav people through the winter.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Bill Clinton and his weary advisors, it's a sobering thought: The president's foreign policy legacy may well be determined more by how he handles multiple crises during his last three months in office than by anything he's accomplished over the previous seven years.
NEWS
October 15, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. envoy James C. O'Brien on Saturday called for Yugoslavia's new government to quickly release ethnic Albanian political prisoners held in Serbian jails and for the people of Kosovo to tolerate the return of former Serbian residents. "Serbs who want to return home should now have the chance," O'Brien, envoy to the Balkans, said at a news conference here.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ethnic Albanians opened fire Thursday on international peacekeepers trying to prevent another revenge attack on Serbs, while hundreds of Albanians elsewhere in Kosovo protested the presence of Russian troops who they say sympathize with Serbs. In the town of Velika Krusa, meanwhile, several hundred mourners wept as 75 coffins were lowered into two rows of fresh graves.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakdown of Kosovo peace talks and intensified fighting along the Albanian-Yugoslav border have increased concern among humanitarian aid organizations about the safety of the more than 100,000 refugees still camped here. Heavy NATO bombing and Serbian shelling Monday near the Morine border crossing--as well as reports of shelling along Macedonia's border with Kosovo--raised fears among international aid workers that the brinkmanship could spill over the border into Kukes.
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Last week, Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush asked his chief foreign policy advisor, Stanford University professor Condoleezza Rice, for an emergency lesson on how to pronounce all those troublesome Serbian names. "It's a good thing I'm a Slavic scholar," joked Rice, who is fluent in Russian. But the strategy behind the tutorial was no joking matter.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when the world had about concluded that economic sanctions are close to useless against entrenched dictators, the sudden downfall of Slobodan Milosevic in Yugoslavia has sent a different message. Sometimes the strategy seems to work. No analyst is claiming that the economic and political isolation imposed on Yugoslavia by the United States and its allies is the only reason Milosevic was forced from power.
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