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United States Foreign Relations Zaire

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NEWS
March 12, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, facing mounting pressure from Capitol Hill and American organizations focused on Africa, is considering seizure of the vast personal fortune of Zaire President Mobutu Sese Seko to force him to surrender power in the mineral-rich Central African nation.
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NEWS
May 22, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It is obvious what the United States wants of Laurent Kabila and the country he has renamed Congo: democratic government, speedy elections, safety for refugees, respect for human rights and an end to Marxist claptrap. The big question, African experts say, is whether the United States has the will and influence and interest and patience to get what it wants. A State Department official insists that there is no doubt on that score.
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NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Protesters chanting "Americans, get out!" burned a U.S. flag Wednesday, and the prime minister angrily accused the international community of ignoring the rebellion in eastern Zaire. About 200 people demonstrated at the U.S. Embassy, calling for the expulsion of U.S. Ambassador Daniel Simpson and his staff. Zairian soldiers broke up the demonstration when the flag was burned. The U.S. State Department on Tuesday authorized embassy employees to leave Zaire.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's anger to go around in the destitute streets of Kinshasa, and it is not all directed against President Mobutu Sese Seko or rebel leader Laurent Kabila, the two men locked in a dance of death over who will lead this country of 45 million people.
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
The United States, throwing its weight behind Zaire peace efforts, sent Assistant Secretary for African Affairs George Moose to join African leaders at a one-day summit on Zaire. The African leaders repeated a call for an immediate cease-fire to allow negotiations to end the war in Africa's third-largest country. The rebels, who were not invited, said the meeting would solve nothing.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet this weekend with foreign ministers of three African members of the U.N. Security Council to see if they would support a resolution authorizing military action against Iraq, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush will name Ambassador Melissa Foelsch Wells as ambassador to Zaire, the White House said Friday.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | From Reuters
Zairean President Mobutu Sese Seko met Sunday with Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi and a senior U.S. envoy in southern France in his most serious bid yet to revive a peace accord to end Angola's 14-year civil war. Mobutu talked with Savimbi and Herman Cohen, assistant secretary of state for African affairs. Cohen played a key role in talks in Washington earlier this month when President Bush persuaded Savimbi to return to the conference table.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As pressure mounts from Washington to Brussels for Zaire's President Mobutu Sese Seko to quit, only France, which has major economic interests in Central Africa, has not joined the chorus. On Friday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Jacques Rummelhardt called on Mobutu, one of Africa's longest-ruling dictators, to hold talks with Laurent Kabila, whose rebel forces have been gobbling up Zairian territory and are demanding that the 66-year-old president resign by Sunday.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration reportedly is sending "several hundred" U.S. troops to western Africa to prepare for a possible evacuation of about 650 U.S. citizens from Zaire and has asked dependents of U.S. Embassy personnel to leave the strife-torn Central African nation. Speaking on condition of anonymity, Pentagon sources told the Associated Press that the U.S. forces had already begun their movement toward Africa as part of a "joint task force." They said up to 250 U.S.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As pressure mounts from Washington to Brussels for Zaire's President Mobutu Sese Seko to quit, only France, which has major economic interests in Central Africa, has not joined the chorus. On Friday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Jacques Rummelhardt called on Mobutu, one of Africa's longest-ruling dictators, to hold talks with Laurent Kabila, whose rebel forces have been gobbling up Zairian territory and are demanding that the 66-year-old president resign by Sunday.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration reportedly is sending "several hundred" U.S. troops to western Africa to prepare for a possible evacuation of about 650 U.S. citizens from Zaire and has asked dependents of U.S. Embassy personnel to leave the strife-torn Central African nation. Speaking on condition of anonymity, Pentagon sources told the Associated Press that the U.S. forces had already begun their movement toward Africa as part of a "joint task force." They said up to 250 U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
The United States, throwing its weight behind Zaire peace efforts, sent Assistant Secretary for African Affairs George Moose to join African leaders at a one-day summit on Zaire. The African leaders repeated a call for an immediate cease-fire to allow negotiations to end the war in Africa's third-largest country. The rebels, who were not invited, said the meeting would solve nothing.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Protesters chanting "Americans, get out!" burned a U.S. flag Wednesday, and the prime minister angrily accused the international community of ignoring the rebellion in eastern Zaire. About 200 people demonstrated at the U.S. Embassy, calling for the expulsion of U.S. Ambassador Daniel Simpson and his staff. Zairian soldiers broke up the demonstration when the flag was burned. The U.S. State Department on Tuesday authorized embassy employees to leave Zaire.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Zairian rebel leader Laurent Kabila secretly flew to South Africa and met with U.S. officials trying to kick-start the Zaire peace process. Kabila met in Pretoria with South African and U.S. officials who have been trying to arrange a meeting between the rebels and Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko's government, according to a U.S. government official in Washington.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Ambassadors of the United States and 13 other countries meeting in Canada's capital gave approval Friday to a multinational humanitarian mission to aid refugees in eastern Zaire. "Now, the multinational force is formally constituted," said Paul Heinbecker, a Canadian foreign affairs official who chaired a meeting of the ambassadors.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Zairian rebel leader Laurent Kabila secretly flew to South Africa and met with U.S. officials trying to kick-start the Zaire peace process. Kabila met in Pretoria with South African and U.S. officials who have been trying to arrange a meeting between the rebels and Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko's government, according to a U.S. government official in Washington.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, facing mounting pressure from Capitol Hill and American organizations focused on Africa, is considering seizure of the vast personal fortune of Zaire President Mobutu Sese Seko to force him to surrender power in the mineral-rich Central African nation.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush will name Ambassador Melissa Foelsch Wells as ambassador to Zaire, the White House said Friday.
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