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United States Foriegn Relations North Korea

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NEWS
September 9, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton moved Thursday to try to calm fears in Seoul about the deepening United States dialogue with North Korea, personally promising South Korean Foreign Minister Han Sung Joo that "we'll be there with you," according to Han. The President's remarks, at the end of a White House meeting, were the latest and most significant in a series of efforts by the Clinton Administration to reassure South Korea that its ties with the United States will not be harmed by the talks with Pyongyang.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word leaked out that the Clinton administration might relax its economic embargo of North Korea in exchange for the shutdown of a suspected nuclear arms facility, New York businessman Allen Wenzel thought of one thing. Magnesite. Wenzel's wish was granted when a historic agreement was signed in Geneva in November 1994, opening up limited trade channels between the longtime ideological enemies in exchange for North Korean compliance with an international nuclear arms control treaty.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word leaked out that the Clinton administration might relax its economic embargo of North Korea in exchange for the shutdown of a suspected nuclear arms facility, New York businessman Allen Wenzel thought of one thing. Magnesite. Wenzel's wish was granted when a historic agreement was signed in Geneva in November 1994, opening up limited trade channels between the longtime ideological enemies in exchange for North Korean compliance with an international nuclear arms control treaty.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton moved Thursday to try to calm fears in Seoul about the deepening United States dialogue with North Korea, personally promising South Korean Foreign Minister Han Sung Joo that "we'll be there with you," according to Han. The President's remarks, at the end of a White House meeting, were the latest and most significant in a series of efforts by the Clinton Administration to reassure South Korea that its ties with the United States will not be harmed by the talks with Pyongyang.
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