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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
For the second day in a row, Southern Californians were rattled by earthquakes Friday morning. After the United States Geological Survey reported a 3.9-magnitude quake in Borrego Springs after 11 p.m. Thursday, a 2.6-magnitude temblor was registered in La Verne about 2 a.m. Friday. The quakes come after La Verne experienced  a series of temblors - including two above 3.5-magnitude - just a day earlier. More than 360 people reported feeling the Borrego Springs quake, with one person 150 miles away in Thousand Oaks feeling the shaking, according to the USGS website.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
For the second day in a row, Southern Californians were rattled by earthquakes Friday morning. After the United States Geological Survey reported a 3.9-magnitude quake in Borrego Springs after 11 p.m. Thursday, a 2.6-magnitude temblor was registered in La Verne about 2 a.m. Friday. The quakes come after La Verne experienced  a series of temblors - including two above 3.5-magnitude - just a day earlier. More than 360 people reported feeling the Borrego Springs quake, with one person 150 miles away in Thousand Oaks feeling the shaking, according to the USGS website.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa and Ari B. Bloomekatz
The messages came in French and English in the minutes and hours after a magnitude 7 earthquake struck Haiti on Jan. 12: "heavy earth quake right now!" "I see at a distance clouds of dust." "Hundreds of dead body in the collapse of Hotel Montana." "parts of the Palace have collapsed." "Phones seem to be out. . . . Communication is at a standstill." Before authorities could begin to assess the damage, before reporters and aid workers could arrive on the scene, Twitter and other social media sites offered a quick portrait of the damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa and Ari B. Bloomekatz
The messages came in French and English in the minutes and hours after a magnitude 7 earthquake struck Haiti on Jan. 12: "heavy earth quake right now!" "I see at a distance clouds of dust." "Hundreds of dead body in the collapse of Hotel Montana." "parts of the Palace have collapsed." "Phones seem to be out. . . . Communication is at a standstill." Before authorities could begin to assess the damage, before reporters and aid workers could arrive on the scene, Twitter and other social media sites offered a quick portrait of the damage.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists have developed a system that will enable the government to warn California residents of the likelihood of a strong aftershock after an earthquake. The system is based largely on the history of 62 earthquakes and their aftershocks, but it also grew out of an expanded understanding of the dynamics of major quakes. The same data used to develop that system also gave the scientists an insight that could relieve some public anxiety after the next large earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists in 20 countries have joined together to create a "world stress map" that will show patterns of geological stress around the entire planet. That, in turn, should help experts identify areas that are more likely to generate major earthquakes than had been thought. "The first order of business is to establish global patterns," said geologist Mary Lou Zoback of the U.S. Geological Survey's Menlo Park office, who is coordinating the project.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
NEWS
April 26, 1990
An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.9 struck in China today, the United States Geological Survey said.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A sharp earthquake that went "kerchunk" in the night caused little damage but woke up hundreds of people in Northern California's wine country early today, officials reported. The 2:07 a.m. quake had a magnitude of 3.4 and was centered 7 miles northwest of Napa, according to the United States Geological Survey in Menlo Park.
WORLD
November 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A powerful earthquake shook buildings along northern Chile's coast, killing at least two people and injuring at least 117. It was felt 1,400 miles away in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Dozens of road workers were reported trapped in and around a highway tunnel that collapsed in the area hit hardest by the magnitude 7.7 quake. The worst damage occurred in Tocopilla, where Mayor Luis Moyano said at least 1,200 houses had been flattened, leaving 4,000 people homeless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists in 20 countries have joined together to create a "world stress map" that will show patterns of geological stress around the entire planet. That, in turn, should help experts identify areas that are more likely to generate major earthquakes than had been thought. "The first order of business is to establish global patterns," said geologist Mary Lou Zoback of the U.S. Geological Survey's Menlo Park office, who is coordinating the project.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists have developed a system that will enable the government to warn California residents of the likelihood of a strong aftershock after an earthquake. The system is based largely on the history of 62 earthquakes and their aftershocks, but it also grew out of an expanded understanding of the dynamics of major quakes. The same data used to develop that system also gave the scientists an insight that could relieve some public anxiety after the next large earthquake.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
A small earthquake struck Sunday, the latest in a series of minor tremors that have hit this hilly suburban community over the weekend. The 1.5-magnitude quake struck at 6:32 a.m. two miles west of the city and 8.3 miles below the surface, according to the United States Geological Survey. It was at least the seventh small quake in the area since Friday. The largest was a 1.9 magnitude temblor on Friday night, followed by a 1.8 jolt Saturday and others leading to Sunday's activity, according to a USGS website.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | JANE HULSE
Salty ocean water is not contaminating underground water supplies in Ventura County as much as was previously feared, according to the initial finding from a four-year study. Leaky wells and geological fault lines are responsible for some of the poor quality water, rather than all of it coming from the ocean, a water expert said Wednesday. "It's welcome news," said Jim Gross, ground-water resources manager for the United Water Conservation District.
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