Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Golf Association
IN THE NEWS

United States Golf Association

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 6, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
The seasons are changing and, just as the crocuses herald the coming of spring, the PGA Tour has decamped from Hawaii for California, the first leg in its Sherman's march toward Augusta in May. And so it's the right time for Ron Drapeau to reflect on the continuing battle between Carlsbad-based Callaway Golf Co., which he heads as chairman and chief executive, and the United States Golf Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 6, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
The seasons are changing and, just as the crocuses herald the coming of spring, the PGA Tour has decamped from Hawaii for California, the first leg in its Sherman's march toward Augusta in May. And so it's the right time for Ron Drapeau to reflect on the continuing battle between Carlsbad-based Callaway Golf Co., which he heads as chairman and chief executive, and the United States Golf Assn.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 29, 1990
The United States Golf Assn. has agreed in an out-of-court settlement to recognize the Ping Eye-2 square-grooved clubs, and the manufacturer has agreed to stop making them. Karsten Manufacturing Corp. had sued the USGA for $100 million after the USGA refused to recognize the clubs, which have U-shaped grooves on the clubfaces as opposed to traditional V-shaped grooves. The settlement affects USGA events such as the U.S. Open but not the PGA Tour.
SPORTS
October 10, 2002 | THOMAS BONK
Sometime today, the U.S. Golf Assn. will name Bethpage Black in Farmingdale, N.Y., as the site of the 2009 U.S. Open. What does that mean for Riviera Country Club? "We hope they consider inviting us another year," USGA President David Fay said. A lot can happen, presumably, between now and 2009, with the exception of Riviera Country Club hosting the U.S. Open.
SPORTS
June 17, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE
Britain's Nick Faldo pointed his putter in mock anger Saturday on the 17th green at a group picketing the U.S. Open just outside a fence at the Medinah Country Club. Faldo seemed annoyed by the noise the picketers were making but made his putt. Representative of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union are protesting the USGA's sale of merchandise manufactured by LaMode du Golf, which manufactures golf shirts and other items.
SPORTS
July 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Reacting to criticism that its 1990 championship is at a club that excludes blacks, the Professional Golfers' Assn. said Saturday it will consider membership policies in selecting future title sites. The United States Golf Assn., which runs both the men's and women's U.S. Opens, said it also would re-examine its policies. "Exclusionary membership factors of a host site are a factor which must be considered," Patrick J.
SPORTS
January 23, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
You have to go a long way to find controversy in golf, which is just the way it happens in a sport so neatly pressed and packaged that caddies aren't allowed to wear shorts. Anyway, the ongoing dispute between two of golf's most venerable institutions, Arnold Palmer and the United States Golf Assn., has managed to spring the game into the major leagues of sports controversy.
SPORTS
October 10, 2002 | THOMAS BONK
Sometime today, the U.S. Golf Assn. will name Bethpage Black in Farmingdale, N.Y., as the site of the 2009 U.S. Open. What does that mean for Riviera Country Club? "We hope they consider inviting us another year," USGA President David Fay said. A lot can happen, presumably, between now and 2009, with the exception of Riviera Country Club hosting the U.S. Open.
SPORTS
December 4, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Services
The first black nominated to the governing body of American golf said his name wouldn't have been put up had it not been for the membership controversy in 1990 at Shoal Creek, a country club in Birmingham, Ala. "My nomination was a result of Shoal Creek," said John Merchant, 58, an attorney in New Britain, Conn. He must be approved by the United States Golf Assn.
SPORTS
August 7, 2002 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long and often bitter debate about setting technological limits on golf clubs took an unexpected turn Tuesday when the game's ruling bodies reversed their positions and scaled back what they previously had decided to allow. The U.S. Golf Assn. and the Royal and Ancient announced an agreement to set the coefficient of restitution (COR)--the measure of the springlike effect of golf balls struck by drivers--at .830 beginning in 2003 in the United States and at the British Open.
SPORTS
July 21, 2001 | PETER YOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most top amateur golfers have heard the voice. It whispers after a particularly good shot, it tempts after an under-par round and beckons after each high finish in a tournament. "You're ready to play professionally," it says. The winner of the Southern California Amateur championship this weekend at La Jolla Country Club might hear that voice. If so, it may be more difficult to ignore now than ever before because earlier this month the U.S. Golf Assn.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2001 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors sliced 19% off Callaway Golf Co.'s stock Friday after the premium golf-club maker reported plunging sales and profit, largely because its latest Big Bertha driver, the ERC II, has been a big bomb. Callaway keeps marketing the ERC II even though the U.S. Golf Assn. has banned it from regulation play. Many retailers--including more than 1,200 pro shops, by the company's own estimate--refuse to sell the driver.
SPORTS
June 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ford Olinger isn't ready to claim victory over the U.S. Golf Assn. after a Supreme Court ruling Monday, but he feels it's pretty close. "Until I see it in writing from the appellate court saying, 'OK, Ford, you win,' we still have to hold a little skepticism," said Olinger, who has a degenerative condition in both hips. "But we're definitely glad that Casey [Martin] won, and it's looking a lot better for us." The Supreme Court on Monday threw out a decision by the 7th U.S.
SPORTS
January 23, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
You have to go a long way to find controversy in golf, which is just the way it happens in a sport so neatly pressed and packaged that caddies aren't allowed to wear shorts. Anyway, the ongoing dispute between two of golf's most venerable institutions, Arnold Palmer and the United States Golf Assn., has managed to spring the game into the major leagues of sports controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1999 | BOBBY CUZA
As part of its commitment to making the sport both more accessible and affordable, the United States Golf Assn. has awarded $25,000 to a junior golf program in Mission Hills. The grant will allow the Pacoima Junior Golf Assn. to expand its scope, spokesman John Laing said, ideally putting golf clubs in the hands of hundreds of kids who may never have otherwise gained exposure to the sport.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2001 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors sliced 19% off Callaway Golf Co.'s stock Friday after the premium golf-club maker reported plunging sales and profit, largely because its latest Big Bertha driver, the ERC II, has been a big bomb. Callaway keeps marketing the ERC II even though the U.S. Golf Assn. has banned it from regulation play. Many retailers--including more than 1,200 pro shops, by the company's own estimate--refuse to sell the driver.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The game of golf, which prizes courtesy and often demands silence, is now in an uproar over the product that has revolutionized the sport in the last decade: those oversized metal drivers used by low-handicappers and duffers alike. The U.S. Golf Assn., the game's governing body and rules arbiter, is mulling whether to "outlaw" some or all of the big drivers and other high-tech clubs on grounds they're undermining the game's integrity--in other words, making it too easy.
SPORTS
December 4, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Services
The first black nominated to the governing body of American golf said his name wouldn't have been put up had it not been for the membership controversy in 1990 at Shoal Creek, a country club in Birmingham, Ala. "My nomination was a result of Shoal Creek," said John Merchant, 58, an attorney in New Britain, Conn. He must be approved by the United States Golf Assn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|