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April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
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WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - One year after a 25-year-old diplomat from the Chicago area was killed in a car bombing in southern Afghanistan, the U.S. Embassy in Kabul remembered Anne Smedinghoff on Monday by reading poetry and releasing balloons in a courtyard that was named for her. “She was a truly remarkable young woman and friend,” U.S. Ambassador James B. Cunningham said in a solemn ceremony on a sun-splashed afternoon in Kabul. The River Forest, Ill., native is the only State Department diplomat to die in the 13-year war in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government was ordered Tuesday to pay the heirs of amateur filmmaker Abraham Zapruder $16 million for seizing one of the nation's most macabre artifacts--the 26-second film capturing President John F. Kennedy's final moments. An arbitration panel charged with determining the value of the film said that the figure might be on the low side.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A proposal that would delay a possible U.S. military strike and give Syria's government 45 days to come into compliance with an international chemical weapons treaty could get a vote in the Senate as it considers the president's request to authorize force. Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said the Senate will hold its first procedural vote on Wednesday on the resolution passed last week by the Foreign Relations Committee to authorize force against Syria. That resolution faces an uncertain fate as still more senators announced their opposition to the plan as it is currently written.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Bill L. Walters, who told a congressional committee in June that he was broke after defaulting on nearly $100 million in loans obtained from a Denver thrift with the help of Neil Bush, is now living in the lap of luxury here. In February, a trust for Walters' wife, Jacqueline, bought a $1.9-million gated estate near Newport Bay, according to county records reviewed by The Times.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wen Ho Lee walked out of court a free man Wednesday after a federal judge repeatedly apologized for incarcerating him for nine months without trial and angrily rebuked the Clinton administration for its handling of a case that "embarrassed this entire nation." In a morning marked by high drama, laughter and tears of joy, the former Los Alamos nuclear weapon scientist agreed in thickly accented English to a negotiated deal that brings an abrupt end to the highly controversial case.
NEWS
September 3, 1989
The new president of Panama met with government officials to start forming a Cabinet after calling for better U.S. ties. However, provisional President Francisco Rodriguez ruled out elections until Washington lifts economic sanctions. In a speech before his first day in office, Rodriguez said he will lead Panama to "a new democracy as soon as American aggression ceases and the funds arbitrarily withheld by the United States government are returned."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ and JOHN POPE
Alicia Feuchter, a junior at Fullerton Union High School, has been chosen to participate in Presidential Classroom, a leadership program in Washington. The program gives students from across the nation an opportunity to attend sessions of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, as well as briefings with a number of government organizations, including the Central Intelligence Agency. Feuchter, 16, will be in Washington from June 29 to July 6.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - One year after a 25-year-old diplomat from the Chicago area was killed in a car bombing in southern Afghanistan, the U.S. Embassy in Kabul remembered Anne Smedinghoff on Monday by reading poetry and releasing balloons in a courtyard that was named for her. “She was a truly remarkable young woman and friend,” U.S. Ambassador James B. Cunningham said in a solemn ceremony on a sun-splashed afternoon in Kabul. The River Forest, Ill., native is the only State Department diplomat to die in the 13-year war in Afghanistan.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration on Friday sharply rejected Fidel Castro's sarcastic call for U.S. ships to come and pick up Cubans unhappy with his rule. Officials expressed worry about a possible wave of refugees if Cubans take Castro seriously. The State Department also said it has officially protested to Cuba for its accusing the United States of inciting dozens of Cubans to seek asylum in foreign embassies in Havana in recent days.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL and WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration's rapid initial approval of this month's coup in Venezuela has tarnished its status as self-proclaimed champion of democracy and the rule of law in Latin America. Moreover, the reaction to the attempted ouster of President Hugo Chavez especially rankled Latin leaders because it followed recent trade and security measures in which the U.S. has been seen as contradicting its principles. The practical effects could include an erosion in support for U.S.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has come face to face with the limits of the American presidency. Last week, the Senate dealt him a major energy policy defeat when it thwarted his plan to drill for oil in the Arctic wilderness. He was defied in the Middle East as Secretary of State Colin L. Powell returned from a lengthy, much-touted mission unable to win a cease-fire between Israelis and Palestinians.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lawyer for President Bush on Monday defended alleged lying by the Clinton administration in a Supreme Court case that centers on whether government officials can be sued if they lie to cover up crucial facts. The case has nothing to do with Paula Corbin Jones or Monica S. Lewinsky but instead concerns the Clinton administration's support for the Guatemalan military.
NEWS
March 2, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of the American heartland, far from the feared target of an attack, President Bush said Friday that concerns about a nuclear strike by terrorists were behind the continuing operation of a "shadow government" ready to take over if Washington is destroyed. "Until this country has routed out terrorists wherever they try to hide, we're not safe," Bush said on a trip to Iowa that mixed policy and politics.
NEWS
January 31, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The General Accounting Office, the investigative agency of Congress, announced Wednesday that it would sue the White House for refusing to reveal the inner workings of Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force, foreshadowing a high-stakes constitutional battle laced with political overtones.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with growing legal and political challenges, Vice President Dick Cheney stepped forward Sunday to vigorously defend the administration's handling of the collapse of Enron Corp.--and his own refusal to release details of his meetings with Enron and other industry executives in formulating the Bush administration's energy policy. Cheney's defiance puts the administration on course for a legal clash with Congress' investigative arm, the nonpartisan General Accounting Office.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A proposal that would delay a possible U.S. military strike and give Syria's government 45 days to come into compliance with an international chemical weapons treaty could get a vote in the Senate as it considers the president's request to authorize force. Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said the Senate will hold its first procedural vote on Wednesday on the resolution passed last week by the Foreign Relations Committee to authorize force against Syria. That resolution faces an uncertain fate as still more senators announced their opposition to the plan as it is currently written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988 | GREGORY F. TREVERTON, Gregory F. Treverton is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York and author of "Covert Action: The Limits of Intervention in the Post-War World," (Basic Books, 1987).
If nothing else, our experience in Panama illustrates the perils of intervention. It all seemed so perfect: a leader who trafficked in drugs and money with both Sandinistas and Cubans, and so was unacceptable to all and sundry in the United States. If Washington couldn't impose its will in a good cause there, where could it? From the beginning, though, the broad U.S. consensus over Panama should have been worrying. Even if our actions to topple Gen. Manuel A.
NEWS
January 14, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior Bush administration officials defended themselves Sunday for not alerting the president and the public that thousands of employees and investors were likely to lose large amounts of money in the failing Enron Corp., arguing that the giant energy company already was doomed by the time its executives began to seek help from Washington last fall. In addition, Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill said that "in the broad scheme of things," he was not necessarily surprised that Enron sought U.S.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Enron Corp. scandal is approaching a stage where questions about the investigative process may threaten the White House as much as revelations about its substantive dealings with the bankrupt energy giant. In the next several days, the most pointed questions confronting the administration may not be whether officials provided favored treatment for Enron as it slid toward ruin.
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