Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Government Agencies
IN THE NEWS

United States Government Agencies

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you walk into your neighborhood fish market or grocery store, the display case is filled with "fresh" swordfish, "fresh" salmon, "fresh" shrimp, "fresh" petrale sole. But then you take your catch home and find that your "fresh" filet has a frozen center. Or your fork finds mush instead of firm flesh. How long has your dinner been away from the ocean? And what has happened to it since it left the waves behind?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried that bioterrorists might strike next at the nation's food supplies, the Bush administration is reviving a controversial proposal to bring the government's patchwork of food safety agencies under one roof. Government food inspections are now scattered across about a dozen agencies, in sometimes bizarre ways. The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring the safety of cheese pizza, but the Agriculture Department takes over if there's a pepperoni topping.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ehud Tenenbaum was arrested on suspicion of hacking his way into Pentagon and other sensitive computer systems, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was openly admiring of the young Israeli, lauding his skills as "damn good." Netanyahu added that the 18-year-old was "dangerous too." But the Israeli prime minister's praise made an instant celebrity of a young man suspected of leading the most serious attack on the Pentagon's computers and breaking into as many as 700 sites worldwide.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
After a colony of anthrax bacteria was found growing in a mail bin at the Princeton, N.J., post office last month, the FBI and public health agencies couldn't settle on which group should take environmental swabs. So they both did. And the state's public health laboratory was forced to process two batches of samples to be reviewed by two agencies instead of one batch in a combined effort. "We used our samples to make public health decisions," explained Dr. George T. DiFerdinando Jr.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As do many HIV-positive people, Elena Monica does all she can to maintain her health and avoid the disease's symptoms. She sees a conventional medical doctor who checks her blood and advises her. But she also undergoes oxygen therapy, an unproven remedy that involves intramuscular injections of pure liquid oxygen. And she practices chiqong , a form of Chinese meditation.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | From Reuters
The super-secret National Security Agency, which eavesdrops on communication worldwide as part of U.S. spying operations, opened its doors Saturday to offer outsiders a rare glimpse of facilities that test antennas and print nuclear code books. About 16,500 employees and their families were expected at the first "family day" since 1996 held at NSA headquarters, about 25 miles outside Washington, as the spy agency makes a greater effort to inform Americans about its mission.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An aide to former Housing Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr. testified Monday that Pierce often awarded federal housing grants on the basis of friendship and political favoritism. The testimony of DuBois L.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After pumping $300 billion into computer systems in the last two decades, the federal government has compiled a record of failure that has jeopardized the nation's welfare, eroded public safety and squandered untold billions of dollars. While most of America is rushing headlong into 21st century information technology, much of the government is operating with computers designed and built when Studebaker was making cars.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | CHARLES J. HARTLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Education Department announced Tuesday that it is searching for a firm to assume billions of dollars in student guaranteed loans currently held by a financially beleaguered institution. Department officials confirmed at a press conference that the Higher Education Assistance Foundation, one of 55 nonprofit agencies that guarantee student loans given by banks and other lending institutions, is threatened by a high default rate.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
With actor Jimmy Stewart starring as a lobbyist, the House Appropriations Committee Thursday endorsed a controversial proposal to create a National Film Commission to designate great American motion pictures of the past and discourage "colorization" of classics photographed in black and white.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Custodio is sprawled on a blanket near the Hollywood Freeway, bundled up against the chill as daylight approaches. He is neither homeless nor unemployed, but a middle-class, Internet-savvy homeowner and naturalized U.S. citizen from El Salvador. "I left my homeland a long time ago, but now I feel like I'm back in the Third World," an exhausted Custodio says near the end of a 13-hour vigil waiting for the downtown Los Angeles Immigration and Naturalization Service headquarters to open.
NEWS
April 29, 2001
The Immigration and Naturalization Service district office in downtown Los Angeles will remain open until midnight Monday to accept residency applications on behalf of illegal immigrants who have close relatives or employees to sponsor them. Congress last year extended until April 30 a federal statute that allows eligible illegal immigrants to gain lawful status without leaving the country. Previously, such applications had to be filed from U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An environmental watchdog group jumped into the battle over development in the Santa Clarita Valley on Wednesday by threatening to sue federal agencies for allegedly failing to protect habitats of the California red-legged frog and the southwestern arroyo toad in the Santa Clara River basin and its tributaries. The Center for Biological Diversity asserted that the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
To help teenagers learn to "walk away from violence," the White House has set up a hotline and Web site offering tips on peacefully resolving disputes, President Clinton said Saturday. In his weekly radio address, broadcast one week before he leaves office, Clinton also promoted a new government guide aimed at improving communication between parents and their teenage children.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Clinton has signed an order creating a national counterintelligence executive to oversee the government's efforts to protect its most vital national security secrets, administration officials said Friday. The new executive will have a four-member board composed of the director of the FBI, the deputy secretary of Defense, the deputy director of the CIA and a Justice Department representative. White House spokesman Jake Siewert said Clinton took the action to help adapt U.S.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators say the TV networks should have named the Office of National Drug Control Policy as a sponsor of "ER" and other prime-time shows that included anti-drug messages paid for by the government. The ruling by the Federal Communications Commission found "no basis for enforcement action" and does not impose any fine.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The partial shutdown of the government continued for a fifth day Saturday despite a Republican effort to return some furloughed federal workers to their jobs and a Clinton Administration admonition to Congress to do everything possible to resolve the budget stalemate this weekend. "We are examining every possible opportunity we have to get people back to work on Monday . . . if I can find the legal way to get them back to work," Clinton said in an interview with NBC News.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, responding to pressures for better Pentagon management in the face of weapons procurement scandals, has proposed restructuring the U.S. military's top management to eliminate layers of bureaucracy and tighten control over weapons buying, according to documents obtained by the Washington Post.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
When he took over as head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1997, Kevin Gover's top goal was simply to make the agency competent at providing services to nearly 560 tribes. He commissioned a report by outside experts that found a "lack of credible management" so serious that the BIA often inadvertently broke the law. After nearly three years of working on reforms, Gover says the agency has improved but has not yet achieved basic competence in all areas. "We've got a ways to go.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aides for President-elect George W. Bush are sounding out Silicon Valley executives about convening a high-tech summit next month and musing over whether to appoint a government czar for technology. Influential but little-known Silicon Valley venture capitalist Floyd Kvamme and defeated Sen. Spencer Abraham (R-Mich.) have been mentioned as possible candidates for a tech czar post.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|