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United States Government Agencies Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that has outraged physicians, administrators at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in West Los Angeles on Wednesday began notifying 29 of its 211 doctors that they will lose their jobs by August as part of cutbacks at veterans hospitals nationwide.
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NEWS
June 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Republicans are divided over their plan to cut $389 million from the government's chief disaster response agency, even as Tropical Storm Allison finished tearing a path from Texas to New England. Republicans included the Federal Emergency Management Agency cut in a bill providing $6.5 billion for the rest of fiscal 2001 for defense, education and other programs that the House Appropriations Committee approved last week. The full House plans to debate the measure Wednesday.
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NEWS
August 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Defense Department intends to ask Congress to approve a $27-billion, six-year spending plan for the super-secret National Security Agency and two other intelligence groups, a trade publication reports. In a story published in this week's edition, Defense Week said it obtained internal Pentagon documents that spelled out the budget requests as approved by John M. Deutch, the deputy defense secretary.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | From The Washington Post
The U.S. Postal Service expects to lose $480 million and cut as many as 13,200 jobs in fiscal 2001, according to figures it released Tuesday. Postal officials suggested that the losses could be even greater because the $480-million figure does not reflect the rate increases recommended Monday by the independent Postal Rate Commission that were significantly lower than the increases the Postal Service requested.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping a steady march to a final budget confrontation with President Clinton, the Republican-controlled House approved a spending bill Thursday that would cut funding for all government agencies by 1%--a last-ditch austerity measure designed to help the GOP meet its much-vaunted goal of not tapping Social Security revenues for other uses. Far more was at stake in the bill--which would finance education, labor and health programs--than just one piece of the sprawling annual budget.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. government is spending $26.7 billion on intelligence activities this fiscal year, nearly the same as the $26.6 billion spent last year, CIA Director George J. Tenet said. It is only the second time since World War II that Washington has disclosed the cost of U.S. spying. The money is usually hidden in the Defense Department budget. The money finances the CIA and 12 other intelligence-gathering agencies.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Social Security system, says the conservative Heritage Foundation, is a bad bargain for just about every American of working age. And for no ethnic group does Social Security promise so meager a retirement package as for the nation's Latino population. The reason, say experts from Heritage and elsewhere: Latinos as a group are younger than the rest of the population. They bear a disproportionate share of the payroll tax burden, which supports today's retirees.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | From The Washington Post
The U.S. Postal Service expects to lose $480 million and cut as many as 13,200 jobs in fiscal 2001, according to figures it released Tuesday. Postal officials suggested that the losses could be even greater because the $480-million figure does not reflect the rate increases recommended Monday by the independent Postal Rate Commission that were significantly lower than the increases the Postal Service requested.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The military commanders of the Army Corps of Engineers have launched a behind-the-scenes campaign to boost the agency's $4-billion civil works budget by more than 50%, at a time when the Clinton administration is publicly questioning the agency's traditional agenda of major water projects. The Army Corps has been strongly criticized for wasteful and environmentally damaging construction, even by some of its own leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sadie Sanchez came clutching a brightly colored family photo album. Inside were pictures of her father, Francisco Sanchez, in his casket. The elder Sanchez, who was caught in a conveyor belt and crushed at a Wilmington refuse center in March, 1994, is one of about 57,000 workers who die or are injured on the job each year. Workers and union leaders came together Thursday in front of the Federal Building in Downtown Los Angeles to honor those workers.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
With a month left in the fiscal year, the Postal Service is facing its first money-losing performance since 1994. Postmaster General William Henderson said that the agency could be as much as $300 million in the red when the books are tallied at the end of September. Henderson said that there has been a decline in first-class cards and letters and that the agency has faced a series of unexpected costs.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The military commanders of the Army Corps of Engineers have launched a behind-the-scenes campaign to boost the agency's $4-billion civil works budget by more than 50%, at a time when the Clinton administration is publicly questioning the agency's traditional agenda of major water projects. The Army Corps has been strongly criticized for wasteful and environmentally damaging construction, even by some of its own leaders.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Office of Inspector General is auditing the Small Business Administration's minority-certification program to determine how nearly $22 million collected from other federal agencies was spent over the last two years. SBA officials declined to comment on the audit of the program, which has been plagued by a low response rate from the small businesses it targets. In the past, minority entrepreneurs contracting with federal agencies "self-certified" as disadvantaged by checking a box on a form.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping a steady march to a final budget confrontation with President Clinton, the Republican-controlled House approved a spending bill Thursday that would cut funding for all government agencies by 1%--a last-ditch austerity measure designed to help the GOP meet its much-vaunted goal of not tapping Social Security revenues for other uses. Far more was at stake in the bill--which would finance education, labor and health programs--than just one piece of the sprawling annual budget.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A proposed $1-billion cut in NASA's budget drew fire from members of Congress and scientists who warned in Washington that it would decimate the U.S. space agency. "Enacting these cuts is irresponsible and unacceptable," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.), whose state includes NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. NASA chief Daniel Goldin has said as many as three of the agency's regional centers would close if the budget cuts go through, with significant layoffs likely.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Reinventing government" is linked so closely to Vice President Al Gore that he often jokes its nickname, REGO, is "Gore spelled sideways." But a new report by the General Accounting Office obtained by The Times turns Gore's sweeping claims of transforming government upside-down. Although Gore says that the program has "saved the American people over $137 billion," the GAO report concludes that the National Partnership for Reinventing Government claims credit where credit is not due. Rep.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what White House officials fear is a Republican attack on Clinton Administration economic policies, a House panel voted Tuesday to eliminate the small but highly visible office that provides economic advice to the President. The House Appropriations Committee fought off a bid by Democrats to save the Council of Economic Advisers, and is expected to give final approval today to a spending measure that eliminates the council's proposed $3.4-million budget for next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1995 | TOM WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the fate of the National Endowment for the Arts threatened by fiscal conservatives such as House Speaker Newt Gingrich, many Los Angeles arts organizations place community outreach programs at the forefront of cuts that would result from reductions in NEA support. "We would inevitably have to cut those things that aren't income-producing," says Gordon Davidson, artistic director of the Center Theatre Group. "I'm dealing with tight corners these days."
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A string of embezzlements at military installations across the nation is pointing out serious weaknesses in the Pentagon's control over its multibillion-dollar contractor payment system, according to three investigative reports due to be released today. The embezzlements, ranging from $11,000 to $3 million each, were executed mainly by low-level employees at federal payment centers exploiting loopholes in the government's troubled accounting system, the reports found.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Social Security system, says the conservative Heritage Foundation, is a bad bargain for just about every American of working age. And for no ethnic group does Social Security promise so meager a retirement package as for the nation's Latino population. The reason, say experts from Heritage and elsewhere: Latinos as a group are younger than the rest of the population. They bear a disproportionate share of the payroll tax burden, which supports today's retirees.
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