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NEWS
October 3, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snooping abroad for clues to illicit plots is one of the CIA's primary missions, but the agency disclosed Friday that it had discovered a criminal operation embarrassingly close to home. Joseph P. Romello, 41, an upper-management CIA veteran of 12 years, pleaded guilty Friday to charges that he conspired to defraud the agency and the U.S. government of about $1.2 million, the Justice Department and the CIA announced. Acting on an anonymous tip to CIA Inspector General Frederick P.
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NEWS
July 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A key House panel overturned President Bush's proposal to eliminate contraceptive coverage for federal employees, virtually ensuring that the benefit provided to 1.2 million women in the government work force since 1998 will remain.
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NEWS
December 16, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he drives through South Los Angeles on an overcast afternoon, Special Agent John Pi of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is having trouble--as usual--making up his mind. Pi, who in sunglasses looks far younger than 36, has an organized-crime case to work. But the call over a bureau radio is clear: The SWAT team is about to enter a house where it believes kidnappers are keeping a 3-year-old taken from a San Marino family two weeks earlier. The address is only five minutes away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former Immigration and Naturalization Service official was sentenced to a year in prison and fined $2,400 for accepting bribes from two men who were previously found innocent of the charges. Angel Orduno, 51, pleaded guilty and cooperated in the prosecution of two former Fresno men on charges that they bribed him in exchange for expediting a series of U.S. citizenship applications. However, last month a federal jury acquitted Jamal Bibi, 43, and Jassim Mohammad Addal, 35.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By 2 p.m. Tuesday, security officer Nick McGahuey felt like he had been summoned to keep the peace in a ghost town. The Chet Holifield Federal Building on Avila Road here, known to locals as the Ziggurat building, was eerily deserted. Looking for tax advice at the Internal Revenue Service? "Outta luck," as McGahuey put it. "The doors are locked up tighter than a drum." Those hoping for help in obtaining Social Security checks would find three employees out of 21 on duty at a solitary window.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | BETTY CUNIBERTI and GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writers
Donald Rochon took a $7,000 pay cut when he left the Los Angeles Police Department in 1981 to fulfill a dream: joining what he considered to be the nation's premier law enforcement agency, the FBI. The only son of a white contractor and a black housewife, Rochon had grown up surfing and socializing almost exclusively with white friends on Los Angeles beaches. But after three years with the FBI in Chicago and Omaha, he found himself in the midst of a racial nightmare.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The FBI announced Saturday that a veteran agent in its New York office, who served as director of a suburban soccer program for youngsters in his spare time, had been arrested on charges of child molestation. A complaint filed in federal court in Brooklyn charged Richard M. Taus, a 10-year bureau veteran, with transporting a minor in interstate commerce for the purpose of prostitution, threatening a witness and misusing government property.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expressing frustration over the federal government shutdown and the strain on furloughed workers, about 100 government employees Tuesday staged a "work-in" at a Baltimore Social Security Administration office. Chanting slogans--"Congress, we want to work!"--the American Federation of Government Employees Local 1923 reversed the normal bargaining practice of withholding labor by urging its members to report to their jobs.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writers
In a dramatic attempt to put a major controversy behind him, embattled Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. Dan Quayle told the Veterans of Foreign Wars Monday night that "absolutely no influence" was used to get him into the Indiana National Guard in 1969 as the Vietnam War was raging. "My unit had vacancies before I applied, when I applied and after I applied. There was no influence whatsoever," Quayle said. "You more than any other group of Americans need to know the facts."
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Penthouse magazine says it will pay former White House secretary Fawn Hall $500,000 to pose nude. Playboy magazine wants her for a "celebrity pictorial." Her friends say she is also receiving television, film and modeling offers. So far, they say, she is not interested. "She thought the (Penthouse) offer was disgusting," said F. Andrew Messing Jr., a conservative activist and friend of Hall's. Hall, former secretary to fired National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell urged newspaper publishers Friday to tell the story of U.S. diplomats and the work they do so Americans will support a foreign policy that "has us engaged" in the world. Powell said that one of his major missions will be to fight for better salaries, more secure embassies and more recognition for the men and women who work for the State Department.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A spy dispute between Russia and the United States played out Friday, with officials here moving to eject four American diplomats and pledging to oust more later to replicate steps taken this week by Washington. Afterward, U.S. officials said they considered the matter closed, signaling that they did not anticipate a second round of expulsions. And senior officials of both countries said relations on other issues need not suffer. Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week, Ian Thomas posted a map on a U.S. government Web site of the caribou calving areas in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, an area the Bush administration wants to open up for oil exploration. This week, Thomas is looking for a new job. "I'm really flabbergasted," Thomas said Wednesday. "After putting out 20,000 maps with no problem and then putting out one where baby caribou like to hang out, I got fired." Thomas, a contract employee for the U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Near the end, Robert Philip Hanssen descended into a madness of his own making. Caution gone, he prowled the darkness of a neighborhood park with a penlight searching for a signal that wasn't there. A lumbering figure, he waved his arms and seemed to shout at the sky. "I have come about as close as I ever want to come to sacrificing myself to help you and I get silence. I hate silence," he had complained a few months earlier when communications with his Russian handlers had lapsed.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former FBI and CIA chief William H. Webster said Wednesday that he plans to examine whether the FBI--long reluctant to require periodic polygraph testing of its agents--should use polygraphs more aggressively to ferret out possible spies. Webster, who will assess the fallout from one of the biggest cases of suspected espionage in recent U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if out of nowhere, on a fall day 15 years ago, came a letter to a Soviet KGB agent. The writer, identifying himself simply as "B," was promising to send a box of documents from "the most sensitive and highly compartmented projects of the U.S. intelligence community." For his services, "B" wanted $100,000. Thus began, according to his supervisors, the eventual undoing of FBI Agent Robert Philip Hanssen.
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A retired Army intelligence analyst was charged Tuesday with selling the Soviet KGB top secret documents from 1988 to 1991, including sites targeted for tactical nuclear attack if the former Soviet Union struck the United States first. David Sheldon Boone, 46, who was assigned to the National Security Agency, allegedly walked into the Soviet embassy here and volunteered his services to Moscow, delivering his first classified document for $300.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today, as the spacecraft Galileo swoops past Jupiter's volcano-ridden moon Io collecting images and scientific data, few will be as mesmerized by the close encounter as La Verne resident Eileen Clark. The 49-year-old space buff is a mission operations analyst at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. She trouble-shoots the Galileo project, anticipating problems before they occur. Clark loves her job. In fact, she'd be thrilled to remain at JPL for years to come.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
* George Trofimoff, a retired Army Reserve colonel, was arrested in Florida and charged last year with spying for the former Soviet Union and Russia for 25 years. He is the highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever charged with espionage. A civilian worker in Army intelligence in Germany, he allegedly was recruited into the KGB in 1969. He is accused of photographing U.S. documents and passed the film to KGB agents, and was later recruited into the KGB.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she does each day, 13-year-old Hadley Greene planned to cut through her best friend's backyard Tuesday to get to her own home in this quiet Washington suburb. This time, however, it was surrounded by yellow police tape marking the scene of an investigation--one that the nation's top law enforcement officials say is uncovering one of the "most traitorous actions imaginable."
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