Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Government Employees Labor Relations
IN THE NEWS

United States Government Employees Labor Relations

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | KENNETH J. COOPER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Responding to political pressure from radio talk-show hosts, Ross Perot supporters and freshman lawmakers, the House on Wednesday approved bipartisan legislation that would give employees of Congress the same rights under labor laws as workers in the private sector.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | KENNETH J. COOPER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Responding to political pressure from radio talk-show hosts, Ross Perot supporters and freshman lawmakers, the House on Wednesday approved bipartisan legislation that would give employees of Congress the same rights under labor laws as workers in the private sector.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton told a group of state and local government employees that, if elected, he would "never bash government workers" but would challenge them to work more efficiently, "not as your enemy, but as your partner."
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture meant to signify the end of 12 years of hostility between government and organized labor, President Clinton on Thursday lifted the ban on hiring air traffic controllers fired by President Ronald Reagan when they joined an illegal strike. The long-anticipated announcement enabled Clinton to keep a campaign pledge by overturning the controversial 1981 action, which heralded a more confrontational era between unions and government under Presidents Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge has temporarily blocked portions of the Navy's mandatory drug-testing plan for civilian employees, but he let stand forced testing for pilots and others who work in public-safety jobs. U.S. District Judge Lowell D. Jensen issued the orders as part of a lawsuit filed by unions and groups representing about 300,000 civilian Navy workers around the world. They are challenging the Navy's "Drug-Free Workplace Program" as an infringement on their constitutional rights.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department is seeking a private firm to run a major anti-drug program and to coordinate federal attempts to curb juvenile crime, a move that "defies common sense," a government union charged Thursday. Under the proposal, the department would replace 48 government employees in the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention by signing a contract with a private firm to do their work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | BOB BAKER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Excuse Sandy Denny, the office supervisor at the Social Security Administration office in Huntington Beach, if she yawned at work Tuesday. She had stayed up late Monday night to watch a broadcast about the fate of the federal budget--and the fate of her job. As it turned out, President Bush and Congress agreed on a temporary funding bill early Tuesday to end a three-day federal government shutdown.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Federal employees lost their bid Friday to block enforcement of a new ethics law while they challenge its ban on outside income for articles and speeches. The workers' 1st Amendment right to freedom of speech will not be harmed by leaving the law in effect until a lower court decides its constitutionality, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said.
NEWS
November 6, 1988
A federal judge in San Francisco struck down the Reagan Administration's plan for a random drug-testing program for the nation's 3,800 National Weather Service meteorologists. U.S. District Court Judge Robert Schnacke said the testing plan was overly broad and violated the Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
October 19, 1988
The Justice Department asked the federal appeals court in Washington to uphold random urine testing of Transportation Department and civilian Army employees, saying it is crucial to help the government combat the "crisis" of illegal drug use. But a lawyer for the employees urged the court to find that the testing is unreasonable and that there was no evidence of widespread drug problems among government workers. The Transportation Department testing was upheld last year by a lower court judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
A Jewish postal worker won his fight to wear a skullcap uncovered while delivering mail when the federal Equal Opportunity Employment Commission ruled in his favor. "I think I've struck a blow for religious freedom," postal carrier Howard Singer said of the decision, which was based on civil rights laws that prohibit religious discrimination. The federal agency's decision, which took effect Monday, also could affect other postal employees who want to wear religious garments because the U.S.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton told a group of state and local government employees that, if elected, he would "never bash government workers" but would challenge them to work more efficiently, "not as your enemy, but as your partner."
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Federal employees lost their bid Friday to block enforcement of a new ethics law while they challenge its ban on outside income for articles and speeches. The workers' 1st Amendment right to freedom of speech will not be harmed by leaving the law in effect until a lower court decides its constitutionality, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | BOB BAKER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Excuse Sandy Denny, the office supervisor at the Social Security Administration office in Huntington Beach, if she yawned at work Tuesday. She had stayed up late Monday night to watch a broadcast about the fate of the federal budget--and the fate of her job. As it turned out, President Bush and Congress agreed on a temporary funding bill early Tuesday to end a three-day federal government shutdown.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge has temporarily blocked portions of the Navy's mandatory drug-testing plan for civilian employees, but he let stand forced testing for pilots and others who work in public-safety jobs. U.S. District Judge Lowell D. Jensen issued the orders as part of a lawsuit filed by unions and groups representing about 300,000 civilian Navy workers around the world. They are challenging the Navy's "Drug-Free Workplace Program" as an infringement on their constitutional rights.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department is seeking a private firm to run a major anti-drug program and to coordinate federal attempts to curb juvenile crime, a move that "defies common sense," a government union charged Thursday. Under the proposal, the department would replace 48 government employees in the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention by signing a contract with a private firm to do their work.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | United Press International
A federal judge has bowed to his conscience--and a public outcry--and halted a work slowdown he used to protest Congress' refusal to give him a 50% pay raise. "I didn't sleep too well as it began to dawn on me that I was going after the wrong people," said U.S. District Judge Carl B. Rubin, who ended his slowdown Monday. "Maybe I was letting my anger affect my judgment. "I was getting bothered," he said. "When you're having an argument with yourself and you keep losing, that tells you something.
NEWS
August 7, 1989
The government is being urged to "aggressively implement" drug-testing of hundreds of thousands of federal employees as national drug-policy director William J. Bennett apparently reverses an earlier stand, the Washington Post reported.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|