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United States Government Employees Layoffs

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NEWS
January 7, 1996 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With his surprise move to endorse a Senate Democratic plan for balancing the federal budget in seven years, President Clinton sought Saturday to show that he is serious about reaching that touchstone goal--and, at the same time, to cement his success in seizing the upper hand from the Republicans who control both houses of Congress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996 | MARY MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When government employees returned to work at the Federal Building in Westwood Monday morning, they were greeted by a crowd of anxious people who had lined up before dawn for the passport office to open. By 8 a.m., the line was wrapped around the building, and it took people as long as five hours to get into the passport office and finish their business.
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NEWS
December 31, 1995 | JANET HOOK and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the partial shutdown of the federal government entered its third week, the House approved a bill Saturday that would return 280,000 federal workers to their jobs while Congress and the White House continue wrangling over a plan to balance the budget.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With his surprise move to endorse a Senate Democratic plan for balancing the federal budget in seven years, President Clinton sought Saturday to show that he is serious about reaching that touchstone goal--and, at the same time, to cement his success in seizing the upper hand from the Republicans who control both houses of Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at the Immigration and Naturalization Service on Thursday announced an agencywide cost-cutting proposal that could mean the loss of 115 administrative jobs at the offices in Laguna Niguel. The reorganization proposal, which wouldn't affect the agency's Border Patrol duties, would shift the local center's personnel, payroll and finance duties to INS centers in other regions of the country.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | BOB ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite widespread assurances that Social Security would be exempt from the automatic government budget cuts threatened for Oct. 1, those cuts would delay the processing of benefit claims and cause a "drastic falloff of service" to the nation's 40 million Social Security beneficiaries, a confidential agency memorandum says. The Social Security Administration would be forced to furlough its employees for as much as 85 days during the year to achieve the savings of $1.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS and JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the bowels of the federal bureaucracy, the worker bees have heard it all before: threats by politicians to dismantle hosts of federal programs and slash the size of the government's work force. President Ronald Reagan promised to do it. So did President Jimmy Carter before him. Even President Clinton made such noises. But none was able to take much more than a nick out of the federal monolith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN
The Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda is offering free admission and gift shop discounts to federal employees furloughed by the federal government shutdown. "We figured all those people are home," said Evie Lazzarino, a library spokeswoman. "Why not encourage them to come here?" The private facility is the only one of the nation's presidential libraries to remain open during the budget crisis, Lazzarino said. Libraries dedicated to former Presidents Herbert C. Hoover, Lyndon B.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday ordered thousands of furloughed government employees back to work next week to limit the disruption caused by the partial federal shutdown, even as he vowed to veto GOP-sponsored legislation that would provide stopgap funds to resume all suspended operations.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | JANET HOOK and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the partial shutdown of the federal government entered its third week, the House approved a bill Saturday that would return 280,000 federal workers to their jobs while Congress and the White House continue wrangling over a plan to balance the budget.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifteen days ago, Gunter Thomas, a medical technician who operates lasers at the National Cancer Institute, was deemed a "nonessential" federal employee and was furloughed in the government's partial shutdown. But unless he's permitted to return to work this week, a cancer patient scheduled for experimental laser surgery could go untreated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN
The Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda is offering free admission and gift shop discounts to federal employees furloughed by the federal government shutdown. "We figured all those people are home," said Evie Lazzarino, a library spokeswoman. "Why not encourage them to come here?" The private facility is the only one of the nation's presidential libraries to remain open during the budget crisis, Lazzarino said. Libraries dedicated to former Presidents Herbert C. Hoover, Lyndon B.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday ordered thousands of furloughed government employees back to work next week to limit the disruption caused by the partial federal shutdown, even as he vowed to veto GOP-sponsored legislation that would provide stopgap funds to resume all suspended operations.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-six of 500 scientists fired last month by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of wide government cutbacks are appealing their terminations, saying that the USGS illegally conspired to get rid of whistle-blowers, independent-minded staff and older employees. The appeals to the U.S.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Job-security jitters, a chronic condition for middle managers in private business for many years, have finally come to those most traditionally secure of all workers--federal bureaucrats. It could be months before federal workers in outposts such as this one feel the impact of the budget cuts being legislated in Washington. But in the meantime, the possibility of pay cuts and even layoffs has thrown bureaucrats here into a swirl of emotions ranging from resignation to denial.
NEWS
September 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of two major federal employee unions faulted the Clinton Administration's proposed cut of 252,000 government jobs over the next five years, saying the Administration was too optimistic that the reduction could be made without hurting programs and services.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
The Justice Department, in an effort to cut expenses, fired 21 employees Tuesday from its public affairs and legislative affairs staffs. Of the 11 people laid off from the public affairs office, six are spokesmen, including two with more than 20 years of service. Three of the four spokesmen who will be on the payroll after the cuts take effect Feb. 10 will be political appointees. "It was like a bomb went off," said one fired spokesman, Brad Marman. "Stone shock."
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS and JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the bowels of the federal bureaucracy, the worker bees have heard it all before: threats by politicians to dismantle hosts of federal programs and slash the size of the government's work force. President Ronald Reagan promised to do it. So did President Jimmy Carter before him. Even President Clinton made such noises. But none was able to take much more than a nick out of the federal monolith.
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