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United States Government Employees Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
December 7, 1987 | United Press International
Hostages in the 12-day takeover at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary will get $1,000 bonuses, extra pay and vacations, officials said, while the total cost of two Cuban uprisings was put at tens of millions of dollars. Abdul-Saboor Rushdan, a guard who was one of four hostages released Dec.
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NEWS
November 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Salaries for college-educated employees of House of Representatives offices lag well behind national averages, the result of a tight labor market in which the private sector can pay more, a study finds. But women and minorities who work for House members are doing better in pay equity when compared with employees in the general workplace, reports a nonprofit organization seeking to improve the effectiveness of Congress.
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NEWS
October 10, 1998 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Tripp, who instigated the Monica S. Lewinsky investigation, got hefty pay raises and outstanding performance evaluations in her job at the Pentagon even though her government supervisors considered her a problem employee, recently released records show.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government is raising salaries by as much as 33% for thousands of technology workers in an effort to better compete with private companies for such employees. The raises, which take effect Jan. 1, are aimed at hiring and retaining younger information technology workers and are tailored to pay competitively in the nation's high-tech corridors. For example, workers in San Francisco would make $3,000 to $7,000 more annually than their counterparts in St. Louis or Pittsburgh.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government is raising salaries by as much as 33% for thousands of technology workers in an effort to better compete with private companies for such employees. The raises, which take effect Jan. 1, are aimed at hiring and retaining younger information technology workers and are tailored to pay competitively in the nation's high-tech corridors. For example, workers in San Francisco would make $3,000 to $7,000 more annually than their counterparts in St. Louis or Pittsburgh.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | Associated Press
A federal judge struck down part of a sweeping ethics law Thursday, saying it unconstitutionally barred federal workers from accepting payment for outside speeches and articles. But he left intact other provisions that restrict honorariums for members of Congress. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson agreed that the section of law aimed at executive branch employees violated their First Amendment right to free speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992
The Federal Aviation Administration has rejected appeals from air traffic controllers at Van Nuys Airport, the nation's busiest general aviation airfield, to increase salaries and staffing in the control tower there. The request by the Van Nuys chapter of the National Air Traffic Controllers Assn. sought higher salaries for controllers to attract more experienced personnel to handle the airport's high traffic volume.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | The Washington Post
An airline charter executive brought into the White House travel office on a volunteer basis when career officials were fired two weeks ago received a $1,400 commission for the first flight she arranged. Penny Sample, president of Air Advantage of Albuquerque, N.M., returned the commission Tuesday after the White House was asked about it, White House senior adviser George Stephanopoulos said. "It was a mistake. She did not realize the funds were going to her firm."
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy suspended employee awards within his department, saying 42 separate bonus programs had cost the USDA $35 million last year and exposed it to "ridicule." The bonuses ranged from $250 "spot awards," given with minimal documentation, to payments of $10,000 or more to senior executives. Just administering the awards programs for the department's 110,000 workers cost $2.1 million over the last two years, Espy said.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | Associated Press
At least five Cabinet secretaries in the George Bush Administration authorized tens of thousands of dollars in bonuses for senior employees in the closing months of their tenures. Five minutes before Bill Clinton took the oath of office last month, departing Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. proposed cash bonuses for 12 senior career officials in his department. Calling that timing "outrageous," new Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt said Wednesday that he will review the bonuses.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | Reuters
Vice President Al Gore on Thursday called for an overhaul of the federal Civil Service system that would allow an individual's pay to be tied to job performance. "If we want our government to be accountable for every taxpayer's dime, then we need a work force that will be held accountable for real results," Gore said to an international conference on revising government. Gore said that under a plan the administration was about to propose, the goal would be to "pay for performance.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Tripp, who instigated the Monica S. Lewinsky investigation, got hefty pay raises and outstanding performance evaluations in her job at the Pentagon even though her government supervisors considered her a problem employee, recently released records show.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton has approved an average 3.6% pay raise for federal workers next year and proposed a 4.4% hike the following year that if implemented would represent the largest wage increase for the nation's 1.8 million civil servants in nearly two decades, administration officials said. For the typical white-collar federal worker nationally, who earns $44,814, the 3.6% increase will amount to an extra $1,613 in 1999. The 3.6% pay hike takes effect Jan. 1, while the 4.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Reserve, renowned for its tightfisted control of the nation's money supply, is considerably more generous to its own staff: It has more than doubled the number of executives who earn more than $125,000 in just the last three years, a congressional study shows. The Fed's director of support services, for example, whose job is to oversee janitors and guards, earns more than the secretary of defense, according to a study by the House Banking Committee released Wednesday.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A friend of Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary, who was hired in a newly created job as department ombudsman, must reimburse the government for more than $20,000 in living allowances that she was not entitled to receive, Energy Department officials said Thursday. E.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
For thousands of federal workers like Chuck Job, 1996 is beginning with partial paychecks and frustration over a budget impasse that may force them to pay bills with their savings. Job, a specialist in protecting water supplies, said he is disheartened, not only by his financial dilemma but by views of some lawmakers that furloughed workers aren't even missed.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Although their colleagues would get only a 3.5% raise next year, federal workers in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York City would receive an 8% pay hike under President Bush's budget proposal. The proposal would be a first step toward revamping the government's salary policy to recognize the vast differences in the cost of living in various parts of the country. Currently, the pay for most federal jobs does not vary between expensive cities and inexpensive rural areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | BOB BAKER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Excuse Sandy Denny, the office supervisor at the Social Security Administration office in Huntington Beach, if she yawned at work Tuesday. She had stayed up late Monday night to watch a broadcast about the fate of the federal budget--and the fate of her job. As it turned out, President Bush and Congress agreed on a temporary funding bill early Tuesday to end a three-day federal government shutdown.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a deer frozen in headlights, Sally Imura saw the federal government shutdown coming as far back as last summer, but she was unable to protect herself from the impending doom. "Heck no! I couldn't save anything because of my living expenses," said Imura, who earns more than $50,000 annually as a registered nurse in the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Long Beach. "I'm like most Americans. I live from paycheck to paycheck."
NEWS
December 28, 1995 | STEPHEN BARR, THE WASHINGTON POST
Federal employees, jolted by the increasing likelihood they will receive only partial pay next week, lashed out at their agencies and lawmakers Wednesday, and many worried they would not be able to make mortgage and car payments on time. Doris Johnson, a 29-year Labor Department employee at home in Greenbelt, Md., on furlough, called the prospect of partial pay "ridiculous" and faulted Congress for the budget impasse. "They are getting a full paycheck. They are playing games with people.
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