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NEWS
June 5, 1995 | from the Washington Post
The principal CIA employees in a threatened class-action lawsuit alleging sexual discrimination have asked a federal judge to find that a nearly $1-million tentative settlement wrested from the CIA in March is inadequate. The unusual revolt by at least nine of the 10 female CIA operatives who threatened to sue is a political setback for the CIA's top management, which had sought through the settlement to put behind it the charges of rampant sexism in CIA stations overseas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Before Janet Reno, there was Mabel Walker Willebrandt, the highest-ranking woman in federal government in her day and indisputably the most controversial. As assistant attorney general for seven demanding years, she enforced one of America's most despised laws--the 18th Amendment, Prohibition--which tried to render the country "dry" and earned this woman enforcer the stinging nickname "Prohibition Portia."
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NEWS
June 10, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge quashed a rebellion by at least 10 former and current covert CIA female operatives Friday and forced them to accept a settlement of their class-action sexual discrimination lawsuit against the Central Intelligence Agency. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Albert Bryan here was a victory for the agency.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge quashed a rebellion by at least 10 former and current covert CIA female operatives Friday and forced them to accept a settlement of their class-action sexual discrimination lawsuit against the Central Intelligence Agency. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Albert Bryan here was a victory for the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Before Janet Reno, there was Mabel Walker Willebrandt, the highest-ranking woman in federal government in her day and indisputably the most controversial. As assistant attorney general for seven demanding years, she enforced one of America's most despised laws--the 18th Amendment, Prohibition--which tried to render the country "dry" and earned this woman enforcer the stinging nickname "Prohibition Portia."
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | from the Washington Post
The principal CIA employees in a threatened class-action lawsuit alleging sexual discrimination have asked a federal judge to find that a nearly $1-million tentative settlement wrested from the CIA in March is inadequate. The unusual revolt by at least nine of the 10 female CIA operatives who threatened to sue is a political setback for the CIA's top management, which had sought through the settlement to put behind it the charges of rampant sexism in CIA stations overseas.
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