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NEWS
September 8, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Welfare reform has generated a $4.7-billion windfall for the states, handing governors an unexpected pile of cash that some have begun to divert to new priorities, such as education and tax relief, and others have stored for rainy days, according to a federal study. The money results from the swift, steep declines in the nation's public assistance rolls since the reforms took effect two years ago.
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | Associated Press
His opinion on national priorities may soon be worth less than "half a soda pop," President Clinton said, but he nonetheless offered a low-key rebuttal Monday to Republican tax cut and spending plans that would far outlast his presidency. "I think we've got to keep the economy going by hewing to the same principles of fiscal discipline that got us where we are," a nostalgic Clinton told the National Governors' Assn., which he once chaired.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Treasury Department will pay bills using an experimental Internet payment system developed by a group of North American banks, according to BankBoston Corp., which is expected to announce the test today. BankBoston and NationsBank Corp., members of the Financial Services Technology Consortium, will unveil plans for a test involving the Treasury, the Defense Department and 50 military contractors starting by the end of the year.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Welfare reform has generated a $4.7-billion windfall for the states, handing governors an unexpected pile of cash that some have begun to divert to new priorities, such as education and tax relief, and others have stored for rainy days, according to a federal study. The money results from the swift, steep declines in the nation's public assistance rolls since the reforms took effect two years ago.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | Associated Press
The House approved a stopgap bill Monday to keep the government running through Oct. 23, in a debate that lacked the partisan combat that marked the end of the last two fiscal years. The measure, approved 355 to 57, lets government agencies operate temporarily beginning Wednesday, when fiscal 1998 begins. It is needed because, so far, Congress has sent President Clinton just three of the 13 annual bills required to keep federal employees at work.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials Friday began hasty preparations for shutting down most operations on Tuesday in the face of a congressional-White House impasse over legislation to keep the government running. Agencies prepared to furlough more than 800,000 of the government's 1.2 million non-military workers, including up to 2,000 in Orange County.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Citizen anger is appropriate. Because the U.S. government is threatened with closure on Tuesday--although the Treasury almost certainly won't default on its bonds--the game of chicken the White House and Congress are playing over the federal budget could still end up costing taxpayers $40 billion. That's $160 more in taxes for every American, the penalty the United States may have to pay in added interest if its credit rating is damaged by temporary default on U.S.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Citing the attachment of unrelated provisions, President Clinton has vowed to veto legislation that would raise the federal debt ceiling and a second bill, expected Monday, that would provide temporary funding to keep the government running until a final budget plan is passed. The veto threat is raising the chances of a government shutdown and a technically bankrupt Treasury. IF A SHUTDOWN OCCURS: * Most government offices would be closed.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | Associated Press
His opinion on national priorities may soon be worth less than "half a soda pop," President Clinton said, but he nonetheless offered a low-key rebuttal Monday to Republican tax cut and spending plans that would far outlast his presidency. "I think we've got to keep the economy going by hewing to the same principles of fiscal discipline that got us where we are," a nostalgic Clinton told the National Governors' Assn., which he once chaired.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the federal government shuts down Monday at midnight, a massive ripple effect will strike California, sending thousands of federal employees home from work and freezing myriad public services that help make up the fabric of everyday life. The mail will go through--because the Postal Service no longer depends on appropriated funds--and Social Security checks will be processed.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Treasury Department will pay bills using an experimental Internet payment system developed by a group of North American banks, according to BankBoston Corp., which is expected to announce the test today. BankBoston and NationsBank Corp., members of the Financial Services Technology Consortium, will unveil plans for a test involving the Treasury, the Defense Department and 50 military contractors starting by the end of the year.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | Associated Press
The House approved a stopgap bill Monday to keep the government running through Oct. 23, in a debate that lacked the partisan combat that marked the end of the last two fiscal years. The measure, approved 355 to 57, lets government agencies operate temporarily beginning Wednesday, when fiscal 1998 begins. It is needed because, so far, Congress has sent President Clinton just three of the 13 annual bills required to keep federal employees at work.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Citizen anger is appropriate. Because the U.S. government is threatened with closure on Tuesday--although the Treasury almost certainly won't default on its bonds--the game of chicken the White House and Congress are playing over the federal budget could still end up costing taxpayers $40 billion. That's $160 more in taxes for every American, the penalty the United States may have to pay in added interest if its credit rating is damaged by temporary default on U.S.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials Friday began hasty preparations for shutting down most operations on Tuesday in the face of a congressional-White House impasse over legislation to keep the government running. Agencies prepared to furlough more than 800,000 of the government's 1.2 million non-military workers, including up to 2,000 in Orange County.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Citing the attachment of unrelated provisions, President Clinton has vowed to veto legislation that would raise the federal debt ceiling and a second bill, expected Monday, that would provide temporary funding to keep the government running until a final budget plan is passed. The veto threat is raising the chances of a government shutdown and a technically bankrupt Treasury. IF A SHUTDOWN OCCURS: * Most government offices would be closed.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the federal government shuts down Monday at midnight, a massive ripple effect will strike California, sending thousands of federal employees home from work and freezing myriad public services that help make up the fabric of everyday life. The mail will go through--because the Postal Service no longer depends on appropriated funds--and Social Security checks will be processed.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | Associated Press
Squabbles between Congress and the President have disrupted federal spending authority nine times since 1981, but workers were sent home only four times. Only one shutdown lasted more than a day, and it fell on a holiday weekend. * November, 1981: President Ronald Reagan vetoed an emergency money bill, sending about 400,000 employees home at midday. Congress rushed him a new version of the bill 10 hours later, and workers returned to their jobs the next day.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | Associated Press
Squabbles between Congress and the President have disrupted federal spending authority nine times since 1981, but workers were sent home only four times. Only one shutdown lasted more than a day, and it fell on a holiday weekend. * November, 1981: President Ronald Reagan vetoed an emergency money bill, sending about 400,000 employees home at midday. Congress rushed him a new version of the bill 10 hours later, and workers returned to their jobs the next day.
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