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NEWS
July 18, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Bill L. Walters, who told a congressional committee in June that he was broke after defaulting on nearly $100 million in loans obtained from a Denver thrift with the help of Neil Bush, is now living in the lap of luxury here. In February, a trust for Walters' wife, Jacqueline, bought a $1.9-million gated estate near Newport Bay, according to county records reviewed by The Times.
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NEWS
March 23, 2002 | The Washington Post
Army Secretary Thomas E. White and his wife flew to Colorado on an Army jet this month and closed on the sale of their Aspen house, according to Army officials and sources in Colorado. Army spokesman Larry Gottardi acknowledged that the Whites made the Aspen trip while the Army secretary was traveling on business to Seattle. He declined to explain the official purpose of the Seattle trip or what Army business White had in Aspen.
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NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA director R. James Woolsey, under fire for months for his handling of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case and lacking strong support in the White House and Congress, resigned abruptly on Wednesday. The nation's first post-Cold War spy chief never forcefully seized control of a sprawling, $30-billion-a-year intelligence bureaucracy and was not seen by his own employees or by his overseers on Capitol Hill as a strong advocate of intelligence programs.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Responding to escalating violence, President Bush on Thursday suddenly stepped up the administration's involvement in the Middle East, announcing that he was dispatching his special envoy back to the region. The president had said he would not send retired Marine Corps Gen. Anthony C. Zinni on a renewed mission while Israel and the Palestinian territories were racked with violence.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK and TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The $500 billion has vanished down a hole in the front yard, gone under the fine, green lawn that is bordered by a white picket fence, lost into that benign part of the American dream known as owning a home of your own. That was what savings and loan companies were for, to help the home buyer fulfill the dream. For years, they did. Then the S&Ls began to "crater," to use a favorite industry term. Good money chased bad down the maw. In the midst of it, the Pinocchios and Magoos of the U.S.
MAGAZINE
April 11, 1993 | TOM BATES, Portland-based Tom Bates, a former senior editor of this magazine, last wrote about the Spanish priest Bartolome de las Casas.
THERE ARE TIMES WHEN A PANTY GIRDLE can be a girl's best friend. For Julie Williamson, the moment came one afternoon in 1969, not long after the smart, ambitious, 29-year-old legal secretary had gone to work for Bob Packwood in the freshman senator's Portland office. She was alone talking on the telephone when her 36-year-old employer strode in and kissed her on the back of the neck.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling up the Capitol steps to dramatize the barriers confronting them, scores of disabled persons rallied Monday to protest delays in congressional action on a Senate-passed bill to expand their access to jobs, transportation and public services. The legislation, endorsed by President Bush, has broad bipartisan backing but has been moving at glacial speed through four House committees since it was approved overwhelmingly by the Senate last September.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William J. Bennett, the first director of the nation's war on drugs, went out with a bang Thursday, calling one congressional critic "a gas bag" and labeling the drug-plagued District of Columbia "a basket case." President Bush, in accepting Bennett's resignation at the White House, praised his leadership in the war against drugs and said that the nation "is on the road to victory" in that war.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.) was seized by Senate police in the wee hours of Wednesday morning and carried into the Senate to answer a quorum call, but he was in good humor after the incident, joking: "I rather enjoyed it. I instructed four of my staff to get a sedan chair." Other Republicans, however, bridled at the arrest, which took place as Democratic and Republican lawmakers staged a lengthy fight over legislation that would limit spending on congressional elections. Sen. Orrin G.
MAGAZINE
September 30, 1990 | Maura Dolan
A chain of low hills began to rise. Moving plates beneath the earth's crust pushed them skyward. They climbed imperceptibly at first, fractions of an inch over centuries. On the western flank of the central range, a river accelerated into a torrent. The crashing water cut a narrow, V-shaped canyon out of the granite. Twenty-three million years passed. An icecap enshrouded the summit of the range. Tongues of ice streamed down into the canyon. The ice thickened.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert C. Bonner had not even moved into his new office as head of the U.S. Customs Service when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks turned the routine task of border control into an urgent national priority and changed his job forever. The north tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on the Customs Service's largest office complex outside of Washington, destroying the eight-story building. (All 790 employees got out safely.) Customs inspectors, meanwhile, were urgently needed at the U.S.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A movie theater on Connecticut Avenue this week took on the jarring flavor of a combined Hollywood premiere and military officers' bash. Cinema heartthrobs in T-shirts and leather jackets huddled with muscle-bound Delta Force and Ranger vets. The seats held more brass than the Glenn Miller Orchestra: Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Army Secretary Thomas E. White Jr.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His father was an Austrian Jew who escaped the Nazi Holocaust by fleeing to Cuba. His mother was a Catholic Cuban who escaped Havana after Fidel Castro came to power. Their son, Otto Juan Reich, came to America at 14 with a personal and passionate distrust of dictatorships.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like his father, conservative Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Eugene Scalia prompts a strong reaction. In the eyes of labor groups and occupational safety experts, Scalia, 38, is a flat-out "danger" to the safety of U.S. workers. They see a lawyer who has worked for the last decade on behalf of big business, someone who has dismissed ergonomic studies and the rules generated by them as "junk science."
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush has formalized the line of succession at several key federal agencies in case a Cabinet secretary is killed or incapacitated, a housekeeping task with fresh meaning after Sept. 11. With no fanfare, Bush signed a series of executive orders in the last week that mandate a lengthy list of officials and the order in which they would take control of their Cabinet agencies. The orders don't affect the succession for the presidency, officials said.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Justice Department lawyers have filed a federal lawsuit asking a judge to remove a member from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights so that a Bush administration appointee can succeed her on a board that tilts toward Democrats. The appointee--Peter N. Kirsanow, a Cleveland labor lawyer--was also named as one of the plaintiffs against Commissioner Victoria Wilson, who is clinging to her seat despite the White House's contention that her term expired at the end of November.
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1991 | PETER OSTERLUND, Peter Osterlund writes about politics from the Washington bureau of the Baltimore Sun.
HIS SMALL EYES BORE INTO HIS AUDIENCE WITH THE INTENSIty of searchlights. A few hundred Young Republicans reciprocate with worshipful focus. They are jammed, Jos. A. Banks-by-Laura Ashley, into some concrete auditorium on George Washington University's campus. They are mesmerized. "The challenge to your generation is not to find creative new ways to use the bureaucracy," says Newt Gingrich. "The challenge is to be creative and to make a real difference.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Still protesting his innocence while beseeching Congress to "bring this period of mindless cannibalism to an end," Jim Wright (D-Tex.) announced Wednesday that he would resign from the House and become the first Speaker in history to be forced out of office. With tears filling his eyes, the Texas Democrat told his colleagues in a powerful, hourlong speech from the well of the chamber that it had become apparent Congress would not be able to turn fully to the nation's problems before it until the long ethics investigation of his finances is resolved.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Monday nominated a veteran federal law enforcement manager to head the new agency charged with aviation security in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. John Magaw, 66, has gained a reputation during his more than 40-year government career for turning troubled bureaucracies around. He rose through the ranks to become head of the Secret Service, and directed reforms of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms after the Branch Davidian debacle.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | AARON ZITNER and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Government scientists have opened the anthrax-laden letter sent to Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) and found it to be "virtually identical" to one mailed to a colleague, Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), the FBI said Thursday. The disclosure came as scientists continued a painstaking examination of the Leahy envelope and the particles inside it, presumed to be anthrax bacteria, at the Army's biological defense unit at Ft. Detrick, Md.
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