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NEWS
July 18, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Bill L. Walters, who told a congressional committee in June that he was broke after defaulting on nearly $100 million in loans obtained from a Denver thrift with the help of Neil Bush, is now living in the lap of luxury here. In February, a trust for Walters' wife, Jacqueline, bought a $1.9-million gated estate near Newport Bay, according to county records reviewed by The Times.
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NEWS
December 11, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Justice Department lawyers have filed a federal lawsuit asking a judge to remove a member from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights so that a Bush administration appointee can succeed her on a board that tilts toward Democrats. The appointee--Peter N. Kirsanow, a Cleveland labor lawyer--was also named as one of the plaintiffs against Commissioner Victoria Wilson, who is clinging to her seat despite the White House's contention that her term expired at the end of November.
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NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA director R. James Woolsey, under fire for months for his handling of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case and lacking strong support in the White House and Congress, resigned abruptly on Wednesday. The nation's first post-Cold War spy chief never forcefully seized control of a sprawling, $30-billion-a-year intelligence bureaucracy and was not seen by his own employees or by his overseers on Capitol Hill as a strong advocate of intelligence programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | DEBORATH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California's top federal forester is being transferred to a new job, dismaying conservation groups who fear the move portends the dismantling of a plan to protect old-growth forests and fragile wildlife in the Sierra Nevada.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK and TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The $500 billion has vanished down a hole in the front yard, gone under the fine, green lawn that is bordered by a white picket fence, lost into that benign part of the American dream known as owning a home of your own. That was what savings and loan companies were for, to help the home buyer fulfill the dream. For years, they did. Then the S&Ls began to "crater," to use a favorite industry term. Good money chased bad down the maw. In the midst of it, the Pinocchios and Magoos of the U.S.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling up the Capitol steps to dramatize the barriers confronting them, scores of disabled persons rallied Monday to protest delays in congressional action on a Senate-passed bill to expand their access to jobs, transportation and public services. The legislation, endorsed by President Bush, has broad bipartisan backing but has been moving at glacial speed through four House committees since it was approved overwhelmingly by the Senate last September.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William J. Bennett, the first director of the nation's war on drugs, went out with a bang Thursday, calling one congressional critic "a gas bag" and labeling the drug-plagued District of Columbia "a basket case." President Bush, in accepting Bennett's resignation at the White House, praised his leadership in the war against drugs and said that the nation "is on the road to victory" in that war.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Still protesting his innocence while beseeching Congress to "bring this period of mindless cannibalism to an end," Jim Wright (D-Tex.) announced Wednesday that he would resign from the House and become the first Speaker in history to be forced out of office. With tears filling his eyes, the Texas Democrat told his colleagues in a powerful, hourlong speech from the well of the chamber that it had become apparent Congress would not be able to turn fully to the nation's problems before it until the long ethics investigation of his finances is resolved.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | MARJORIE WILLIAMS, The Washington Post
The U.S. chief of protocol begins by threatening to cry. The interview has been arranged for a dual profile of Ambassador Selwa (Lucky) Roosevelt and her husband, Archie, a retired CIA officer who has just published his memoirs. Most of it will take place at the couple's house in Georgetown, but the reporter has asked first to meet Mrs. Roosevelt at her office in Foggy Bottom. To catch her, as it were, in her habitat.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former top official at the Department of Housing and Urban Development continued Wednesday to rebut former HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr.'s claim that he was a "hands-off" manager who was unaware of fraud and abuse within the agency.
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The director of President Bush's program to expand religious groups' role in providing social services said Friday that he will resign, the latest setback to an initiative that has been beleaguered from its start. The resignation of John J. DiIulio Jr. as director of the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, while not entirely unexpected, nonetheless surprised many observers.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Consumer Product Safety Commission announced her resignation Wednesday, marking the latest development in the highly contentious battle to determine who will lead the regulatory agency, a fight the Bush administration indicated is far from over. Ann W. Brown, a Democrat, said in an interview it is "important" that President Bush be allowed to select his own chairperson. Her resignation will take effect Nov.
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | Associated Press
Senators approved the nomination of former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms James Ziglar on Tuesday as the new Immigration and Naturalization Service commissioner. Ziglar got a standing ovation from the senators after they approved his nomination by voice vote. "On behalf of the entire Senate, we wish Jim Ziglar well in his new role and new responsibilities," said Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), whose sentiments were echoed by Minority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.).
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Presidential advisor Karl Rove met with two lobbyists from the pharmaceutical industry last month while he owned nearly $250,000 worth of stock in two drug companies, the White House acknowledged Friday. Rove had what the White House described as an introductory meeting June 5 with Alan F. Holmer, president of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, and former Rep. Vin Weber (R-Minn.), a lobbyist whose clients include the pharmaceutical trade group.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Justice Department antitrust chief Charles A. James occupies an office on the opposite side of the building from his predecessor, Joel I. Klein. But he's sitting on the same hot seat in the antitrust prosecution of Microsoft Corp. After only two weeks on the job, James must decide in the next few weeks whether to appeal the landmark Microsoft antitrust case to the Supreme Court, engage Microsoft in a new round of settlement talks or return to U.S. District Court to fight the case again.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush's top strategist, who owned more than $100,000 of Intel Corp. stock, met in March with the company's chief executive and two lobbyists as they pushed for federal approval of a corporate merger. The administration approved the deal less than two months later. White House officials said senior advisor Karl Rove referred the computer chip-maker's executives to others in the administration and played no part in the approval.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gregory Freeman Stone's last day began with business as usual. That morning he talked with friend and next-door neighbor Floyd Nelson about the mission that had consumed more than a decade of his life: reopening the official investigation into the 1968 assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. For many who knew him, Stone was an "unsung hero," a man attempting to "rewrite history."
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Adm. James D. Watkins, the imposing 6-foot-4, silver-haired former member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who is President-elect Bush's choice to head the Energy Department, often tells the story of a pivotal moment in his most recent public role, that of chairman of the presidential AIDS commission. It occurred as he listened to the poignant testimony of the mother of a 12-year-old AIDS-infected boy who had been isolated by his classmates and his community.
NEWS
June 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Two senior Bush administration officials worked in tandem Friday to try to hold together an Israeli-Palestinian cease-fire, with CIA Director George J. Tenet convening a security meeting and Assistant Secretary of State William Burns seeking to reopen a political dialogue. The meetings represented an intensification of U.S. diplomacy in the Israeli-Palestinian dispute despite the Bush administration's determination to avoid the deep involvement maintained by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal grand jury on Friday charged veteran Rep. James A. Traficant Jr. (D-Ohio) with 10 counts of bribery and racketeering for allegedly accepting payments and gifts from businessmen and staff members, using employees to work on his farm and filing false income tax returns. Under the indictment, returned in Cleveland and made public at Justice Department headquarters, Traficant faces maximum penalties of more than 60 years in prison and $2.2 million in fines if convicted on all counts.
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