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NEWS
March 8, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Ethics Committee Wednesday cleared House Republican Whip Newt Gingrich of Georgia of major charges but decided to admonish him for two relatively minor infractions, an informed source said. After sending a letter of reprimand, the committee will drop its investigation of Gingrich, the second-ranking GOP member of the House, who filed the original charges that led to the resignation of Speaker Jim Wright last year.
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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and First Lady Laura Bush reported a net taxable income of $744,682 for 2000 and paid $240,342 in federal income taxes, White House figures released Friday show. But both those numbers were dwarfed by income figures released for Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife, Lynne, which showed the couple had an adjusted gross income of $36 million last year and paid more than $14 million in federal taxes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Woodland Hills) is one of 15 members of the House of Representatives criticized by a taxpayers watchdog group for sending out more than a quarter of a million publicly funded mailers in the days immediately before the 1994 pre-election deadline.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | ALAN C. MILLER and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary defends her department against budget-cutting proposals to dismantle it by portraying herself as a master economizer in government--reducing her work force, boosting efficiency and saving taxpayers' money. But when she hits the road in her job, as she often does, O'Leary apparently is no bargain hunter. Traveling in a style that is unusual, if not unique, among her Cabinet colleagues, O'Leary is the jet-setter of the Clinton Administration.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to public anger over perquisites for federal officeholders, Senate and House leaders announced Friday that members of Congress will pay higher fees for health clubs and medical services and may no longer buy low-cost luxury items at special stores at the Capitol. The Senate also sharply reduced the hours of operation for the senators' dining room, while the House reaffirmed that congressmen no longer will be able to get parking tickets fixed by the sergeant-at-arms.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, bitterly divided along party lines, approved a broad overhaul of campaign finance laws Wednesday night after voting to bar senators from accepting outside speaking fees known as honorariums. The Democratic-sponsored measure, adopted by a vote of 59 to 40, is aimed at cutting the soaring cost of Senate campaigns and the growing use of special interest money in them. "The President certainly will veto a bill in this form, and I'm sure a veto will stand up," said Sen.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate Ethics Committee said Thursday that it would begin a trial-like hearing on Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.) because of "substantial credible evidence" that he violated Senate rules and federal law. Most of the allegations concern a book promotion arrangement under which the senator made speeches and accepted fees to promote two books he wrote.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the harshest punishments it has ever recommended, the Senate Ethics Committee unanimously urged the full Senate Wednesday to denounce Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.) for "reprehensible" financial dealings and to require him to make restitution of more than $100,000. The bipartisan panel also suggested that Durenberger's Republican colleagues consider further disciplinary action, such as taking away choice committee assignments or leadership positions.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate Ethics Committee is investigating 113 paid appearances by Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.) to determine whether he violated limits on outside income in 1985-86, according to a letter from the panel released Friday. The letter to Durenberger, required under the panel's rules, provided additional details of its investigation into the lawmaker's controversial book contract and other dealings.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every three weeks, Rep. Robert K. Dornan posts a long letter to 25,000 of his conservative soulmates, many of them elderly and most hundreds of miles removed from his Orange County congressional district. One letter begins with a folksy anecdote about the birth of a grandchild, another with a strident call to arms over the latest liberal assault on traditional values. All the letters end the same way--with an urgent appeal for money. "There are so many battles yet to be fought," Dornan writes.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | SARA FRITZ and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno has ordered Justice Department investigators to expand their investigation of Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to pursue evidence that he may have illegally concealed his investment in a trouble-plagued, low-income apartment complex in suburban Maryland, according to knowledgeable sources. The order was issued earlier this week in response to reports that Brown had reported his investment on his annual financial disclosure forms inaccurately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Woodland Hills) is one of 15 members of the House of Representatives criticized by a taxpayers watchdog group for sending out more than a quarter of a million publicly funded mailers in the days immediately before the 1994 pre-election deadline.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. William E. Dannemeyer, one of the most fiscally conservative members of Congress, also is the wealthiest representative from Orange County, with assets of at least $2 million, according to federal financial disclosure reports made public Thursday. Dannemeyer (R-Fullerton), who will retire from Congress next January, is also the most traveled of Orange County's five members of Congress.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is an intensely private person in a public maelstrom, feeling unjustly accused but unwilling to strike back openly at her critics. Much to her shock and surprise, Heather Foley has found herself caught up in the increasingly nasty debate over who deserves the blame for the political scandals surrounding the slipshod financial operations of the House bank and post office. As the wife of Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to public anger over perquisites for federal officeholders, Senate and House leaders announced Friday that members of Congress will pay higher fees for health clubs and medical services and may no longer buy low-cost luxury items at special stores at the Capitol. The Senate also sharply reduced the hours of operation for the senators' dining room, while the House reaffirmed that congressmen no longer will be able to get parking tickets fixed by the sergeant-at-arms.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. William H. Gray III (D-Pa.), the outgoing House whip, dismissed as rumors any suggestion he is resigning because of alleged Justice Department scrutiny of his financial affairs. "There's no investigation of me at all," Gray said on CNN's "Newsmaker Saturday." Gray, 49, who resigned to head the United Negro College Fund, said rumors about a Justice Department probe seem to crop up every time he changes jobs.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every three weeks, Rep. Robert K. Dornan posts a long letter to 25,000 of his conservative soul-mates, many of them elderly and most of them hundreds of miles removed from his Orange County congressional district. One letter begins with a folksy anecdote about the birth of a grandchild, another with a strident call to arms over the latest liberal assault on traditional values. But all the letters end the same way--with an urgent appeal for money.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. William H. Gray III (D-Pa.), the outgoing House whip, dismissed as rumors any suggestion he is resigning because of alleged Justice Department scrutiny of his financial affairs. "There's no investigation of me at all," Gray said on CNN's "Newsmaker Saturday." Gray, 49, who resigned to head the United Negro College Fund, said rumors about a Justice Department probe seem to crop up every time he changes jobs.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department is reviewing Sen. Mark O. Hatfield's acceptance from a university president of $9,300 worth of gifts that he failed to list on Senate financial disclosure forms, according to sources familiar with the inquiry. FBI agents have examined the Oregon Republican's disclosure forms and have requested records of gifts to the senator by the University of South Carolina, according to Senate records and a university spokeswoman.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Deputy White House Budget Director William M. Diefenderfer III found it hard to make ends meet last winter, he had no choice but to look for a job in private industry. His bosses never even considered tapping other sources to supplement his government paycheck. That clearly would have been illegal. But when Jonathan E. Winer, legal counsel to Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.
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