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NEWS
January 13, 1992
In response to "Buchanan an Anti-Semite? It's a Smear," by Murray Rothbard, Column Right, Jan. 6: As a professor of economics, Rothbard should distinguish between a person's ideas and his personality. His friend Buchanan may be a human being with some admirable person-to-person traits. But does this excuse a consistent trail of disturbing comments that seem to put him on the side of those who hate the Jewish people?
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Is it time for Vice President Dick Cheney to lighten his workload? Not if you listen to Dick Cheney. "I've been living this way for 25 years," he told an aide this week after he underwent a procedure to reopen a narrowed artery. "I've been dealing with this for decades." Despite chronic heart disease and four heart attacks, Cheney says he has no desire to slow down. "He was dismissive" about the idea, said Mary Matalin, the aide who raised it with him.
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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno returned to work a day after her second fainting spell in a year, and promised to take a vacation soon. Her doctors were reexamining one of her medications. One of this city's leading workaholics, the 60-year-old attorney general was released from an overnight hospital stay and was back at her desk by 8 a.m. Monday after her doctor pronounced her "100% fit for duty."
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno returned to work a day after her second fainting spell in a year, and promised to take a vacation soon. Her doctors were reexamining one of her medications. One of this city's leading workaholics, the 60-year-old attorney general was released from an overnight hospital stay and was back at her desk by 8 a.m. Monday after her doctor pronounced her "100% fit for duty."
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) brushed off fears he cannot do his job after undergoing his second treatment for a brain tumor in three years. Specter was in a buoyant mood after an 80-minute treatment for a benign tumor. Doctors fired beams of radiation at the coat-button-sized tumor, which had grown from cells left over from Specter's 1993 brain surgery, when a 2-inch tumor was removed. "I feel fine," Specter, 66, said four hours after the treatment.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If President Bush's heart continues to respond inadequately to medication, doctors may attempt this morning to shock it into a proper pace and rhythm--a procedure that would entail at least a brief transfer of power to Vice President Dan Quayle. "We're hopeful the medicine will do the job," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said Sunday night.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not Sen. Alan Cranston's threats to expose ethics violations by other senators that saved the California Democrat from being censured by the Senate for his conduct in the "Keating Five" affair, sources said Friday. Instead, the Senate Ethics Committee was swayed by a behind-the-scenes appeal from a Cranston friend, Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), who argued that Cranston should be spared the embarrassment of censure because of his poor health.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For George Bush, more perhaps than any other recent President, a medical order to slow down could require a fundamental change not only in lifestyle but in the conduct of his presidency. Bush's play habits, his power walks, speed golf and "walleyball"--volleyball played off the walls of a racquetball court--have become well-known parts of his public image. More important, however, is the intensely "hands-on" style of his work habits.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno fainted Sunday in church, and was expected to remain overnight in a Georgetown hospital for observation. A hospital physician described her condition as "good," and Reno told President Clinton she was feeling fine. For the second time in about a year, Reno felt nauseated and then fainted, but recovered relatively quickly. The first incident occurred in November at a law conference in Mexico City and was attributed to exhaustion and fatigue.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), who brought a rare sense of humor to his three decades in Congress and once sought the presidency, announced Friday that he is resigning because of ill health. Udall, 68, who has Parkinson's disease and recently suffered injuries in a fall, will resign his House seat effective May 4, administrative aide Matt James said. The announcement ended months of speculation about Udall's health and political future.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno fainted Sunday in church, and was expected to remain overnight in a Georgetown hospital for observation. A hospital physician described her condition as "good," and Reno told President Clinton she was feeling fine. For the second time in about a year, Reno felt nauseated and then fainted, but recovered relatively quickly. The first incident occurred in November at a law conference in Mexico City and was attributed to exhaustion and fatigue.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) brushed off fears he cannot do his job after undergoing his second treatment for a brain tumor in three years. Specter was in a buoyant mood after an 80-minute treatment for a benign tumor. Doctors fired beams of radiation at the coat-button-sized tumor, which had grown from cells left over from Specter's 1993 brain surgery, when a 2-inch tumor was removed. "I feel fine," Specter, 66, said four hours after the treatment.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | from Associated Press
Former Defense Secretary Les Aspin was in critical condition at Georgetown University Medical Center on Saturday after suffering a stroke. "Upon admission he was awake, lucid and speaking," said Michael Tebo, a spokesman for the hospital. "The next several days will be critical, but his doctors are hopeful for a good recovery." Tebo said Aspin was listed in critical condition and that his family had asked that no further details be disclosed.
NEWS
January 13, 1992
In response to "Buchanan an Anti-Semite? It's a Smear," by Murray Rothbard, Column Right, Jan. 6: As a professor of economics, Rothbard should distinguish between a person's ideas and his personality. His friend Buchanan may be a human being with some admirable person-to-person traits. But does this excuse a consistent trail of disturbing comments that seem to put him on the side of those who hate the Jewish people?
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not Sen. Alan Cranston's threats to expose ethics violations by other senators that saved the California Democrat from being censured by the Senate for his conduct in the "Keating Five" affair, sources said Friday. Instead, the Senate Ethics Committee was swayed by a behind-the-scenes appeal from a Cranston friend, Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), who argued that Cranston should be spared the embarrassment of censure because of his poor health.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If President Bush's heart continues to respond inadequately to medication, doctors may attempt this morning to shock it into a proper pace and rhythm--a procedure that would entail at least a brief transfer of power to Vice President Dan Quayle. "We're hopeful the medicine will do the job," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said Sunday night.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | from Associated Press
Former Defense Secretary Les Aspin was in critical condition at Georgetown University Medical Center on Saturday after suffering a stroke. "Upon admission he was awake, lucid and speaking," said Michael Tebo, a spokesman for the hospital. "The next several days will be critical, but his doctors are hopeful for a good recovery." Tebo said Aspin was listed in critical condition and that his family had asked that no further details be disclosed.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Is it time for Vice President Dick Cheney to lighten his workload? Not if you listen to Dick Cheney. "I've been living this way for 25 years," he told an aide this week after he underwent a procedure to reopen a narrowed artery. "I've been dealing with this for decades." Despite chronic heart disease and four heart attacks, Cheney says he has no desire to slow down. "He was dismissive" about the idea, said Mary Matalin, the aide who raised it with him.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For George Bush, more perhaps than any other recent President, a medical order to slow down could require a fundamental change not only in lifestyle but in the conduct of his presidency. Bush's play habits, his power walks, speed golf and "walleyball"--volleyball played off the walls of a racquetball court--have become well-known parts of his public image. More important, however, is the intensely "hands-on" style of his work habits.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), who brought a rare sense of humor to his three decades in Congress and once sought the presidency, announced Friday that he is resigning because of ill health. Udall, 68, who has Parkinson's disease and recently suffered injuries in a fall, will resign his House seat effective May 4, administrative aide Matt James said. The announcement ended months of speculation about Udall's health and political future.
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