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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995
It wasn't a great beach day by the Santa Monica Pier. It already was cloudy when police blocked off the bike path. Then they shut down the pier for a time. And lifeguard patrol boats hovered ominously just offshore. But this was no drowning or beach-side brawl. It was security for a quick visit by Vice President Al Gore--in town to schmooze environmental allies and bash the Republicans for their proposed amendments to the Clean Water Act.
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NEWS
October 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
A posh mountain resort has a new tourist attraction: a once-secret underground bunker built during the Cold War to house members of Congress and their families in case of nuclear attack. After 40 years, the Defense Department recently relinquished control of the bunker, which is deep beneath the West Virginia Wing of the Greenbrier, a resort about 80 miles southwest of Charleston in White Sulphur Springs.
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NEWS
April 23, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The government has taken extraordinary security precautions this week to shield President Reagan, Vice President George Bush and other top government officials from possible terrorist reprisals in the wake of military clashes in the Persian Gulf and several terrorist incidents worldwide. A sign proclaiming "Terrorist Condition Alpha. Threat Actual" was visible at the main gate of Andrews Air Force Base near Washington as Air Force One prepared to fly Reagan to a speaking engagement Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995
It wasn't a great beach day by the Santa Monica Pier. It already was cloudy when police blocked off the bike path. Then they shut down the pier for a time. And lifeguard patrol boats hovered ominously just offshore. But this was no drowning or beach-side brawl. It was security for a quick visit by Vice President Al Gore--in town to schmooze environmental allies and bash the Republicans for their proposed amendments to the Clean Water Act.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The upsurge in guerrilla violence here, including a rocket attack on the site where the Organization of American States meeting will be held next week, has raised such serious security concerns that the State Department has considered canceling Secretary of State George P. Shultz's appearance at the group's opening session on Monday.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | The Washington Post
The Administration decided to follow tradition this week and have one Cabinet member not attend President Clinton's speech to a joint session of Congress at the Capitol. The tradition, insisted upon by the Secret Service, is to ensure that some member of the Cabinet can take command of the government if a calamity occurs and the line of succession is wiped out. By law, after Vice President Al Gore, the line of succession falls to House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | from Associated Press
Ten federal departments spent $5.1 million in less than three years on security for Cabinet secretaries, with guards sometimes providing personal services like carrying luggage, a government report said. The General Accounting Office issued the report late Friday in response to a request in July from 105 members of the House after news reports questioned whether some low-profile Cabinet officials needed security.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
A posh mountain resort has a new tourist attraction: a once-secret underground bunker built during the Cold War to house members of Congress and their families in case of nuclear attack. After 40 years, the Defense Department recently relinquished control of the bunker, which is deep beneath the West Virginia Wing of the Greenbrier, a resort about 80 miles southwest of Charleston in White Sulphur Springs.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, reflecting increased security concerns in the wake of the Colombian drug crisis, is traveling around Washington in a specially armored Cadillac limousine and has begun leaving his Justice Department office by varying routes. "The FBI felt it was necessary for his security," said David Runkel, Thornburgh's chief spokesman.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | KAREN KAPLAN, karen.kaplan@latimes.com
From his office window in Jersey City, Joseph Atick stared across the Hudson River to lower Manhattan last week and was jolted by the sight of twin skyscrapers set aflame by hijacked passenger jets. "It was just unbelievable," said Atick, who lost a friend in the attack. "To see the skyline altered once and for all without the World Trade Center is a major shock." It took several hours for the reality to set in. But once it did, Atick and his colleagues at Visionics Corp.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | from Associated Press
Ten federal departments spent $5.1 million in less than three years on security for Cabinet secretaries, with guards sometimes providing personal services like carrying luggage, a government report said. The General Accounting Office issued the report late Friday in response to a request in July from 105 members of the House after news reports questioned whether some low-profile Cabinet officials needed security.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | The Washington Post
The Administration decided to follow tradition this week and have one Cabinet member not attend President Clinton's speech to a joint session of Congress at the Capitol. The tradition, insisted upon by the Secret Service, is to ensure that some member of the Cabinet can take command of the government if a calamity occurs and the line of succession is wiped out. By law, after Vice President Al Gore, the line of succession falls to House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, reflecting increased security concerns in the wake of the Colombian drug crisis, is traveling around Washington in a specially armored Cadillac limousine and has begun leaving his Justice Department office by varying routes. "The FBI felt it was necessary for his security," said David Runkel, Thornburgh's chief spokesman.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The upsurge in guerrilla violence here, including a rocket attack on the site where the Organization of American States meeting will be held next week, has raised such serious security concerns that the State Department has considered canceling Secretary of State George P. Shultz's appearance at the group's opening session on Monday.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The government has taken extraordinary security precautions this week to shield President Reagan, Vice President George Bush and other top government officials from possible terrorist reprisals in the wake of military clashes in the Persian Gulf and several terrorist incidents worldwide. A sign proclaiming "Terrorist Condition Alpha. Threat Actual" was visible at the main gate of Andrews Air Force Base near Washington as Air Force One prepared to fly Reagan to a speaking engagement Thursday.
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