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United States Government Officials Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
October 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that he will leave the Cabinet even if President Bush is reelected to a second term. "I can't afford it anymore. I'm a retired Navy veteran. I have had to give up $300,000 in retirement pay," Watkins, a retired admiral and former chief of naval operations, told reporters. He gave no details on his plans after leaving the Cabinet. Watkins was among Cabinet members appointed by Bush when he took office in 1989.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 2000 | Reuters
The Senate passed a bill that gives Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan an 11% raise. The Fed measure was included in the American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act, which among other things boosts Greenspan's pay to about $157,000 a year--up from $141,300--to put the Fed chief's pay on par with those of U.S. Cabinet members. The bill, which passed by voice vote, also fattens the paychecks of the seven Fed governors, who also vote on U.S.
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NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JIM GERSTENZANG and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, accepting the recommendations of a high-level presidential commission, has approved a 50% pay increase for top federal officials, judges and members of Congress, the White House announced Thursday night. The pay recommendation, which would cost the taxpayers an estimated $300 million a year, will be included in the final federal budget that Reagan will send to Congress on Monday for fiscal 1990.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Congress voted final approval Thursday to legislation doubling the next president's salary to $400,000 and letting lawmakers themselves receive pay boosts of $4,600 or more. Also getting pay raises in January would be Vice President Al Gore, Cabinet secretaries and about 1,300 other top-level executive branch officials. By law, they get the same cost-of-living increases that members of Congress do. The raises--plus a 4.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Members of President Bush's ethics commission agreed Wednesday that senior officials of all three branches of the government should be barred from accepting fees for speeches and articles, regardless of whether they get a pay raise. "The evil of honoraria is so great--from the appearance of a conflict of interest," former Atty. Gen. Griffin Bell said in proposing that the fees be banned. "People wonder who's paying all these honoraria. It undermines confidence in government."
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The 50% pay raise that President Reagan has recommended for senior government officials, members of Congress and federal judges would also give him a 56% increase in his federal pension, a White House spokesman said Saturday. The President's pension is equal to the pay of Cabinet secretaries, which would increase from the current $99,500 to $155,000, if the House and Senate do not vote by Feb.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | The Washington Post
House leaders began moving legislation Friday that would double the president's salary to $400,000 annually after President Clinton leaves office in 2001. The proposal, if approved by the House and Senate, would represent the first pay raise for the nation's chief executive in 30 years. The plan was wrapped into a huge spending bill approved by a House Appropriations subcommittee. The provision was not debated.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2000 | Reuters
The Senate passed a bill that gives Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan an 11% raise. The Fed measure was included in the American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act, which among other things boosts Greenspan's pay to about $157,000 a year--up from $141,300--to put the Fed chief's pay on par with those of U.S. Cabinet members. The bill, which passed by voice vote, also fattens the paychecks of the seven Fed governors, who also vote on U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
With remarkable swiftness, the House of Representatives passed a $3,000 increase in the congressional salary of $133,600. On a vote of 231-192, and after a desultory debate in which the pay raise was never mentioned, lawmakers approved a routine Treasury Department spending bill shorn of a provision used routinely to block cost-of-living increases for lawmakers. "They're pushing it through so they don't have to talk about" the 2.3% raise, Rep. Linda Smith (R-Wash.) said of the GOP leadership.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge refused to block January's 3.2% pay raise for members of Congress. U.S. District Judge Stanley Sporkin said groups challenging the increase did not convince him the automatic adjustment violated the 27th Amendment to the Constitution. The challengers said they would appeal. The amendment, ratified in May, says: "No law varying the compensation for the services of the senators and representatives shall take effect until an election of representatives shall have intervened."
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | The Washington Post
House leaders began moving legislation Friday that would double the president's salary to $400,000 annually after President Clinton leaves office in 2001. The proposal, if approved by the House and Senate, would represent the first pay raise for the nation's chief executive in 30 years. The plan was wrapped into a huge spending bill approved by a House Appropriations subcommittee. The provision was not debated.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawmakers edged closer to a $3,000 cost-of-living increase to their $133,600 salaries as the House lined up behind the raise after impassioned debate. The bipartisan 229-199 vote was on an arcane parliamentary motion that merely sought to force a nonbinding vote on the pay raise. Opponents forced the hourlong debate and roll call after complaining they had been hoodwinked last week when the leadership in both parties swiftly moved pay-linked legislation through the House.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
With remarkable swiftness, the House of Representatives passed a $3,000 increase in the congressional salary of $133,600. On a vote of 231-192, and after a desultory debate in which the pay raise was never mentioned, lawmakers approved a routine Treasury Department spending bill shorn of a provision used routinely to block cost-of-living increases for lawmakers. "They're pushing it through so they don't have to talk about" the 2.3% raise, Rep. Linda Smith (R-Wash.) said of the GOP leadership.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | Associated Press
Lawmakers voted Tuesday to block a $3,473 congressional pay increase that would have taken effect in January, 1995. House and Senate negotiators restored language to an appropriations bill that will freeze the pay of rank-and-file lawmakers at $133,600. A small group of congressional leaders receive more. Congress also skipped its raise for 1994. The appropriations measure, which finances the Treasury Department and other agencies, must come before both houses for approval.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after he was caught up in the House bank overdraft scandal in early 1992, Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon) announced that he would turn back half of his congressional paycheck until the unemployment rate improved in his district by 2 percentage points. It didn't. It got worse. So having already donated $64,000 to the U.S.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying through on a campaign promise, freshman Rep. Michael Huffington (R-Santa Barbara), one of the wealthiest members of the U.S. House, has announced that he will donate his first year's pay to start an organization to help needy children in his district.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Coronado), after four days of hearing constituents berate him over his 407 overdrafts at the House bank, now says he is ready to pay for his political sins--literally. In a rare show of contrition by an elected official, Hunter is vowing to turn back to the U.S. Treasury half his congressional take-home pay until the unemployment rate in his district drops 2 percentage points.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | Associated Press
A planned congressional pay raise, which would boost lawmakers' salaries to $133,600 on Jan. 1, was challenged in a federal court lawsuit Thursday by 20 members of Congress plus nearly 100 House and Senate candidates. The more than $340-a-month, 3.2% cost-of-living increase should be declared in violation of the 27th Amendment, according to the suit filed in U.S. District Court. Rank-and-file House and Senate members currently earn $129,500.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge refused to block January's 3.2% pay raise for members of Congress. U.S. District Judge Stanley Sporkin said groups challenging the increase did not convince him the automatic adjustment violated the 27th Amendment to the Constitution. The challengers said they would appeal. The amendment, ratified in May, says: "No law varying the compensation for the services of the senators and representatives shall take effect until an election of representatives shall have intervened."
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | Associated Press
A planned congressional pay raise, which would boost lawmakers' salaries to $133,600 on Jan. 1, was challenged in a federal court lawsuit Thursday by 20 members of Congress plus nearly 100 House and Senate candidates. The more than $340-a-month, 3.2% cost-of-living increase should be declared in violation of the 27th Amendment, according to the suit filed in U.S. District Court. Rank-and-file House and Senate members currently earn $129,500.
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