Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Government Programs
IN THE NEWS

United States Government Programs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From what politicians here are saying and doing, you could be forgiven for believing that they are hellbent on saving your Social Security benefits from vaporizing before you collect them. The Republican majority in Congress moved legislation to put Social Security's excess tax revenues into a "lockbox," where they could not be looted to finance other government programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A groundbreaking report on the effects of welfare reform shows that children fare best when parents continue to receive supplemental cash from the government after going to work. When programs "make work pay" by rewarding working parents with continued cash allowances or other earnings supplements, the children tend to perform measurably better in school and have fewer health and behavioral problems, the report found. The Manpower Demonstration Research Corp.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Aside from a few gnawing doubts in such areas as food stamp programs and foreign airports, the government is ready for Y2K, lawmakers said Monday. Most important now, they said, is to avoid public panic. Rep. Stephen Horn (R-Long Beach), who closely follows the Y2K computer problem, said air traffic control systems are among those with work still to be done, but he emphasized that flying on Jan. 1 will be safe. The Federal Aviation Administration said all its systems are Y2K compliant.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional Republicans have dropped legislation that would help pregnant legal immigrants and their children to regain health care benefits that were taken away as part of the 1996 welfare reform law, legislative aides said Monday.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday said that it would decide whether federally funded lawyers for the poor have a free-speech right to challenge the government's new restrictions on welfare. The case, to be heard in the fall, renews a long-running fight between advocates for the poor and congressional conservatives.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional Republicans have dropped legislation that would help pregnant legal immigrants and their children to regain health care benefits that were taken away as part of the 1996 welfare reform law, legislative aides said Monday.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The promise of managed care for Medicare recipients--that older Americans could receive low-cost comprehensive health coverage--was dealt its hardest blow yet when the federal government reported Monday that 933,000 older Americans will be dumped from HMO plans next year. The figure is about 30% higher than originally had estimated by the industry, and will bring the number of seniors dumped from HMO rolls in just three years to 1.7 million.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-distance callers could face an additional 0.4% surcharge on their bills starting later this year under a proposal embraced by President Clinton on Monday to help provide low-cost telephone service to needy residents on Indian reservations. The surcharge would add $17 million a year to an existing $5-billion federal program that helps impoverished Native Americans pay for phone service.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A groundbreaking report on the effects of welfare reform shows that children fare best when parents continue to receive supplemental cash from the government after going to work. When programs "make work pay" by rewarding working parents with continued cash allowances or other earnings supplements, the children tend to perform measurably better in school and have fewer health and behavioral problems, the report found. The Manpower Demonstration Research Corp.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1999 | From Washington Post
Social Security benefits will rise 2.4% in January, the largest cost-of-living increase in three years, the Social Security Administration announced Tuesday. The average monthly benefit amount will go from $785 to $804. For the average elderly couple, the benefit will increase $32, to $1,348 each month. The decision continues a 1990s trend of modest increases.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Twenty states that have used a Medicaid loophole to inflate how much they are spending for medical services and generate large federal reimbursements soon will have to operate under tighter restrictions. A proposed federal rule issued Thursday aims to eliminate the gap and save the government billions of dollars. "We cannot stand by while billions of taxpayer dollars are used without the accountability that federal taxpayers deserve," said Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
The government warned states on Wednesday to end a practice by which they temporarily transfer money into their own Medicaid programs to earn higher matching funds from the federal government. In a sharply worded letter, Timothy M. Westmoreland, director of the Health Care Financing Administration, which oversees Medicaid, said many states allow their Medicaid providers to keep only a fraction of the nearly $2 billion generated by the transfers.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The promise of managed care for Medicare recipients--that older Americans could receive low-cost comprehensive health coverage--was dealt its hardest blow yet when the federal government reported Monday that 933,000 older Americans will be dumped from HMO plans next year. The figure is about 30% higher than originally had estimated by the industry, and will bring the number of seniors dumped from HMO rolls in just three years to 1.7 million.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2000 | MARCY GORDON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Clinton administration is proposing a $30-million plan to help millions of low-income people open low-cost, basic bank accounts, Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers said Monday. An estimated 10% of U.S. households, or about 10 million families, do not have bank accounts, in part because of rising bank and ATM fees, the closing of bank branches in poor city neighborhoods and rural towns, and distrust of banks in general.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-distance callers could face an additional 0.4% surcharge on their bills starting later this year under a proposal embraced by President Clinton on Monday to help provide low-cost telephone service to needy residents on Indian reservations. The surcharge would add $17 million a year to an existing $5-billion federal program that helps impoverished Native Americans pay for phone service.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday said that it would decide whether federally funded lawyers for the poor have a free-speech right to challenge the government's new restrictions on welfare. The case, to be heard in the fall, renews a long-running fight between advocates for the poor and congressional conservatives.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2000 | MARCY GORDON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Clinton administration is proposing a $30-million plan to help millions of low-income people open low-cost, basic bank accounts, Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers said Monday. An estimated 10% of U.S. households, or about 10 million families, do not have bank accounts, in part because of rising bank and ATM fees, the closing of bank branches in poor city neighborhoods and rural towns, and distrust of banks in general.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Twenty states that have used a Medicaid loophole to inflate how much they are spending for medical services and generate large federal reimbursements soon will have to operate under tighter restrictions. A proposed federal rule issued Thursday aims to eliminate the gap and save the government billions of dollars. "We cannot stand by while billions of taxpayer dollars are used without the accountability that federal taxpayers deserve," said Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Aside from a few gnawing doubts in such areas as food stamp programs and foreign airports, the government is ready for Y2K, lawmakers said Monday. Most important now, they said, is to avoid public panic. Rep. Stephen Horn (R-Long Beach), who closely follows the Y2K computer problem, said air traffic control systems are among those with work still to be done, but he emphasized that flying on Jan. 1 will be safe. The Federal Aviation Administration said all its systems are Y2K compliant.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From what politicians here are saying and doing, you could be forgiven for believing that they are hellbent on saving your Social Security benefits from vaporizing before you collect them. The Republican majority in Congress moved legislation to put Social Security's excess tax revenues into a "lockbox," where they could not be looted to finance other government programs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|