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July 1, 2006 | Jim Peltz, Times Staff Writer
The good news for Scott Speed is that his rookie year as a Formula One driver is playing out as he expected. That's also the bad news. The Manteca, Calif., native became the first American driver in Formula One in more than a decade, fulfilling his childhood goal of competing in the glamorous racing series.
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July 1, 2006 | Jim Peltz, Times Staff Writer
The good news for Scott Speed is that his rookie year as a Formula One driver is playing out as he expected. That's also the bad news. The Manteca, Calif., native became the first American driver in Formula One in more than a decade, fulfilling his childhood goal of competing in the glamorous racing series.
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SPORTS
September 23, 2000 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may come as a surprise to the 225,000 people who paid $75 to $150 for tickets to Sunday's U.S. Grand Prix, but as far as Formula One is concerned, they are nothing more than a backdrop for a TV show. "Formula One is a TV sport," said Max Mosley, president of Federation Internationale de l'Automobile, governing body of world motor sports. "Fans at the track are like extras in a movie, filling the background." More than 275 million fans worldwide are expected to watch the race.
SPORTS
June 30, 2006 | JIM PELTZ
A year after American fans were infuriated by a botched Formula One race at the series' U.S. stop, one might think the series would be bending over backward to make amends at this year's race. Well, yes and no. Formula One is indeed trying to boost its goodwill among fans arriving for this year's U.S. Grand Prix at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Spectators were allowed to walk the pits and get drivers' autographs Thursday.
SPORTS
June 30, 2006 | JIM PELTZ
A year after American fans were infuriated by a botched Formula One race at the series' U.S. stop, one might think the series would be bending over backward to make amends at this year's race. Well, yes and no. Formula One is indeed trying to boost its goodwill among fans arriving for this year's U.S. Grand Prix at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Spectators were allowed to walk the pits and get drivers' autographs Thursday.
SPORTS
September 24, 2000
THE RACE * Site--Indianapolis. * When--Today (Fox Sports Net, 11 a.m.) * Track--Indianapolis Motor Speedway (road course, 2.606 miles, 13 turns). * Race distance--190.294 miles, 73 laps. * Last year--Inaugural race. * Last race--Michael Schumacher revived his title hopes by winning the Italian Grand Prix in Monza, a race in which a chain collision on the first lap knocked out seven cars and killed a course worker.
SPORTS
September 24, 2000 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How ironic, having a Formula One race with the largest crowd in series history, in a country where it is least appreciated. That will be the situation today when 225,000 spectators jam portions of Indianapolis Motor Speedway to watch Finland's Mika Hakkinen and Germany's Michael Schumacher continue their quest for the world's most coveted motor racing championship on a 2.606-mile course that is half twisting and technical and half high speed and flat out.
SPORTS
June 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
One by one, 14 Formula One cars ducked off the racetrack and parked in a unified protest over safety concerns at the U.S. Grand Prix. From their seats in the grandstands, the few American fans of the globe-trotting racing series watched in wide-eyed disbelief as only six cars started Sunday's event at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The drivers were embarrassed. The fans were disgusted. Any chance Formula One had of capturing the American audience was crippled. "I feel terrible.
SPORTS
June 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
One by one, 14 Formula One cars ducked off the racetrack and parked in a unified protest over safety concerns at the U.S. Grand Prix. From their seats in the grandstands, the few American fans of the globe-trotting racing series watched in wide-eyed disbelief as only six cars started Sunday's event at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The drivers were embarrassed. The fans were disgusted. Any chance Formula One had of capturing the American audience was crippled. "I feel terrible.
SPORTS
September 24, 2000
THE RACE * Site--Indianapolis. * When--Today (Fox Sports Net, 11 a.m.) * Track--Indianapolis Motor Speedway (road course, 2.606 miles, 13 turns). * Race distance--190.294 miles, 73 laps. * Last year--Inaugural race. * Last race--Michael Schumacher revived his title hopes by winning the Italian Grand Prix in Monza, a race in which a chain collision on the first lap knocked out seven cars and killed a course worker.
SPORTS
September 24, 2000 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How ironic, having a Formula One race with the largest crowd in series history, in a country where it is least appreciated. That will be the situation today when 225,000 spectators jam portions of Indianapolis Motor Speedway to watch Finland's Mika Hakkinen and Germany's Michael Schumacher continue their quest for the world's most coveted motor racing championship on a 2.606-mile course that is half twisting and technical and half high speed and flat out.
SPORTS
September 23, 2000 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may come as a surprise to the 225,000 people who paid $75 to $150 for tickets to Sunday's U.S. Grand Prix, but as far as Formula One is concerned, they are nothing more than a backdrop for a TV show. "Formula One is a TV sport," said Max Mosley, president of Federation Internationale de l'Automobile, governing body of world motor sports. "Fans at the track are like extras in a movie, filling the background." More than 275 million fans worldwide are expected to watch the race.
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