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BUSINESS
June 21, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Prudential Insurance Co. of America's federal racketeering lawsuit against United States Gypsum Co. and other asbestos manufacturers has been dismissed by a federal judge, 14 years after it was filed. Prudential had sued United States Gypsum and six other firms in October 1987 to recover the cost of asbestos removal from 61 buildings it owned in several U.S. cities. The case was consolidated and later covered 18 buildings and four companies. U.S. District Judge Harold A.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Prudential Insurance Co. of America's federal racketeering lawsuit against United States Gypsum Co. and other asbestos manufacturers has been dismissed by a federal judge, 14 years after it was filed. Prudential had sued United States Gypsum and six other firms in October 1987 to recover the cost of asbestos removal from 61 buildings it owned in several U.S. cities. The case was consolidated and later covered 18 buildings and four companies. U.S. District Judge Harold A.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
4 More Companies Settle With Asbestos Plaintiffs: Another four companies have settled their cases with plaintiffs in the country's largest asbestos trial, leaving only six defendants as the trial draws to a close. Armstrong World Industries Inc., National Gypsum Co., Quigley Co. and U.S. Gypsum settled with plaintiffs on Saturday to avoid the possibility of a large jury verdict against the companies, said attorney Peter Angelos, who represents most of the trial's 8,555 plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
4 More Companies Settle With Asbestos Plaintiffs: Another four companies have settled their cases with plaintiffs in the country's largest asbestos trial, leaving only six defendants as the trial draws to a close. Armstrong World Industries Inc., National Gypsum Co., Quigley Co. and U.S. Gypsum settled with plaintiffs on Saturday to avoid the possibility of a large jury verdict against the companies, said attorney Peter Angelos, who represents most of the trial's 8,555 plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989
Ralph C. Joynes, president and chief operating officer of USG Corp., plans to take early retirement but did not specify a date. USG Chairman Robert J. Day will retire on normal schedule in May, 1990. As part of an orderly plan of succession for management, two senior management executives have been given new responsibilities. Eugene B.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2001 | Chicago Tribune
USG Corp. succumbed to multimillion-dollar asbestos claims, filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time in the Chicago firm's 99-year history. The nation's No. 1 maker of wallboard became the eighth company in the last 18 months to turn to bankruptcy court to shield it from the financially debilitating effects of asbestos litigation. USG's major domestic subsidiaries also filed Chapter 11 petitions, including United States Gypsum Co., USG Interiors Inc. and L&W Supply Corp.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1985
Walt Disney Productions announced Tuesday that Michael L. Bagnall, executive vice president-finance and a key player during the Burbank company's yearlong wrangle with unwanted suitors, has decided to take early retirement and will leave the company sometime in the fall. Disney said Bagnall, 54, will continue in his role as chief financial officer through the summer and for "an indefinite period thereafter." Following his retirement, Bagnall will serve as a consultant to the firm.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Billionaire Carl Icahn lost at least $66 million when shares of a company he bet against soared, a regulatory filing indicates. American Real Estate Partners, Icahn's publicly traded holding company, "shorted" 2.5 million shares of a company in bankruptcy in late 2004, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Icahn borrowed and sold shares in anticipation they would fall. Instead, the stock climbed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1987 | JACK MATHEWS
The following is excerpted from "Things Go Better With Pope," a chapter in the book "The Rise and Fall of Hollywood: The First Century," which first appeared in bookstores in the year 2008. One of the more bizarre management episodes in Hollywood began in the fall of 1987 when executives of the Coca-Cola Co.
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