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June 17, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Last fall, shortly after Adm. James D. Watkins was asked to lead the embattled presidential AIDS commission, one of its members, New York cancer specialist Burton Lee, was confronted by several leaders of New York City's gay community, hard hit by the epidemic. They were very upset. "My God, a military man," Lee recalled them saying. "How are we going to get any breaks from a guy like this?"
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NEWS
February 18, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deborah Willhite, who helped formulate the U.S. Postal Service's response to last fall's anthrax attacks, stopped taking her antibiotics a full two weeks before her 60-day prescription ended. Willhite, an agency senior vice president deemed at risk for anthrax exposure, couldn't stand the vomiting, an occasional side effect of the medication. The last straw was throwing up in a store parking lot while she was loading packages into her car.
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NEWS
January 11, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials recommended Thursday that the government abandon plans to conduct a nationwide survey to determine the extent of AIDS infection in the United States. Health officials currently estimate that between 1 million and 1.5 million Americans are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The goal of the nationwide survey, first proposed by the Ronald Reagan Administration in 1987, would be to obtain a more accurate projection.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2001 | From Reuters
The U.S. Agriculture Department said Friday that a new study found little risk of "mad cow" disease turning up in American cattle, but as a precaution the government plans to test more cattle and ban the use of spinal column material in processed meat. Harvard University researchers said in a 550-page report that the United States was "extremely unlikely" to suffer an outbreak of the deadly disease, also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), because of strict U.S. trade restrictions.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Measles, once a common rite of passage for U.S. children, has all but been wiped out in this country, federal health officials announced Thursday. In 1998, there were only 100 cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most of them believed to have originated outside the United States.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in nearly 20 years, the incidence of all cancers combined--and most of the leading types of cancer--declined from 1990 to 1995 in the United States, health officials announced Thursday. Death rates from the disease also decreased. The drop in the rate of new cases represents a reversal of a discouraging trend of escalating cancer incidence over nearly two decades, while the decline in the death rate sustains a turnaround noted for the first time last year.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | HARRY NELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For all of this century, coronary heart disease has far exceeded cancer as the leading cause of death in the United States. But uneven success in reducing mortality from each of the diseases is causing researchers to speculate that cancer will replace heart disease as the top killer of Americans sometime around the year 2000. Forty years ago, the death rate for coronary heart disease was more than double that of cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Americans are eating too much animal fat and government regulations make it difficult for the food industry to market leaner and more healthful meats and dairy products, a scientific panel said last week. Although consumption of animal fat has gone down, many Americans still are eating their way to poor health with too much cholesterol, fatty acids and salt, and not enough foods that provide the needed calcium and iron, said a report by a committee of the National Research Council.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government and the American Foundation for AIDS Research announced Monday that they will jointly sponsor a massive, long-term study to see how AIDS infection progresses in various populations. "The scope of this effort is unparalleled," Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan said in a statement. "The study will result in the most comprehensive collection of information on HIV-infected persons amassed in the history of the AIDS epidemic."
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As do many HIV-positive people, Elena Monica does all she can to maintain her health and avoid the disease's symptoms. She sees a conventional medical doctor who checks her blood and advises her. But she also undergoes oxygen therapy, an unproven remedy that involves intramuscular injections of pure liquid oxygen. And she practices chiqong , a form of Chinese meditation.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The nation's AIDS prevention efforts are hobbled by delayed testing, sporadic safe-sex education from physicians, and continued risky behavior among infected people, according to a series of studies released Tuesday. A day after health officials acknowledged that sharp declines in AIDS cases have ended, the studies highlighted systematic failures to adapt to the changing epidemic and reach large numbers of people at risk. "It is a chilling portrait.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Fortifying flour, rice, cornmeal, pasta and other enriched grain products with folic acid appears to be doing what it was designed to do: help prevent a class of devastating birth defects, including spina bifida. Since 1998, when a new law dictated that enriched grain products include folic acid, nationwide rates of neural tube defects have decreased nearly 20%, scientists report.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. George Kung believes RU-486, the French abortion pill approved for sale in the United States last September, is an important reproductive milestone. But the San Diego gynecologist, who performs surgical abortions, does not offer it. He has little incentive to do so. Few women have asked him for the drug, which activists fought for years to bring to this country.
HEALTH
April 9, 2001 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Nearly 20,000 Americans receive organ transplants each year, and their dramatic stories are regularly featured on television and in newspapers and magazines. Little attention is paid, however, to another form of human tissue donation: blood transfusion. Every year, about 4.5 million American men, women and children receive transfusions of blood or blood components that are required to save their lives or maintain their health.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KATHLEEN HOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are getting fewer hours of sleep and spending more time at work, resulting in a fatigued society that has less time to devote to family, social activities and sex, a study released Tuesday has found. The average American gets less than the recommended eight hours of sleep per night, often resulting in drowsiness at work and behind the wheel, according to the annual poll by the National Sleep Foundation.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hospitals nationwide are rationing adult tetanus shots, reserving them for burn victims and other severely injured patients, because of a huge shortage of the vaccine. So far, the crisis concerns only adult versions of the vaccine, not the children's vaccine. But experts are watching to see whether the shortage spreads, and they worry about adult illnesses this spring, when vaccine demand rises along with a seasonal jump in injuries.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | United Press International
Americans born in 1984 had an average life expectancy at birth of 74.7 years, a gain of nearly three years in a decade, and women were expected to live seven years longer than men, the government reported Monday. The outlook was best for white females and worst for black males. People who were 65 in 1984 had an additional life expectancy of 16.8 years on the average, an improvement of more than a year over the previous 10 years, says an annual report on the nation's health statistics.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Barely three days after handing over the leadership of the global mission she founded, Mother Teresa said she would like to work with AIDS patients in the United States. After receiving an award in Calcutta from the Indo-American Society, a group of volunteers and business people from India and the U.S., the 86-year-old nun said, "I'm eager to go to the United States and set up a center for AIDS patients there." She did not elaborate.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
The drug industry boosted its estimate of antibiotic use in chickens, cows and other animals but said the drugs mostly were for treatment or prevention of disease, not growth promotion. About 20.5 million pounds of drugs were given to animals in 1999, up 15% from 1998, according to a survey released Thursday by the Animal Health Institute. More than 80% of the antibiotic use found in the latest survey was for therapeutic, not growth, purposes, the trade group said.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than half of the nation's seafood companies aren't following federal food safety rules designed to protect consumers from food-borne illness, according to a report released Tuesday by congressional investigators.
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